Thad Levine

Thad Levine (born November 12, 1971) is an American baseball executive. He is the senior VP and general manager for the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball.

Thad Levine
Minnesota Twins
General Manager, Senior Vice President
Born: November 12, 1971 (age 47)
Alexandria, Virginia
Teams

Early life and education

Levine was born in Alexandria, Virginia. He played youth soccer with Paul DePodesta.[1] Levine attended Haverford College, where he played NCAA Division III college baseball.[1] He attained his bachelor's degree in 1994.[2] He also graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1999 with an MBA.

Career

Levine joined the Los Angeles Dodgers in business development. He moved to the Colorado Rockies in 1999,[3] and worked there successively as an assistant director, director, and senior director.[4] Levine was appointed to the position of Texas Rangers assistant general manager in October 2005.[5][2][6] He was hired as the Minnesota Twins general manager on November 3, 2016.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/nationals/texas-rangers-assistant-gm-thad-levine-inherited-his-love-of-the-game-from-his-father-in-alexandria/2011/10/17/gIQALBbhsL_story.html
  2. ^ a b "Texas Rangers Executives". Mlb.com. November 12, 1971. Retrieved March 18, 2010.
  3. ^ "Thad Levine". Jewishvirtuallibrary.org. Retrieved March 18, 2010.
  4. ^ "Top 10 General Manager Prospects". Baseball America. December 9, 2003. Retrieved March 18, 2010.
  5. ^ "Thad Levine named assistant general manager | texasrangers.com: Official Info". Texas.rangers.mlb.com. October 19, 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2010.
  6. ^ "The Seattle Times: Mariners: MLB notebook: 41-year-old Girardi replaces McKeon, 74". Seattletimes.nwsource.com. October 20, 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2010.
  7. ^ https://www.mlb.com/news/twins-introduce-derek-falvey-thad-levine/c-208282658 |Retrieved October 2, 2018

External links

1901 Washington Senators season

The 1901 Washington Senators won 61 games, lost 72, and finished in sixth place in the American League in its first year as a major league team. They were managed by Jim Manning and played home games at American League Park II.

1904 Washington Senators season

The 1904 Washington Senators won 38 games, lost 113, and finished in eighth place in the American League. They were managed by Malachi Kittridge and Patsy Donovan and played home games at National Park.

1911 Washington Senators season

The 1911 Washington Senators won 64 games, lost 90, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Jimmy McAleer and played home games at National Park.

1912 Washington Senators season

The 1912 Washington Senators won 91 games, lost 61, and finished in second place in the American League. They were managed by Clark Griffith and played their home games at National Park.

1926 Washington Senators season

The 1926 Washington Senators won 81 games, lost 69, and finished in fourth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1930 Washington Senators season

The 1930 Washington Senators won 94 games, lost 60, and finished in second place in the American League. They were managed by Walter Johnson and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1937 Washington Senators season

The 1937 Washington Senators won 73 games, lost 80, and finished in sixth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1941 Washington Senators season

The 1941 Washington Senators won 70 games, lost 84, and finished in sixth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1951 Washington Senators season

The 1951 Washington Senators won 62 games, lost 92, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1953 Washington Senators season

The 1953 Washington Senators won 76 games, lost 76, and finished in fifth place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium. This was their last winning season until 1962.

Dave St. Peter

David St. Peter (born January 3, 1967 in Bismarck, North Dakota) has served as president of the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball since 2002.

St. Peter was born in Bismarck, North Dakota, and attended St. Mary's Central High School in Bismarck and the University of North Dakota. He joined the Twins organization in 1990.

Derek Falvey

Derek Falvey (born March 19, 1983) is an American baseball executive who is currently the Executive Vice President and Chief Baseball Officer for the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Prior to joining the Twins, Falvey was an executive for the Cleveland Indians.

