Terra Branford

Terra Branford, known as Tina Branford (ティナ・ブランフォード Tina Buranfōdo) in Japanese media, is a character in the Final Fantasy series of role-playing video games published by Square Enix. Designed by Yoshitaka Amano and Tetsuya Nomura for the main series installment Final Fantasy VI, she also appeared in the spin-off fighting games Dissidia Final Fantasy and Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy, and made small appearances in several other games in and outside the Final Fantasy series.

In Final Fantasy VI, Terra is one of the protagonists. She is the daughter of a human and a magic creature known as an "Esper." Mentally enslaved by the antagonistic Gestahlian Empire, which exploits her magic powers for militaristic purposes, she is rescued by rebels at the beginning of the game. The character was very well received by journalists and fans alike.

Terra Branford
Final Fantasy character
Terra Branford N
Terra as seen in Dissidia: Final Fantasy
(a concept art by Tetsuya Nomura)
First appearanceFinal Fantasy VI (1994)
Designed byYoshitaka Amano
Tetsuya Nomura
Voiced by

Appearances

Final Fantasy VI

Terra is the first introduced character, a mentally-enslaved Imperial super-soldier gifted with devastating magic. She is tasked to the Magitek-armored assault on Narshe, slaughtering most of the town's militia in pursuit of a recently unearthed frozen Esper. Upon encountering the creature, her Imperial contingent is annihilated together with her armor. She wakes in Arvis' home, freed of her slave crown and suffering amnesia.[1] Pursued into the depths of Narshe's mines by local forces, she is eventually rescued by Locke (a member of the Returners) and a horde of moogles.[2] After experiencing events in the Figaro kingdom and after another Imperial assault on Narshe to claim the Esper, she eventually learns that she is the daughter of an Esper father and human mother, explaining her natural magical abilities. Brain-washed, extensively trained and manipulated, she had been instrumental in the Empire's subjugation of the other city-states on the southern continent, her powers even decimating fifty Imperial troops in moments.[3] Instrumental in the Returner's strategy to ally with the Espers beyond the sealed gate, Terra succeeds in opening the barrier between worlds and unintentionally unleashes the Espers' devastating obliteration of the Empire.

Now in a post-apocalyptic world, Terra is found bereft of her fighting spirit, having taken on the mantle of a mother figure for the orphans of Mobliz. Ultimately, she fails to stop the attack of a legendary demon known as Humbaba, requiring the party's intervention.[4][5] Returning later on, the player finds her willing to stand up against Humbaba, joining the player in the fight and avowing to make the world safe for children.[6] At the game's conclusion, expected to fade from existence with the remaining Espers, Terra is informed by the Magicite remnant of her father, Maduin, that so long as some human element of her remains anchored in the world, she will continue to exist.[7]

Other appearances

Terra is the heroine representing Final Fantasy VI in Dissidia: Final Fantasy, a crossover fighting game featuring characters from the series. She was redesigned by Tetsuya Nomura and sports both blonde hair in her default appearance and green hair in her alternate appearance. She returns in Dissidia 012: Final Fantasy as a slaved enemy during the first Dissidia's backstory, and again in the next follow-up game, Dissidia Final Fantasy NT.

Terra makes a cameo in Secret of Evermore, represents Final Fantasy VI in Theatrhythm Final Fantasy[8] and its sequel Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call, appears as a Legendary character in Final Fantasy Airborne Brigade, appears as one of the random purchasable Premium characters in the shop in Final Fantasy: All the Bravest,[9] is mentioned in Final Fantasy XIII-2, is represented by several cards in Final Fantasy Trading Card Game, and is playable in Final Fantasy Record Keeper. Her outfit appears as in-game avatar parts in Kingdom Hearts Re:coded.

