The Cabox

The Cabox is a mountain located in western Newfoundland, near the coastal city of Corner Brook and is the highest peak on the island of Newfoundland.[1] It is 812 m (2,664 ft) high and is the central peak of the Lewis Hills of the Long Range Mountains, which are a range in the Appalachian Mountains.

The Cabox
Lewis Hills, Long Range Mountains, Newfoundland, Canada - 200707
Highest point
Elevation812 m (2,664 ft)
Prominence812 m (2,664 ft)
Listing
Coordinates48°49′59″N 58°29′03″W / 48.83306°N 58.48417°WCoordinates: 48°49′59″N 58°29′03″W / 48.83306°N 58.48417°W
Geography
Parent rangeLong Range Mountains
Topo mapNTS 012/B16
Climbing
First ascentWilliam Seaward (1832)
Easiest routeclass 2 scramble

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Cabox". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada.
Cod Island

Cod Island is an uninhabited island in the northern coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. It is located in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, in the eastern part of the country, 1,700 km northeast of the capital Ottawa. The total area of the island is 133 square kilometers.Early hydrographers referred to the island as Ogua-Lik. On 7 March 1957 the island received its current name.

Geography of Canada

The geography of Canada describes the geographic features of Canada, the world's second largest country in total area.

Situated in northern North America (constituting 41% of the continent's area), Canada spans a vast, diverse territory between the North Pacific Ocean to the west and the North Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Arctic Ocean to the north (hence the country's motto "From sea to sea"), with the United States to the south (contiguous United States) and northwest (Alaska). Greenland is to the northeast; off the southern coast of Newfoundland lies Saint Pierre and Miquelon, an overseas collectivity of France. Since 1925, Canada has claimed the portion of the Arctic between 60°W and 141°W longitude to the North Pole; however, this claim is contested. While the magnetic North Pole lies within the Canadian Arctic territorial claim as of 2011, recent measurements indicate it is moving towards Siberia.Covering 9,984,670 km2 or 3,855,100 sq mi (land: 9,093,507 km2 or 3,511,023 sq mi; freshwater: 891,163 km2 or 344,080 sq mi), Canada is slightly less than three-fifths as large as Russia and slightly smaller than Europe. In total area, Canada is slightly larger than both the U.S. and China; however, Canada ranks fourth in land area (i.e. total area minus the area of lakes and rivers)—China is 9,326,410 km2 (3,600,950 sq mi) and the U.S. is 9,161,923 km2 (3,537,438 sq mi).The population of Canada, 35,151,728 as of May 10, 2016, is concentrated in the south close to its border with the contiguous U.S.; with a population density of 3.5 people per square kilometre (9.1/sq mi), it is one of the most sparsely populated countries in the world. The northernmost settlement in Canada—and in the world—is Canadian Forces Station (CFS) Alert (just north of Alert, Nunavut) on the northern tip of Ellesmere Island at 82°30′N 62°19′W, just 834 kilometres (518 mi) from the North Pole.

Gros Morne, Newfoundland

Gros Morne is a mountain located in western Newfoundland, near the coastal community of Rocky Harbour in Gros Morne National Park. At 807 m (2,648 ft) high, it is the second highest peak on Newfoundland, exceeded only by The Cabox.

International Appalachian Trail

The International Appalachian Trail (IAT; French: Sentier international des Appalaches, SIA) is a hiking trail which runs from the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail at Mount Katahdin, Maine, through New Brunswick, to the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec, after which it follows a ferry route to Newfoundland, and then continues to the northern-easternmost point of the Appalachian Mountains at Belle Isle, Newfoundland and Labrador.

In 2009, IAT discussed with the British Geological Survey in Scotland whether to extend the IAT to the Appalachian terrains of Scotland, Ireland, Northern Ireland and Wales, setting off a series of expansions through Europe and Northern Africa. As of July 2015, there were IAT walking trails in Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Isle of Man, Wales, England, France, Spain, Portugal and Morocco.

Lewis Hills

The Lewis Hills is a section of the Long Range Mountains located on the west coast of Newfoundland, along the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

An ophiolite and Peridotite complex, the Lewis Hills is the southernmost of four such complexes located within the Humber Arm Allochthon, a world-renowned geological area. It is located in an area stretching between the town of Stephenville in the south and the city of Corner Brook in the north.

The Lewis Hills is an excellent backcountry wilderness hiking destination. The most accessible day-hiking route to the Lewis Hills is by the International Appalachian Trail, with the southern trail head located almost at the end of Cold Brook Road, and the northern trail head at the end of Logger School Road

At 814 m (2,671 ft) above sea level, the highest elevation on Newfoundland is The Cabox located in the Lewis Hills at 48°49′59″N 58°29′03″W.

