Tex Hughson

Cecil Carlton Hughson, (February 9, 1916 – August 6, 1993), was a Major League Baseball starting pitcher who played his entire career in the American League with the Boston Red Sox (1941–44, 1946–49). He batted and threw right-handed.

A native of Kyle, Texas, Hughson played collegiately at the University of Texas at Austin. He was a successful and competitive major league pitcher who was not averse to throwing close to batters, changing speeds by mixing a hard fastball with an overhand curveball. At the height of his career, arm and shoulder injuries threatened permanent disability and hastened his retirement.

Hughson enjoyed his best season in 1942, posting a 22–6 record with a 2.59 ERA, and also leading the league in victories, strikeouts (113), complete games (22), innings pitched (281.0) and batters faced (1150). In 1943, he won 12 games with 114 strikeouts and a 2.64 ERA, and again led the league in complete games (20). He also had his best year batting, posting career highs in hits, runs, doubles, walks, batting average and RBI's. He led the league in winning percentage (18-5,.783) and WHIP (9.43), and also had a career-best ERA of 2.26.

After serving in the military in 1945, he won 20 games in 1946, led the league in walks per nine innings (1.65), set a career high in strikeouts with 172, and completed 21 of 35 starts. His several 1-0 shutouts led to an early pennant-clinching for the Red Sox. But he fell to 12 wins in 1947, and finished his career when only 33 after two seasons in relief.

In an eight-year career, he posted a 96–54 won-lost record with 693 strikeouts and a 2.94 ERA in 1375.2 innings. His control was good enough for an effective 1.86 strikeout-to-walk ratio (693-to-372). He was an American League All-Star for three consecutive years (1942–44).

After retirement from baseball, he joined his dad and uncle at Hughson Meat Company in San Marcos, Texas in the 1950s. Sometime in the 1990s, after the slaughter plant's closure, the 40 acres of land it had occupied were designated as greenspace and are now known as Ringtail Ridge Natural Area. The foundations of the plant and other artifacts can still be seen. He was one of the first in the United States to raise Charolois cattle. He served on the local school Board of Trustees in the 1950s where he was one who led the effort to integrate the public schools. In the 60's he developed part of his ranch into the Hughson Heights subdivision.

He died in San Marcos at age 77, and is buried in San Marcos Cemetery. He was enshrined in the University of Texas Hall of Honor in 1970', the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1987, and the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in November 2002.

Tex Hughson
Tex Hughson
Pitcher
Born: February 9, 1916
Buda, Texas
Died: August 6, 1993 (aged 77)
San Marcos, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1941, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1949, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record96–54
Earned run average2.94
Strikeouts693
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1941 Boston Red Sox season

The 1941 Boston Red Sox season was the 41st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 84 wins and 70 losses. The team featured five future Hall of Famers: player-manager Joe Cronin, Bobby Doerr, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Grove, and Ted Williams.

1942 Boston Red Sox season

The 1942 Boston Red Sox season was the 42nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 93 wins and 59 losses.

1942 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world.

1943 Boston Red Sox season

The 1943 Boston Red Sox season was the 43rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 68 wins and 84 losses. The team set a major league record which still stands by playing in 31 extra innings games, winning 15 and losing 14, with 2 games tied. They played 352 extra innings in total, equivalent to playing an additional 39 games.

1943 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1943 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 11th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1943, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, the home of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 5–3.

This was the first major league All-Star Game scheduled as a night game.

1944 Boston Red Sox season

The 1944 Boston Red Sox season was the 44th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 77 wins and 77 losses.

1944 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1944 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 12th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" between Major League Baseball's American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The All-Star Game was held on July 11, 1944 at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the home of the NL's Pittsburgh Pirates.

The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 7–1.Played during World War II, receipts from the game were distributed to a fund that provided baseball equipment to members of the armed services.

1946 Boston Red Sox season

The 1946 Boston Red Sox season was the 46th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 104 wins and 50 losses. This was the team's sixth AL championship, and their first since 1918. In the 1946 World Series, the Red Sox lost to the National League (NL) champion St. Louis Cardinals, whose winning run in the seventh game was scored on Enos Slaughter's famous "Mad Dash".