Merchandise items of the character such as a gashapon figurine were produced for Final Fantasy VI.[10] She is featured in the technical demo Final Fantasy VI: The Interactive CG Game.[11]

Development

The character that would become Terra Branford was initially conceived as a half-esper young man in his early 20s.[12] He was a partner and rival of the dark, mysterious Locke Cole.[13] The character's design was eventually changed to that of a half-esper female who is 18 years old in the final version of Final Fantasy VI. Terra was written as a "very passive" character in the first half of the game, in order to show growth as the story progresses. At the end of the game, Terra was supposed to die along with the disappearance of magic, but the development team decided that it would be excessive as she had asserted her human side by that point in the story, so the staff decided to have her stay alive, without her magic side.[12]

Terra was originally designed by Yoshitaka Amano, who drew concept art of her. Tetsuya Nomura, one of the game's graphic directors, redesigned her in chibi form for her representation in the game.[14] Some of the differences is that her ingame appearance has green hair, as opposed to the original blonde. In a 2006 interview, Amano stated that Terra was his favorite character to design in the video game industry.[15] The development team intended for the game to have an ensemble cast, with no unique protagonist; however, since the first half of the game revolves heavily around Terra, the team decided to have the second half start with another character, Celes Chere. Another reason for this shift is that the team wanted Terra's story arc to progress in a new direction after the first half.[16]

Although the character's name is "Tina Branford" in Japanese media, American playtesters "hated the name Tina, almost to a person!", according to the game's translator Ted Woolsey. For this reason, and to avoid "disappointment or confusion" in case a player's name in the United States was also Tina, Woolsey renamed the character "Terra" in the North American English version of the game. In retrospect, he acknowledged that some players might also have been named Terra and that some people disliked the name change; however, he noted that the games he worked on "were meant for a broader audience than the one which buys and plays Japanese imports", and that players who know Japanese should play the original versions.[17]

In Dissidia Final Fantasy, Terra was chosen by Nomura as the representative hero for Final Fantasy VI. His reasoning was that without her, there would be no female hero character in the game's roster. He also noted that "based on [his] feelings" from Final Fantasy VI's production, he "thought it had to be Terra", as she appeared on the original game's cover art and advertisement. Gameplay-wise, Terra is Nomura's favorite character in Dissidia Final Fantasy.[14]

Reception

The character was very well received, especially among the Japanese fans of Final Fantasy. Even as Terra does not form a couple with any character in Final Fantasy VI, "Terra and Edgar" and "Terra and Locke" were voted;[19] that same year, she was ranked sixth in a V Jump's poll for the most popular characters in the series.[20] In a 2013 poll by Square Enix, Terra was voted the sixth most popular Final Fantasy female character in Japan.[21] In an article about Dissidia Final Fantasy, IGN editor Ryan Clements called her one of the most recognizable and well-loved characters to join the army of Cosmos.[22]

In 1996, Next Generation chose the scene of Terra learning to love again by taking care of a village of orphaned children as the most memorable moment in the entire Final Fantasy series up to that point, stating "it's safe to say that no other game series has tackled such big issues, or reached such a level of emotional complexity. It truly is beautiful."[23] In 2013, Gus Turner of Complex ranked Terra as the fifth greatest Final Fantasy character of all time, calling her "a benchmark for all female protagonists in the series, made unique by the multi-dimensional aspects of her personality and backstory," and stating "what characters like Yuna and Aeris continued, Terra started."[24] Also in 2013, Michael Rougeau of Complex ranked her as the ninth greatest female lead character in video game history, calling her "one of the most compelling and complex heroines in gaming" and declaring her a much better female Final Fantasy protagonist than Final Fantasy XIII's Lightning.[25] That same year, Tom's Guide's Marshall Honorof included her among top ten female protagonists in video game history.[18] Entertainment Weekly's Darren Franich listed her as one of "15 Kick-Ass Women in Videogames", asserting that "Going through a Django-like transformation from brainwashed slave to active hero, she's far more interesting than the simple Madonna-whore dichotomy of Final Fantasy VII's Aeris and Tifa."[26]