Elizabethton Twins

The Elizabethton Twins are a minor league baseball team of the Appalachian League and a rookie-level farm club of the Minnesota Twins. They are located in Elizabethton, Tennessee, and are named for their major league affiliate. The team plays its home games at Joe O'Brien Field which opened in 1974 and seats 2,000 fans. The Twins have won the Appalachian League Championship on 12 occasions (1978, 1984, 1989, 1990, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2012, 2017, and 2018).

Jeff Bridich

Jeffrey Thomas Bridich (born September 10, 1977 in Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin) is an American baseball executive. He is the general manager of the Colorado Rockies of Major League Baseball.

List of Minnesota Twins broadcasters

The Minnesota Twins baseball team have had many broadcasters in their history in Minnesota. Here is a list of the people who have been a part of bringing the Twins to the people of Minnesota.

Paul DePodesta

Paul DePodesta (born December 16, 1972) is the chief strategy officer for the National Football League (NFL)'s Cleveland Browns.

Formerly a front-office assistant for the Cleveland Indians, Oakland Athletics and most recently the New York Mets, DePodesta was also general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The year after leading the Dodgers to their first playoff win in 16 years, he was fired after the 2005 club finished with its worst record in 11 years. He was the ninth general manager in the club's history since its move to Los Angeles. He is also known for his appearance in the book and movie Moneyball, about his time with the Athletics.

Thad

Thad is a masculine given name, often a short form (hypocorism) of Thaddeus. It may refer to:

Thad Allen (born 1949), United States Coast Guard admiral

Thad Altman (born 1955), American politician

Thad Balkman (born 1971), American politician, lawyer, and judge

Thaddeus Thad Bingel, American educator and political consultant

Thaddis Thad Bosley (born 1956), American baseball player

Thaddeus Thad F. Brown (1902–1970), American police chief

Thad Busby (born 1974), American football player

Thaddeus Thad Carhart (born 1950), American writer

Thad Castle, character in the TV series Blue Mountain State

William Thad Cochran (1937–2019), United States Senator from Mississippi

Thad Cockrell, American singer-songwriter

Thaddeus Thad A. Eure (1899–1993), American politician

Thad McIntosh Guyer (born 1950), American lawyer

Thad Heartfield (born 1940), American lawyer and federal judge

Thaddeus Thad Hutcheson (1915–1986), American attorney and politician

Thad J. Jakubowski (1924–2013), American Roman Catholic bishop

Thad Jaracz (born 1946), American basketball player

Thaddeus Thad Jones (1923–1986), American jazz trumpeter and bandleader

Thad Krasnesky, American children's author

Thad Levine (born 1971), American baseball executive

Thaddeus Thad Lewis (born 1987), American football player

Thaddeus Thad Luckinbill (born 1975), American actor and film producer

Thad Matta (born 1967), American men's basketball coach

Thad McArthur (born 1928), American Olympic modern pentathlete

Thad McClammy (born 1942), American politician

Thaddus Thad McFadden (American football) (born 1962), American football player

Thaddus Thad McFadden (basketball) (born 1987), American basketball player

Thaddeus Thad Moffitt (born 2000), American racing driver

Thaddeus Thad Mumford (1951–2018), American television writer and producer

Thaddeus Thad Spencer (1943–2013), American heavyweight boxer

Thad Starner, American computer scientist

Thaddeus Thad Stem Jr. (1916–1980), American author and poet

Thaddeus Stevens (1792–1868), United States Representative from Pennsylvania

Robert Thaddeus R. Thad Taylor (1925–2006), American theatre director

Thaddeus Thad Tillotson (1940–2012), American baseball pitcher

Thad Vann (1907–1982), American football player and coach

Thad Viers (born 1978), American politician

Thad Vreeland Jr. (1924–2010), American materials scientist

Thad Weber (born 1984), American baseball pitcher

The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant

The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant is a 1954 novel by Douglass Wallop. It adapts the Faust theme of a deal with the Devil to the world of American baseball in the 1950s.

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