Teuthrania

Teuthrania (Ancient Greek: Τευθρανία) was a town in the western part of ancient Mysia, and the name of its district about the river Caicus, which was believed to be derived from a legendary Mysian king Teuthras. This king is said to have adopted, as his son and successor, Telephus, a son of Heracles; and Eurypylus, the son of Telephus, appears in the Odyssey as the ruler of the Ceteii.[1][2] The town was situated between Elaea, Pitane, and Atarneus.[1][3][4] The nearby towns of Halisarna, Pergamum, and Teuthrania had been given by the Persian king Darius I to the Spartan king Demaratus about the year 486 BCE for his help in the expedition against Greece. Demaratus's descendants continued to rule these cities at the beginning of the 4th century BCE.[5][6] During the withdrawal of Pergamum from The March of the Ten Thousand, it was attacked by, among others, troops from Halisarna and Teuthrania under command of Procles, son of Demaratus.[7] In the Hellenica, Xenophon relates that Teuthrania, together with Pergamum, Halisarna, Gambrium, Palaegambrium, Myrina and Gryneium were delivered by their rulers to the army that, under the command of the Spartan Thimbron, around the year 399 BCE, had come to the area to try to liberate the Greek colonies from the Persian domain.[5]

Its site is located near modern Kalerga, in Asiatic Turkey.[8][9]

References

  1. ^ a b Strabo. Geographica. iii. p.615. Page numbers refer to those of Isaac Casaubon's edition.
  2. ^ Homer. Odyssey. 10.520.
  3. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium. Ethnica. s.v.
  4. ^ Xenophon, Hist. Gr. 2.1.6.
  5. ^ a b Xenophon. Hellenica. 3.1.6.
  6. ^ Herodotus. Histories. 6.70.
  7. ^ Xenophon, Anabasis 7.8.17.
  8. ^ Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 56, and directory notes accompanying.
  9. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1854–1857). "Teuthrania". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography. London: John Murray.

Coordinates: 39°02′07″N 27°03′17″E / 39.035223°N 27.054771°E

Argiope (mythology)

In Greek mythology, Argiope (Ancient Greek: Αργιόπη "silver face") may refer to:

Argiope, naiad daughter of the River God Nile. She was wife of Agenor and mother of Europa, Cadmus, Phoenix and Cilix. More commonly known as Telephassa.

Argiope, naiad, possibly the daughter of the river-god Cephissus, mother of Thamyris by Philammon. She lived at first on Mount Parnassus but when Philammon refused to take her into his house as his wife, she left Parnassus and went to the country of the Odrysians in Thrace when pregnant.

Argiope, naiad of the town of Eleusis, mother of Cercyon by Branchus. Possibly same as the above Argiope thus, a daughter of the river-god Cephissus.

Argiope, daughter of Teuthras, king of Teuthrania, a region near Mysia in Asia Minor. She married Telephus, son of Heracles.Not to be confused with Agriope (Ἀγριόπην)

Agriope, another name for Eurydice, wife of Orpheus whom the hero unsuccessfully brought back from Hades.

Ariassus

Ariassus or Ariassos (Ancient Greek: Άριασσός) was a town in Pisidia, Asia Minor built on a steep hillside about 50 kilometres inland from Attaleia (modern Antalya).

Caloe

Caloe was a town in the Roman province of Asia. It is mentioned as Kaloe or Keloue in 3rd-century inscriptions, as Kalose in Hierocles's Synecdemos (660), and as Kalloe, Kaloe, and Kolone in Parthey's Notitiæ episcopatuum, in which it figures from the 6th to the 12fth or 13th century.

Cestrus

Cestrus was a city in the Roman province of Isauria, in Asia Minor. Its placing within Isauria is given by Hierocles, Georgius Cyprius, and Parthey's (Notitiae episcopatuum). While recognizing what the ancient sources said, Lequien supposed that the town, whose site has not been identified, took its name from the River Cestros and was thus in Pamphylia. Following Lequien's hypothesis, the 19th-century annual publication Gerarchia cattolica identified the town with "Ak-Sou", which Sophrone Pétridès called an odd mistake, since this is the name of the River Cestros, not of a city.

Cotenna

Cotenna was a city in the Roman province of Pamphylia I in Asia Minor. It corresponds to modern Gödene, near Konya, Turkey.

Demaratus

Demaratus, or Demaratos (Greek: Δημάρατος), was a king of Sparta from around 510 until 491 BC, 15th of the Eurypontid line, successor to his father Ariston. As king, he is known chiefly for his opposition to the other, co-ruling Spartan king, Cleomenes I. He later migrated to Achaemenid Persia where he was given asylum and land, and fought on the Persian side during the Second Persian invasion of Greece.

Docimium

Docimium, Docimia or Docimeium (Greek: Δοκίμια and Δοκίμειον) was an ancient city of Phrygia, Asia Minor where there were famous marble quarries.

Drizipara

Drizipara (or Druzipara, Drousipara. Drusipara) now Karıştıran (Büyükkarıştıran) in Lüleburgaz district was a city and a residential episcopal see in the Roman province of Europa in the civil diocese of Thrace. It is now a titular see of the Catholic Church.

Eurysthenes (Pergamon)

Eurysthenes (Greek: Εὐρυσθένης, circa 400 BC) was a descendant of the Spartan king Demaratus.

After his deposition in 491 BC, Demaratus had fled to Persia, where king Darius I made him ruler of the cities of Pergamon, Teuthrania and Halisarna. About a hundred years later Eurysthenes and his brother Procles reigned over the same cities; their joint rule is at least attested for the year 399 BC.