See also

References

  1. ^ Arvis: Easy, there! This is a slave crown. The others were using it to control you. It was robbing you of your thoughts – making it so you'd do whatever they told you. Girl: I can't remember a thing... Arvis: Don't worry. It'll all come back to you... In time, that is. Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  2. ^ Arvis: The city guard is pursuing her as we speak. This city has the strength to stand up to the Empire, but it won't use it. The people are just too stubbornly independent to join an underground resistance group like the Returners. I tried to explain that the Empire was controlling the girl, but they wouldn't even listen... Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  3. ^ Banon: Carrier pigeons have kept me informed. I also heard that she wiped out fifty Imperial soldiers in mere minutes... Terra: No, that's not...! Locke: Terra! Edgar: For heaven's sake, Banon! This girl doesn't remember anything! Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  4. ^ Terra: I don't know why these kids need me... And it's not like there's anything forcing me to protect them. It's the strangest feeling... But once that feeling took root inside of me, I lost the strength to keep on fighting. Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  5. ^ Terra: Humbaba...the ancient monster released from the depths of the earth by the cataclysm... I have to protect the village! Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  6. ^ Terra: Thank you... You all helped me understand what it means...to love. I'll fight! I'll make this world a place where life can flourish, and children can grow up in peace! Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  7. ^ Terra: Father...? Maduin: Terra...we must part now. We espers will disappear from this world. You may fade away as well... But, perhaps if the human part of you feels something strong enough, then maybe...just maybe you will be able to remain here as a human. Square Enix Final Fantasy VI Advance (in English) 2007-02-05
  8. ^ Evan Narcisse, Why Stressed-Out Final Fantasy Characters Probably Love Theatrhythm Archived 2013-12-20 at the Wayback Machine, Kotaku, 7/17/12.
  9. ^ James Gilmour, Cloud and Terra together at last in Final Fantasy: All The Bravest Archived 2016-04-04 at the Wayback Machine, Pocket Gamer, 16 January 2013.
  10. ^ EGM2 5 (November 1994) page 96
  11. ^ Oxford, Nadia (May 12, 2007). "Everyone's Fantasies: Final Fantasy's Journey from Niche to Megahit". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on November 3, 2011.
  12. ^ a b "FFコロシアム" [FF Colosseum]. V Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha. September 1994. pp. 186–189. Lay summary.
  13. ^ "FFコロシアム" [FF Colosseum]. V Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha. October 1994. pp. 190–193. Lay summary.
  14. ^ a b Studio BentStuff, ed. (January 29, 2009). "Chapter EX Director Section II Part 6". Dissidia Final Fantasy Ultimania. Ultimania (in Japanese). Square Enix. pp. 696–699. ISBN 978-4-7575-2488-0.
  15. ^ Mielke, James; Minamoto, Hiroko (July 20, 2006). "A Day in the Life of Final Fantasy's Yoshitaka Amano". 1UP.com. p. 5. Archived from the original on 2016-09-07. Retrieved August 9, 2006.
  16. ^ "FFコロシアム" [FF Colosseum]. V Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha. January 1995. pp. 208–211. Lay summary.
  17. ^ Rork, Bob (May 7, 1997). "Bob Rork Woolsey Interview". Chrono Compendium. Archived from the original on July 13, 2006. Retrieved August 9, 2006.
  18. ^ a b Marshall Honorof, Top 10 Video Game Female Protagonists Archived 2013-08-23 at the Wayback Machine, Tom's Guide, August 20, 2013.
  19. ^ "人気投票" [Popularity Poll]. V Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha. November 1995. pp. 186–189. Lay summary.
  20. ^ "人気投票" [Popularity Poll]. V Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha. December 1995. pp. 184–187. Lay summary.
  21. ^ "Square Enix Poll: Favorite Female Final Fantasy Character". Anime News Network. 2013-01-17. Archived from the original on 2013-01-21. Retrieved 2013-01-21.
  22. ^ Clements, Ryan (July 30, 2009). "Dissidia Final Fantasy: Terra". IGN. Retrieved August 6, 2009.
  23. ^ Next Generation 21 (September 1996), p.68.
  24. ^ "Terra Branford — The 20 Greatest Final Fantasy Characters of All Time". Complex. 2013-10-08. Archived from the original on 2013-10-12. Retrieved 2013-12-18.
  25. ^ Michael Rougeau, The 50 Greatest Heroines In Video Game History Archived 2013-03-07 at the Wayback Machine, Complex.com, March 14, 2013.
  26. ^ Darren Franich (March 5, 2013). "15 Kick-Ass Women in Videogames". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Archived from the original on April 16, 2014. Retrieved April 21, 2014.
Characters of Final Fantasy IX

The characters of the PlayStation role-playing game Final Fantasy IX. Filling four CD-ROMs, Final Fantasy IX featured a cast containing a variety of major and minor characters. Players could control a maximum of four characters for combat at once, with eight main playable characters in the party and a few other, temporary characters.