1946 World Series

The 1946 World Series was played in October 1946 between the St. Louis Cardinals (representing the National League) and the Boston Red Sox (representing the American League). This was the Red Sox's first appearance in a World Series since their championship of 1918.

In the eighth inning of Game 7, with the score 3–3, the Cardinals' Enos Slaughter opened the inning with a single but two batters failed to advance him. With two outs, Harry Walker walloped a hit over Johnny Pesky's head into left-center field. As Leon Culberson chased it down, Slaughter started his "mad dash". Pesky caught Culberson's throw, turned and—perhaps surprised to see Slaughter headed for the plate—supposedly hesitated just a split second before throwing home. Roy Partee had to take a few steps up the third base line to catch Pesky's toss, but Slaughter was safe without a play at the plate and Walker was credited with an RBI double. The Cardinals won the game and the Series in seven games, giving them their sixth championship.

Boston superstar Ted Williams played the Series injured and was largely ineffective but refused to use his injury as an excuse.

As the first World Series to be played after wartime travel restrictions had been lifted, it returned from the 3-4 format to the 2–3–2 format for home teams, which has been used ever since. It also saw the return of many prominent players from military service.

1947 Boston Red Sox season

The 1947 Boston Red Sox season was the 47th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1948 Boston Red Sox season

The 1948 Boston Red Sox season was the 48th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 96 wins and 59 losses, including the loss of a one-game playoff to the Cleveland Indians after both teams had finished the regular schedule with identical 96–58 records. The first Red Sox season to be broadcast on television, broadcasts were then alternated between WBZ-TV and WNAC-TV but with the same broadcast team regardless of broadcasting station.

1949 Boston Red Sox season

The 1949 Boston Red Sox season was the 49th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 96 wins and 58 losses. The Red Sox set a major league record which still stands for the most base on balls by a team in a season, with 835.

1949 New York Yankees season

The 1949 New York Yankees season was the team's 47th season in New York, and its 49th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 16th pennant, finishing 1 game ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel in his first year. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

The Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame was instituted in 1995 to recognize the careers of former Boston Red Sox baseball players. A 15-member selection committee of Red Sox broadcasters and executives, past and present media personnel, and representatives from The Sports Museum of New England and the BoSox Club are responsible for nominating candidates.

Hughson (surname)

Hughson is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Fred Hughson (1914–?), Australian rules footballer

Jim Hughson (born 1956), Canadian television sportscaster

Les Hughson (1907–1985), Australian rules footballer

Nathaniel Hughson (1755–1837), American city founder

Tex Hughson (1916–1993), American baseball player

Ursula Hughson (born 1992), Australian women's soccer player

List of Boston Red Sox Opening Day starting pitchers

The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Boston, Massachusetts. They have played in the American League since it was founded in 1901, and the American League East since divisions were introduced in 1969. The first game of each baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, for which being named the starting pitcher is an honor. That honor is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, although there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.

List of Boston Red Sox award winners

This is a list of award winners and single-season leaderboards for the Boston Red Sox professional baseball team.