List of extreme summits of Canada

This article comprises four sortable tables of mountain summits of Canada that are the higher than any other point north or south of their latitude or east or west their longitude in Canada.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of islands by highest point

This is a list of islands in the world ordered by their highest point. It includes all islands with peaks higher than 2,000 m. At the end of this article continental landmasses are also included for comparison.

Countries and territories listed are those containing the highest point; other countries and territories on the same landmass are listed separately.

List of mountain peaks of North America

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of greater North America.The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 100 highest major summits of greater North America by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 50 most prominent summits of greater North America.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 50 most isolated major summits of greater North America.

List of mountains of the Appalachians

This is a non-exhaustive list of mountains of the Appalachians.

List of the major 100-kilometer summits of North America

The following sortable table comprises the 230 mountain peaks of greater North America with at least 100 kilometers (62.14 miles) of topographic isolation and at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.Denali is one of only three summits on Earth with more than 6000 kilometers (3728 miles) of topographic isolation. Four major summits of greater North America exceed 2000 kilometers (1243 miles), eight exceed 1000 kilometers (621.4 miles), 35 exceed 500 kilometers (310.7 miles), 107 exceed 200 kilometers (124.3 miles), the following 230 major summits exceed 100 kilometers (62.14 miles), and 413 exceed 50 kilometers (31.07 miles) of topographic isolation.

List of the most isolated major summits of Canada

The following sortable table comprises the 150 most topographically isolated mountain peaks of Canada with at least 500 metres (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.Twelve major summits of Canada exceed 500 kilometers (310.7 miles) of topographic isolation, 31 exceed 200 kilometers (124.3 miles), 50 exceed 100 kilometers (62.14 miles), and 92 major summits exceed 50 kilometers (31.07 miles) of topographic isolation.

List of the most isolated major summits of North America

The following sortable table comprises the 200 most topographically isolated mountain peaks of greater North America with at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.Denali is one of only three summits on Earth with more than 6000 kilometers (3728 miles) of topographic isolation. Four major summits of greater North America exceed 2000 kilometers (1243 miles), eight exceed 1000 kilometers (621.4 miles), 35 exceed 500 kilometers (310.7 miles), 107 exceed 200 kilometers (124.3 miles), 230 exceed 100 kilometers (62.14 miles), and 413 exceed 50 kilometers (31.07 miles) of topographic isolation.

Long Range Mountains

The Long Range Mountains are a series of mountains along the west coast of the Canadian island of Newfoundland. They also form the northernmost section of the Appalachian chain on the eastern seaboard of North America. In 2003 it was announced that the International Appalachian Trail would be extended through the Long Range Mountains.

The Great Northern Peninsula of Western Newfoundland contains the Highlands, the largest external basement massif of the Grenville Orogeny in the Appalachian Orogen. This Precambrian basement is known as the Long Range Inlier, Long Range Complex or Basement Gneiss Complex, consisting of quartz-feldspar gneisses and granites that are up to 1,550 million years in age. The Long Range dikes are mafic in composition and have an age of about 605 million years.Running along the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the range includes the following sections:

Anguille Mountains,

Lewis Hills,

Tablelands (a section of the Earth's mantle exposed at the surface)

main section of the Long Range Mountains (running northeast from the Tablelands through Gros Morne National Park)

Mountain peaks of Canada

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of Canada.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 100 highest major summits of Canada by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 50 most prominent summits of Canada.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 50 most isolated major summits of Canada.

Newfoundland (island)

Newfoundland (, locally ; French: Terre-Neuve) is a large Canadian island off the east coast of the North American mainland, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It has 29 percent of the province's land area. The island is separated from the Labrador Peninsula by the Strait of Belle Isle and from Cape Breton Island by the Cabot Strait. It blocks the mouth of the Saint Lawrence River, creating the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, the world's largest estuary. Newfoundland's nearest neighbour is the French overseas community of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon.

With an area of 108,860 square kilometres (42,031 sq mi), Newfoundland is the world's 16th-largest island, Canada's fourth-largest island, and the largest Canadian island outside the North. The provincial capital, St. John's, is located on the southeastern coast of the island; Cape Spear, just south of the capital, is the easternmost point of North America, excluding Greenland. It is common to consider all directly neighbouring islands such as New World, Twillingate, Fogo and Bell Island to be 'part of Newfoundland' (i.e., distinct from Labrador). By that classification, Newfoundland and its associated small islands have a total area of 111,390 square kilometres (43,008 sq mi).According to 2006 official Census Canada statistics, 57% of responding Newfoundland and Labradorians claim British or Irish ancestry, with 43.2% claiming at least one English parent, 21.5% at least one Irish parent, and 7% at least one parent of Scottish origin. Additionally 6.1% claimed at least one parent of French ancestry. The island's total population as of the 2006 census was 479,105.

Kaumajet Mountains
Long Range Mountains
Torngat Mountains
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