Characters of Final Fantasy VI

Square's role-playing video game Final Fantasy VI (released as Final Fantasy III in North America) features fourteen permanent player characters, the largest number of any game in the main Final Fantasy series, as well as a number of characters who are only briefly controlled by the player.

Characters of Final Fantasy VIII

Final Fantasy VIII, a 1999 best-selling role-playing video game by Squaresoft, features an elite group of mercenaries called "SeeD", as well as soldiers, rebels, and political leaders of various nations and cities. Thirteen weeks after its release, Final Fantasy VIII had earned more than US$50 million in sales, making it the fastest selling Final Fantasy title at the time. The game has shipped 8.15 million units worldwide as of March 2003. Additionally, Final Fantasy VIII was voted the 22nd-best game of all time by readers of the Japanese magazine Famitsu in 2006. The game's characters were created by Tetsuya Nomura, and are the first in the series to be realistically proportioned in all aspects of the game. This graphical shift, as well as the cast itself, has received generally positive reviews from gaming magazines and websites.The six main playable characters in Final Fantasy VIII are Squall Leonhart, a loner who avoids vulnerability by focusing on his duty; Rinoa Heartilly, an outspoken and passionate young woman who follows her heart; Quistis Trepe, an instructor with a serious yet patient attitude; Zell Dincht, an energetic martial artist with a fondness for hot dogs; Selphie Tilmitt, a cheerful girl who loves trains and flies the airship Ragnarok; and Irvine Kinneas, a marksman and womanizer who uses his charm to mask his insecurities. Temporarily playable characters include Laguna Loire, Kiros Seagill, and Ward Zabac, who appear in "flashback" sequences; SeeD cadet-turned-antagonist Seifer Almasy; and sorceress Edea Kramer. The main antagonist is Ultimecia, a sorceress from the future who wishes to compress time.

Characters of Final Fantasy XII

Final Fantasy XII, a role-playing video game released by Square Enix in 2006, revolves around the attempt to liberate the kingdom of Dalmasca from the Archadian Empire. The story is told through the eyes of Vaan, an orphan who wishes to be a sky pirate, and the cadre of other characters he encounters throughout the adventure. The visuals of the characters were designed by Akihiko Yoshida, while their stories were created by Yasumi Matsuno. The characters were designed to look and behave unlike any that had existed in the Final Fantasy series. Their stories were written to create a script where neither side was truly right or wrong, but instead just had different opinions and interpretations of the events occurring in the game.

There are a total of six main playable characters in Final Fantasy XII; Vaan, an energetic orphan of Rabanastre who dreams of becoming a sky pirate; Ashe, a determined princess of Dalmasca who lost her husband in the Archadian invasion; Basch, a disgraced knight of Dalmasca charged with treason for slaying the king; Balthier, a gentlemanly sky pirate who pilots his airship, the Strahl; Fran, Balthier's partner and a viera exile whose knowledge extends to legends and myths; and Penelo, Vaan's childhood friend who accompanies him in journeys to keep an eye over him. There is also a number of "Guest" characters, who temporarily join the main party at various points in the plotline, such as Larsa, the young prince of Archadia, Vossler, a member of the resistance against the Archadian Empire, and Reddas, a disillusioned former Magistrate of Archadia. Other major characters who influence the plot of the game but are not playable characters include Vayne, the eldest prince of Archadia and main antagonist of the story, Gabranth, the twin brother of Basch, and Cid, a brilliant scientist and father to Balthier.

The characters in the game have been the basis of several pieces of merchandise produced by Square Enix, such as statues, action figures, and jewelry. They have been subject to mixed reviews; some reviews have applauded the characters' dialogue and relationships to each other, while others dismissed the story and characters as uninteresting. Critiques of the voice acting for the characters has also been mixed, with different reviews either praising or criticizing both the acting and the technical quality of the recordings.

Characters of Final Fantasy XV

Final Fantasy XV, an action role-playing video game released in November 2016, is the fifteenth main installment in the Final Fantasy series, and is thematically connected to Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy, a subseries of games linked by a common mythos which includes Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy Type-0. The world and main characters were created by Tetsuya Nomura, the game's original director. Nomura also designed the main characters, with later revisions and additional characters being designed by Yusuke Naora: other character designers involved with the game included Roberto Ferrari and Yusaku Nakaaki.