List of Major League Baseball annual strikeout leaders

In baseball, the strikeout is a statistic used to evaluate pitchers. A pitcher earns a strikeout when he puts out the batter he is facing by throwing a ball through the strike zone, "defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap", which is not put in play. Strikeouts are awarded in four situations: if the batter is put out on a third strike caught by the catcher (to "strike out swinging" or "strike out looking"); if the pitcher throws a third strike which is not caught with fewer than two outs; if the batter becomes a baserunner on an uncaught third strike; or if the batter bunts the ball into foul territory with two strikes.Major League Baseball recognizes the player or players in each league with the most strikeouts each season. Jim Devlin led the National League in its inaugural season of 1876; he threw 122 strikeouts for the Louisville Grays. The American League's first winner was Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young, who captured the American League Triple Crown in 1901 by striking out 158 batters, along with leading the league in wins and earned run average. Walter Johnson led the American League in strikeouts 12 times during his Hall of Fame career, most among all players. He is followed by Nolan Ryan, who captured 11 titles between both leagues (9 American League and 2 National League). Randy Johnson won nine strikeout titles, including five with his home state Arizona Diamondbacks. Three players have won seven strikeout championships: Dazzy Vance, who leads the National League; Bob Feller; and Lefty Grove. Grover Cleveland Alexander and Rube Waddell led their league six times, and five-time winners include Steve Carlton, Roger Clemens, Sam McDowell, Christy Mathewson, Amos Rusie, and Tom Seaver.There are several players with a claim to the single-season strikeout record. Among recognized major leagues, Matt Kilroy accumulated the highest single-season total, with 513 strikeouts for the Baltimore Orioles of the American Association in 1886. However, his name does not appear on Major League Baseball's single-season leaders list, since the American Association was independent of the constituent leagues that currently make up Major League Baseball. Several other players with high totals, including 1886 American Association runner-up Toad Ramsey (499) and 1884 Union Association leader Hugh Daily (483), do not appear either. In the National League, Charles "Old Hoss" Radbourn struck out 441 batters for the Providence Grays; however, the Providence franchise folded after the 1885 season and has no successor. Therefore, Major League Baseball recognizes his runner-up from that season, Charlie Buffinton, as the record-holder with 417 strikeouts. In the American League, Ryan leads with 383 strikeouts in 1973. The largest margin of victory for a champion is 156 strikeouts, achieved in 1883 when Tim Keefe of the American Association's New York Metropolitans posted 359 against Bobby Mathews' 203. The National League's largest margin was achieved in 1999, when Randy Johnson struck out 143 more batters than Kevin Brown. Ryan's 1973 margin of 125 strikeouts over Bert Blyleven is the best American League victory. Although ties for the championship are rare, they have occurred; Claude Passeau and Bucky Walters each struck out 137 National League batters in 1939, and Tex Hughson and Bobo Newsom tied in the American League with 113 strikeouts each in 1942. Their total is the lowest number of strikeouts accumulated to lead a league in Major League Baseball history.

Tex (name)

Tex is a nickname, usually for someone from the U.S. state of Texas. Notable people with the nickname include:

Robert Allen (actor) (1906–1998), American film actor

Tex Austin (1886–1938), American rodeo promoter

Tex Avery (1908–1980), American animator, cartoonist, and director, famous for producing animated cartoons

Tex Banwell (1917–1999), British Second World War soldier and decoy for General Bernard Montgomery

Tex Beneke (1914–2000), American saxophonist, singer, and bandleader

Tex Brashear (born 1955), American voice actor, previously in radio

Tex Carleton (1906–1977), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Tex Clevenger (born 1932), American retired Major League Baseball pitcher

Randall "Tex" Cobb (born 1950), American boxer and actor

Tex Coulter (1924–2007), American National Football League lineman

Tex Erwin (1885–1963), American Major League Baseball catcher

David Lee "Tex" Hill (1915–2007), American World War II flying ace and brigadier general

Tex Hughson (1916–1993), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Tex Irvin (1906–1978), American football player

Tex Jeanes (1900–1973), American Major League Baseball player

Alvin "Tex" Johnston (1914–1998), American test pilot

Tex Maule (1915–1981), longtime lead American football writer for Sports Illustrated magazine

Tex McDonald (1891–1943), America Major League Baseball player

Tex Morton (1916–1983), New Zealand singer

Tex Perkins (born 1964), Australian rock musician

Tex Rickard (1870–1929), American boxing promoter, founder of the New York Rangers hockey team and builder of the third incarnation of Madison Square Garden

Tex Ritter (1905–1974), American country singer and actor

Tex Schramm (1920–2003), original president and general manager of the U.S. National Football League's Dallas Cowboys franchise

Tex Shirley (1918–1993), American Major League Baseball pitcher

Mark Teixeira (born 1980), Major League Baseball player

Tex Walker (born 1990), professional Australian rules footballer playing for Adelaide Crows

Tex Watson (born 1945), American murderer and former member of the Manson Family

Tex Williams (1917–1985), American country musician

Tex Winter (1922–2018), American basketball coach

Tex Wisterzil (1888–1964), American Major League Baseball player

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