TheFreeDictionary.com

The Free Dictionary is an American online dictionary and encyclopedia that gathers information from a variety of sources.

The Free Dictionary
TheFreeDictionary
Screenshot
TheFreeDictionary.com screenshot
Type of site
Online dictionary and encyclopedia
Available inEnglish, Spanish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Portuguese, Dutch, Norwegian, Greek, Arabic, Polish, Turkish, Russian
OwnerFarlex, Inc.[1]
WebsiteTheFreeDictionary.com
Alexa rankNegative increase 472 (February 2017)[2]
RegistrationOptional
LaunchedJune 5, 2003[3]
Current statusActive

Content

The site cross-references the contents of The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, the Columbia Encyclopedia, the Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, the Hutchinson Encyclopedia (subscription) and Wikipedia, as well as the Acronym Finder database, several financial dictionaries, legal dictionaries and other content.[4]

It has a feature that allows a user to preview an article while positioning the mouse cursor over a link. One can also double click on any word and look it up in the dictionary.

Site operator

The site is run by Farlex, Inc., located in Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania.

Farlex also maintains a companion title, TheFreeLibrary.com, an online library of out-of-copyright classic books and a collection of periodicals of over two million articles dating back to 1984, and definition-of.com,[5] a community dictionary of slang and other terms.

Mirroring Wikipedia

Wikipedia content is hosted at the sub-domain encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com, which is excluded from search-engine indexing in its entirety by Farlex with the use of meta tags. This is done to avoid duplicate content in the search-engine results and prevent user traffic that would otherwise go to Wikipedia.

The Free Library

The Free Library
Type of site
Classic-literature reference and historical news
Available inEnglish
OwnerFarlex, Inc.[1]
WebsiteTheFreeLibrary.com
Alexa rankNegative increase 52,236 (February 2017)[6]
RegistrationOptional (for personalized features)
Current statusActive

The Free Library is a free reference website that offers full-text versions of classic literary works by hundreds of authors. It is also a news aggregator, offering articles from a large collection of periodicals containing over four million articles dating back to 1984. Newly published articles are added to the site daily. The site comprises a selection of articles from open-access journals that can in many cases also be found on a journal's own website.

It is a sister site to The Free Dictionary and usage examples in the form of "references in classic literature" taken from the site's collection are used on The Free Dictionary's definition pages. In addition, double-clicking on a word in the site's collection of reference materials brings up the word's definition on The Free Dictionary.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b farlex.com
  2. ^ "TheFreeDictionary.com Site Info". Alexa.com. Alexa Internet. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  3. ^ "TheFreeDictionary.com WHOIS, DNS, & Domain Info - DomainTools". WHOIS. Retrieved 2016-09-23.
  4. ^ "Sources of data". The Free Dictionary. Retrieved June 10, 2009.
  5. ^ definition-of.com
  6. ^ "TheFreeLibrary.com Site Info". Alexa.com. Alexa Internet. Retrieved February 21, 2017.

External links

Arthropathy

An arthropathy is a disease of a joint. Arthritis is a form of arthropathy that involves inflammation of one or more joints, while the term arthropathy may be used regardless of whether there is inflammation or not.

Spondylarthropathy is any form of arthropathy of the vertebral column.

Battle of Cetate

The Battle of Cetate was fought during the Crimean War. In this battle a large Ottoman force under Ahmed Pasha attempted to capture the village of Cetate in Wallachia, controlled by the troops of Colonel Alexander Baumgarten, but were unsuccessful.

Caudex

A caudex (plural: caudices) of a plant is a stem, but the term is also used to mean a rootstock and particularly a basal stem structure from which new growth arises.In the strict sense of the term, meaning a stem, "caudex" is most often used with plants that have a different stem morphology from the typical angiosperm dicotyledon stem: examples of this include palms, ferns, and cycads.

The related term caudiciform, literally meaning stem-like, is sometimes used to mean pachycaul, thick-stemmed.

Cause célèbre

A cause célèbre (, , French: [koz selɛbʁ], famous case; plural causes célèbres, pronounced like singular) is an issue or incident arousing widespread controversy, outside campaigning, and heated public debate. The term continues in the media in all senses. It is sometimes used positively for celebrated legal cases for their precedent value (each locus classicus or "case-in-point") and more often negatively for infamous ones, whether for scale, outrage, scandal or conspiracy theories.The term is a French phrase in common usage in English. Since it has been fully adopted into English and is included unitalicized in English dictionaries, it is not normally italicized despite its French origin.

In French, cause means, here, a legal case, and célèbre means "famous". The phrase originated with the 37-volume Nouvelles Causes Célèbres, published in 1763, which was a collection of reports of well-known French court decisions from the 17th and 18th centuries.

While English speakers had used the phrase for many years, it came into much more common usage after the 1894 conviction of Alfred Dreyfus for espionage during the cementing of a period of deep cultural ties with a political tie between England and France, the Entente Cordiale. Both attracted worldwide interest and the period of closeness or rapprochement officially broadened the English language.

It has been noted that the public attention given to a particular case or event can obscure the facts rather than clarify them. As one observer states, "The true story of many a cause célèbre is never made manifest in the evidence given or in the advocates' orations, but might be recovered from these old papers when the dust of ages has rendered them immune from scandal".