The story revolves around a conflict between Lucis, the last free kingdom in the world, and the expansionist empire of Niflheim. The main protagonist is Noctis Lucis Caelum, sole heir to the throne of Lucis. On his journey, he is accompanied by three companions: Gladiolus Amicitia, a brother-figure from a noble family sworn to Noctis's protection; Ignis Scientia, Noctis's strategist; and Prompto Argentum, a friend of Noctis from a lower-class family. A key character is Lunafreya Nox Fleuret, Noctis's fiancée through an arranged marriage. Other characters include Noctis's father Regis, the king of Lucis; Cor Leonis, a famous warrior of Lucis; Gentiana, Lunafreya's companion and attendant; Cindy, who with her grandfather Cid acts as mechanic for Noctis' car; and Iris, Gladiolus's sister. The game's main antagonist Ardyn Izuna is supported by the forces of Niflheim under emperor Iedolas Aldercapt and his chief scientist Verstael Besithia, Lunafreya's brother Ravus Nox Fleuret, and the mercenary dragoon Aranea Highwind.

Originally a spin-off game titled Final Fantasy Versus XIII, the game changed multiple times during its ten-year development cycle, including the redesign or removal of characters and story elements. Additional media and merchandise based upon the world and characters of XV have been produced, with its expanded media being dubbed the "Final Fantasy XV Universe": these include the original net animation Brotherhood: Final Fantasy XV and the CGI feature film Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV.

Characters of Final Fantasy X and X-2

The tenth game of the Final Fantasy series, Square's 2001 bestselling role-playing video game Final Fantasy X features several fictional characters designed by Tetsuya Nomura who wanted the main characters' designs and names to be connected with their personalities and roles in the plot. The game takes place in the fictional universe of Spira that features multiple tribes. The game's sequel released in 2003, Final Fantasy X-2, takes place two years after the events in Final Fantasy X and uses new and returning characters.

There are seven main playable characters in Final Fantasy X starting with Tidus, a skilled blitzball player from Zanarkand who is lost in the world of Spira after an encounter with an enormous creature called Sin and searches for a way home. He joins the summoner Yuna who travels towards the Zanarkand's ruins in order defeat Sin alongside her guardians: Kimahri Ronso, a member of the Ronso tribe; Wakka, the captain of the blitzball team in Besaid; Lulu, a stoic black mage; Auron, a famous warrior and an old acquaintance of Tidus; and Rikku, Yuna's cousin who searches for a way to avoid Yuna's sacrifice in the fight against Sin. The leader of the Guado tribe, Seymour Guado, briefly joins the party for a fight but is then revealed as an antagonist in his quest to replace Tidus' father, Jecht, to become the new Sin. Final Fantasy X-2 features Yuna, Rikku, and the newly introduced Paine as playable characters in their quest to find spheres across Spira and find clues regarding Tidus' current location. During their journey, they meet Paine's former comrades who are related with the spirit of an avenger named Shuyin.

The creation of these characters brought the Square staff several challenges as Final Fantasy X was the first game in the franchise to feature voice acting and also had to feature multiple tribes from different parts from Spira with distinctive designs. Various types of merchandising have also been released. The characters from Final Fantasy X and its sequel were praised by video game publications owing to their personalities and designs. The English voice acting received a mixed response during their debut while in Final Fantasy X-2 the dub received a better response.

Characters of the Final Fantasy IV series

Final Fantasy IV, a role-playing video game released by Square in 1991, revolves Cecil Harvey, a knight of Baron who embarks on a quest to defeat Golbez, a man that is controlling the king of Baron. During Cecil's quest, he is joined by his childhood friends Kain Highwind and Rosa Farrell, as well as other warriors from around the world who also seek to stop Golbez. The visuals of the characters were designed by Yoshitaka Amano. After its initial release, Final Fantasy IV was later ported to multiple consoles. In 2007, Square Enix released an enhanced remake for the Nintendo DS that added voice acting to both the Japanese and English versions.

The game's 2008 sequel, Final Fantasy IV: The After Years is set seventeen years after Final Fantasy IV and includes most of the characters from the original game as well as introducing several new characters. The story of The After Years primarily revolves around Ceodore Harvey, the son of Cecil and Rosa. In 2011, a third game in the series was released. Set one year after Final Fantasy IV and sixteen years prior to The After Years, Final Fantasy IV Interlude, was released for the PlayStation Portable, and featured several of the original Final Fantasy IV protagonists.