Halisarna

Halisarna (Ancient Greek: Ἁλίσαρνα) was a town of ancient Mysia on the north bank of the river Caïcus. The nearby towns of Halisarna, Pergamum, and Teuthrania had been given by the Persian king Darius I to the Spartan king Demaratus about the year 486 BCE for his help in the expedition against Greece. Demaratus's descendants continued to rule these cities at the beginning of the 4th century BCE. During the withdrawal of Pergamum from The March of the Ten Thousand, it was attacked by, among others, troops from Halisarna and Teuthrania under command of Procles, son of Demaratus. In the Hellenica, Xenophon relates that Halisarna, together with Pergamum, Teuthrania, Gambrium, Palaegambrium, Myrina and Gryneium were delivered by their rulers to the army that, under the command of the Spartan Thimbron, around the year 399 BCE, had come to the area to try to liberate the Greek colonies from the Persian domain.Its site is located near modern Eğrigöltepe, in Asiatic Turkey.

Hisarlik

Hisarlik (Turkish: Hisarlık, "Place of Fortresses"), often spelled Hissarlik, is the modern name for an ancient city in modern day located in what is now Turkey (historically Anatolia) near to the modern city of Çanakkale. The unoccupied archaeological site lies approximately 6.5 km from the Aegean Sea and about the same distance from the Dardanelles. The archaeological site of Hisarlik is known in archaeological circles as a tell. A tell is an artificial hill, built up over centuries and millennia of occupation from its original site on a bedrock knob.

It is believed by many scholars to be the site of ancient Troy, also known as Ilion.

Lyrbe

Lyrbe (spelled Lyrba in the 1910 Catholic Encyclopedia; Ancient Greek: Λύρβη) was a city and episcopal see in the Roman province of Pamphylia Prima and is now a titular see.

Parthenopeus

For the hero of mediaeval romance, see Partonopeus de Blois

In Greek mythology, Parthenopeus or Parthenopaeus (; Ancient Greek: Παρθενοπαῖος, Parthenopaῖos) was one of the Seven Against Thebes, a native of Arcadia, described as young and outstandingly good-looking, but at the same time arrogant, ruthless and over-confident, although an unproblematic ally for the Argives.

Potamoi

The Potamoi (Greek: Ποταμοί, "Rivers") are the gods of rivers and streams of the earth in Greek mythology.

Prokles (Pergamon)

Prokles (circa 400 BC) was a descendant of the exiled Spartan king Demaratus, and ruler of Pergamon in Asia Minor under the Achaemenid Empire. He was a brother of Eurysthenes, with whom he was a joint ruler.

After his deposition in 491 BC Demaratus had fled to Persia, where king Darius I made him ruler of the cities of Pergamon, Teuthrania and Halisarna. About a hundred years later Eurysthenes and his brother Prokles reigned over the same cities; their joint rule is at least attested for the year 399 BC.Xenophon and the Ten Thousand received some support from Prokles in facing Achaemenid troops, at the beginning of their campaign into Asia Minor. According to Xenophon (Anabasis, 7.8.8-17), when he arrived in Mysia in 399, he met Hellas, the widow of Gongylos and probably daughter of Themistocles, who was living at Pergamon. His two sons, Gorgion and Gongylos the younger, ruled respectively over the cities of Gambrium, Palaegambrium for Gorgion, and Myrina and Grynium for Gongylos. Xenophon received some support from the descendants of Gongylos for his campaign into Asia Minor, as well as from the descendants of Demaratos, a Spartan exile who also had become a satrap for the Achaemenids, in the person of his descendant Prokles.The coinage of Prokles displays one of the earliest portraits of a Greek ruler on a coin.The city of Pergamon was later taken over by the Spartan general Thibron, who was fighting against the Achaemenid Satrap of Lydia and Ionia Tissaphernes.

Stratonicea (Lydia)

Stratonicea – (Greek: Στρατoνικεια, or Στρατονίκεια) also transliterated as Stratoniceia and Stratonikeia, earlier Indi, and later for a time Hadrianapolis – was an ancient city in the valley of the Caicus river, between Germe and Acrasus, in Lydia, Anatolia; its site is currently near the village of Siledik, in the district of Kırkağaç, Manisa Province, in the Aegean Region of Turkey.

Tecmessa

The name Tecmessa (Ancient Greek: Τέκμησσα, Tékmēssa) refers to the following characters in Greek mythology:

Tecmessa, daughter of Teuthras, king of Teuthrania in Mysia, or Teleutas, king of Phrygia. During the Trojan War, Telamonian Ajax kills Tecmessa's father and takes her captive; his reason for doing so may have been, as the 1st century BC Roman poet, Horace, wrote, that Ajax was captivated by Tecmessa's beauty. In Sophocles’ Ajax, Tecmessa unsuccessfully tries to dissuade Ajax from committing suicide. She is the first to find his corpse, which she promptly covers with her own clothing to prevent further heartache. Their infant son, Eurysaces, however, survives the incident.

Tecmessa, one of the Amazons killed by Heracles in his quest for the girdle of Hippolyte.

Teuthras

In Greek mythology, Teuthras (Τεύθρας, gen. Τεύθραντος) was a king of Mysia, and mythological eponym of the town of Teuthrania.

Thymena

Thymena (Ancient Greek: Θύμηνα), also called Thymaena or Teuthrania (Τευθρανία), was a town on the Black Sea coast of ancient Paphlagonia, at a distance of 90 stadia from Aegialus.It is located near Uğurlu in Asiatic Turkey.

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