Collectable

A collectable (collectible or collector's item) is any object regarded as being of value or interest to a collector (not necessarily monetarily valuable or antique). There are numerous types of collectables and terms to denote those types. An antique is a collectable that is old. A curio is a small, usually fascinating or unusual item sought by collectors. A manufactured collectable is an item made specifically for people to collect.

Detoxification

Detoxification or detoxication (detox for short) is the physiological or medicinal removal of toxic substances from a living organism, including the human body, which is mainly carried out by the liver. Additionally, it can refer to the period of withdrawal during which an organism returns to homeostasis after long-term use of an addictive substance. In medicine, detoxification can be achieved by decontamination of poison ingestion and the use of antidotes as well as techniques such as dialysis and (in a limited number of cases) chelation therapy.Many alternative medicine practitioners promote various types of detoxification such as detoxification diets. Scientists have described these as a "waste of time and money". Sense About Science, a UK-based charitable trust, determined that most such dietary "detox" claims lack any supporting evidence.

Hypersalivation

Hypersalivation is excessive production of saliva. It has also been defined as increased amount of saliva in the mouth, which may also be caused by decreased clearance of saliva.Hypersalivation can contribute to drooling if there is an inability to keep the mouth closed or difficulty in swallowing the excess saliva (dysphagia), which can lead to excessive spitting.

Hypersalivation also often precedes emesis (vomiting), where it accompanies nausea (a feeling of needing to vomit).

Iron overload

Iron overload (also known as haemochromatosis or hemochromatosis) indicates accumulation of iron in the body from any cause. The most important causes are hereditary haemochromatosis (HHC), a genetic disorder, and transfusional iron overload, which can result from repeated blood transfusions.

List of eponymous fractures

Eponymous fractures and fracture-dislocations are most commonly named after the doctor who first described them. They may also be named after an activity with which they are associated.

List of slapstick comedy topics

This is a list of slapstick comedy topics. Slapstick is a type of broad physical comedy involving exaggerated, boisterous actions (e.g. a pie in the face), farce, violence and activities which may exceed the boundaries of common sense.

Ornamental plant

Ornamental plants are plants that are grown for decorative purposes in gardens and landscape design projects, as houseplants, cut flowers and specimen display. The cultivation of ornamental plants is called floriculture, which forms a major branch of horticulture.

Pinot (grape)

Pinot (pronounced ) is a Burgundian grape family.

Reflex

A reflex, or reflex action, is an involuntary and nearly instantaneous movement in response to a stimulus. A reflex is made possible by neural pathways called reflex arcs which can act on an impulse before that impulse reaches the brain. The reflex is then an automatic response to a stimulus that does not receive or need conscious thought.

Roach (smoking)

A roach is the remains of a joint, blunt or roll up cigarette after most of it has been smoked.Small metal clips to facilitate the smoking of a "roach" are called roach clips.In Europe, the United Kingdom and most Commonwealth nations, "roach" can also refer to a bit of rolled thin cardboard in one end to serve as a mouthpiece - called a "filter" in North America. When this is employed, a joint can still be held securely after it has burnt down to a short length; thus, the entire length of the joint may be smoked without the aid of a roach clip.

Slapstick

Slapstick is a style of humor involving exaggerated physical activity which exceeds the boundaries of normal physical comedy. The term arises from a device developed during the broad, physical comedy style known as Commedia dell'arte in 16th Century Italy. The "slap stick" consists of two thin slats of wood, which make a 'slap' when striking another actor, with little force needed to make a loud—and comical—sound. The physical slap stick remains a key component of the plot in the traditional and popular Punch and Judy puppet show.

Sycosis

Sycosis is an inflammation of hair follicles, especially of the beard area, and generally classified as papulopustular and chronic.Types include:

Sycosis barbae

Lupoid sycosis

Tinea sycosis

Herpetic sycosis

Telmatology

Telmatology is a branch of physical geography concerned with the study of wetlands, such as marshes or swamps.

The Thief (1952 film)

The Thief is a 1952 American film noir crime film directed by Russell Rouse and starring Ray Milland. The film is noted for having no spoken dialogue; the only dialogue present in the film is represented through closeup shots of two telegrams.

Top sirloin

Top sirloin is a cut of beef from the primal loin or subprimal sirloin. Top sirloin steaks differ from sirloin steaks in that the bone and the tenderloin and bottom round muscles have been removed; the remaining major muscles are the gluteus medius and biceps femoris (top sirloin cap steak). Some American butchers call a thick top sirloin steak a chateaubriand, although the French reserve that term for a more premium cut from the tenderloin.

The USDA NAMP / IMPS codes related to this subprimal cut are 181A and 184. 181A is obtained from 181 after removing the bottom sirloin and the butt tender (the part of the tenderloin which is in the sirloin). 184 is obtained from 182 after removing the bottom sirloin. The foodservice cuts from 184 are 184A through 184F, its portion cut is 1184 and, the "subportion" cuts from 1184 are 1184A through 1184F. 181A is not further divided into foodservice cuts. In Australia, this cut is called D-rump in the Handbook of Australian Meat and assigned code 2100.

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