As Final Fantasy IV was the first game in the series on the Super Famicom, character designer Yoshitaka Amano took advantage of the console's graphical capabilities, designing much more elaborate characters than prior entries. Lead designer Takashi Tokita noted how he and the staff worked in making all of the game's cast fit into the story. The characters were well received by video game publications with several of them finding the cast innovative thanks to their characterization.

Characters of the Final Fantasy Type-0 universe

Final Fantasy Type-0, an action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix in 2011, revolves around a war between four nations in the world of Orience. An episodic companion game, Final Fantasy Agito, was released in 2014. Type-0 was re-released internationally in 2015 as a high-definition remaster for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The main protagonists are Class Zero, a group of students at the magical academy in Rubrum. The story is told through two new members of Class Zero: Machina Kunagiri and Rem Tokimiya. The main character of Agito is a player-created cadet at the Rubrum magical academy. The world and characters were designed by Yusuke Naora, Yusaku Nakaaki and Tetsuya Nomura. Their stories were created by Hajime Tabata, Hiroki Chiba and Sarah Obake.

The main characters are the twelve members of Class Zero: Ace, Deuce, Trey, Cater, Cinque, Sice, Seven, Eight, Nine, Jack, Queen and King. Alongside them are Machina Kunagiri and Rem Tokimiya, old friends who are assigned to Class Zero shortly after the events of the game begin. A guest character is Kurasame Susaya, Class Zero's tutor and a veteran warrior. Other major characters include Arecia Al-Rashia, head of the Rubrum Academy's magical department and a key figure in Orience's lore; Cid Aulstyne, the leader of Milites Empire and the game's main antagonist; and Joker and Tiz, two characters who observe the events of the games.

The concept, which was set within the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis subseries, was for a much darker scenario than other Final Fantasy games. The main cast were designed by Nomura and Naora, while side characters were handled by Nakaaki. Multiple pieces of merchandise and additional media have been created around the characters, including trading cards and multiple manga. They have been the subject of positive reviews in Japan and import reviews: the main praise has gone to their interactions and writing, while the main criticism was difficulties arising from handling the large cast. Western reviews were also generally positive about the character portrayals, but there were criticisms about dialogue, character interactions, and the quality of the localization.

Characters of the Final Fantasy VII series

Final Fantasy VII, a role-playing video game developed by Square (now Square Enix) and originally released in 1997, features a large number of fictional characters in both major and minor roles. VII has been followed by multiple sequels and prequels, grouped into the multimedia series Compilation of Final Fantasy VII: these include the 2004 mobile game Before Crisis, the 2005 movie sequel Advent Children, the 2006 shooter spinoff Dirge of Cerberus, and the 2007 action game Crisis Core. Other media include spin-off books and the original video animation Last Order. The setting of Final Fantasy VII is a world that has been described as an industrial or post-industrial science fiction setting. It is referred to as "the Planet" in most of the games, and was retroactively named "Gaia" in some Square Enix promotional material.VII follows Cloud Strife, a troubled mercenary who joins with an eco-terrorist group to stop Shinra from draining the life of the Planet to use as an energy source. As the story progresses, conflicts escalate and the world's safety becomes their central concern as new forces emerge to challenge the original group. Cloud and his team eventually face off against the game's antagonist, Sephiroth. Other important characters in the series include Aerith Gainsborough, a flower seller who becomes a good friend to Cloud; Zack Fair, Cloud's friend, a former soldier of Shinra and the protagonist of Crisis Core; and Vincent Valentine, a man made immortal by Shinra experimentation and the protagonist of Dirge of Cerberus. The conflict between Cloud and Sephiroth forms the core narrative around which many of the series' stories are built. Other characters include the Turks, a covert group which originally worked for Shinra.

The original characters were designed by Tetsuya Nomura, who had done monster designs for Final Fantasy VI and was chosen for the role after his designs impressed producer Hironobu Sakaguchi. Nomura was responsible for many of the characters and their stories. The scenario for the original game was written by Sakaguchi, Yoshinori Kitase and Kazushige Nojima. Nomura, Kitase and Nojima have been involved in other titles in the Compilation. The characters of VII have met with positive reception in contemporary and modern reviews, while their portrayal in the Compilation titles has been mixed: while Crisis Core was generally praised, the focus on secondary characters in Dirge of Cerberus drew mixed opinions from some, while their appearance in Advent Children was generally cited as confusing or poor for newcomers to the series. The entire cast, along with multiple side characters and villains, have remained popular among critics and series fans over the years, with many lists and opinion polls citing them as some of the best characters in the Final Fantasy series.

Characters of the Final Fantasy XIII series

Final Fantasy XIII - a role-playing game released by Square Enix in 2009 - revolves around the struggles of a group of humans over a predestined fate. The game's two sequels, Final Fantasy XIII-2 and Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII, build on the first game's story and mythos. In video game publications and among the staff at Square Enix, the three games have come to be referred to as the "Lightning Saga", and the core concepts they contain are drawn from the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis subseries. The visuals of the original characters were designed by Tetsuya Nomura and Nao Ikeda, while many later characters were created by other designers, including Hideo Minaba, Yusuke Naora and Toshiyuki Itahana. Their original stories were created by Motomu Toriyama and written up by Daisuke Watanabe.

The series' central characters are Lightning, a former soldier and the core character in all three games; Serah Farron, Lightning's sister; Snow Villiers, an optimistic young man engaged to Serah; Hope Estheim, a young man who develops a strong bond with Lightning; Sazh Katzroy, a former airship pilot; Oerba Dia Vanille and Oerba Yun Fang, two women who inadvertently set the first game's events in motion. Three further characters appear in XIII-2: Noel Kreiss, a hunter who sets out to change his bleak future; Caius Ballad, a man from Noel's past who wishes to bring about a predestined apocalypse; and Paddra Nsu-Yeul, a seeress reincarnated through history. In Lightning Returns, two more are added: Lumina, a doppelganger of Serah; and Bhunivelze, the main deity of the Final Fantasy XIII universe.

The characters in the games have been the basis of several pieces of merchandise produced by Square Enix, such as statues, action figures, apparel, and jewelry. They have been subject to mostly positive reviews; most observers favorably compared the characters to those in the previous games and praised the voice acting, however some critics have stated that the plot line of the characters have been confusing when introduced. In XIII-2, the shift to new or secondary characters and the change in importance and story role of the previous game's main cast grated with some reviewers, while others applauded the new characters' development and interactions. In Lightning Returns, the characters' stories were often criticized for being underdeveloped, or simply included for the sake of ending their stories.

Dissidia Final Fantasy

Dissidia Final Fantasy (ディシディア ファイナルファンタジー, Dishidia Fainaru Fantajī) is a fighting game with action RPG elements developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable as part of the campaign for the Final Fantasy series' 20th anniversary. It was released in Japan on December 18, 2008, in North America on August 25, 2009, in Australia on September 3, 2009 and in Europe on September 4, 2009. It was then re-released as an international version in Japan, based on the North American port, as Dissidia Final Fantasy: Universal Tuning, on November 1, 2009.

The game features characters from different Final Fantasy games and centers on a great conflict between Cosmos, goddess of harmony, and Chaos, the god of discord. The two summon multiple warriors to fight for their sides in their thirteenth war. During the story, the player controls the ten warriors chosen by Cosmos, the protagonists from the first ten Final Fantasy games, in their journey. The game's English and international versions also give access to other features such an arcade mode.

Dissidia originated from Kingdom Hearts director Tetsuya Nomura's desire to create a spin-off for the franchise, but it was changed to the Final Fantasy series. Besides designing the characters, Nomura worked with the Square staff with the desire to make it appealing to Western players. Dissidia was well received commercially and critically, with positive reviews and sales of over 1.8 million. A follow-up titled Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy was released in March 2011, and features several new characters and gameplay features.

Dissidia Final Fantasy NT

Dissidia Final Fantasy NT is a fighting game with action role-playing elements developed by Koei Tecmo's Team Ninja and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation 4. The game is a follow-up to Dissidia Final Fantasy and Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy, released for PlayStation Portable, and similarly allows players to battle one another using many characters from the Final Fantasy series. The game is a console port of the 2015 Japanese arcade game Dissidia Final Fantasy, and it released worldwide in January 2018.

Final Fantasy VI

Final Fantasy VI, also known as Final Fantasy III from its marketing for initial North American release in 1994, is a role-playing video game developed and published by Japanese company Square for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Final Fantasy VI, being the sixth game in the series proper, was the first to be directed by someone other than producer and series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi; the role was filled instead by Yoshinori Kitase and Hiroyuki Ito. Yoshitaka Amano, long-time collaborator to the Final Fantasy series, returned as the character designer and contributed widely to visual concept design, while series-regular, composer Nobuo Uematsu, wrote the game's score, which has been released on several soundtrack albums. Set in a fantasy world with a technology level equivalent to that of the Second Industrial Revolution, the game's story follows an expanding cast that includes fourteen permanent playable characters. The drama includes and extends past depicting a rebellion against an evil military dictatorship, pursuit of a magical arms-race, use of chemical weapons in warfare, depiction of violent, apocalyptic confrontations with Divinities, several personal redemption arcs, teenage pregnancy, and the continuous renewal of hope and life itself.

Final Fantasy VI was released to critical acclaim and is seen as a landmark title for the role-playing genre; for instance, it was ranked as the 2nd best RPG of all time by IGN in 2017. Its SNES and PlayStation versions have sold over 3.48 million copies worldwide to date as a stand-alone game, as well as over 750,000 copies as part of the Japanese Final Fantasy Collection and the North American Final Fantasy Anthology. Final Fantasy VI has won numerous awards and is considered by many to be one of the greatest video games of all time.

It was ported by Tose with minor differences to Sony's PlayStation in 1999 and Nintendo's Game Boy Advance in 2006, and it was released for the Wii's Virtual Console in 2011. Nintendo re-released Final Fantasy VI in the United States in September 2017 as part of the company's Super NES Classic Edition. The game was known as Final Fantasy III when it was first released in North America, as the original Final Fantasy II, Final Fantasy III, and Final Fantasy V had not been released outside Japan at the time (leaving IV as the second title released outside Japan and VI as the third). However, most later localizations use the original title.

Final Symphony

Final Symphony is a symphonic concert tour first held at the Historische Stadthalle Wuppertal in Wuppertal (Germany) on May 11, 2013. To date, it has seen 22 performances worldwide. The concert tour features arrangements of video game music selected from the Final Fantasy series, specifically Final Fantasy VI, VII, and X. It is divided into three acts: a symphonic poem for VI, a piano concerto for X, and a symphony for VII. The concert is produced and directed by Thomas Böcker, with arrangements provided by Finnish composer and musician Jonne Valtonen, along with Roger Wanamo and Final Fantasy X composer Masashi Hamauzu with consultation from Final Fantasy composer Nobuo Uematsu. The original works were composed by Uematsu and Hamauzu, and an introductory piece was composed by Valtonen. The premiere concert was performed by the Wuppertal Symphony Orchestra under conduction from Eckehard Stier, with guest performer Benyamin Nuss joining the orchestra on piano.

Following the initial performance, Final Symphony was performed in several other venues. It was first performed in London (United Kingdom) at the Barbican Centre by the London Symphony Orchestra on May 30, 2013. Between 2014 and 2018, additional concerts took place in Tokyo (Japan), Aarhus (Denmark), Stockholm (Sweden), Tampere (Finland), Amsterdam (Netherlands), San Diego (United States), Baltimore (United States), San Francisco (United States), Auckland (New Zealand), Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China), Hamburg (Germany), Berlin (Germany), Munich (Germany), Vienna (Austria) and Melbourne (Australia), with each performance location handled by a different orchestra.

A video of the Stockholm performance of the Final Fantasy VI Symphonic Poem was released on October 11, 2014, and a full album recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra at Abbey Road Studios was released on February 23, 2015 by Merregnon Studios. The album, along with the concerts themselves, were heavily praised, both for the quality of the performance and for the quality of the arrangements, which overlaid themes from multiple pieces rather than relying on a more traditional medley. The concert series was followed by Final Symphony II, a similar concert tour by Merregnon Studios which began in 2015 with music from Final Fantasy V, VII, IX, and XIII.

List of female action heroes and villains

The following is a list of female action heroes and villains who appear in action films, television shows, comic books, and video games and who are "thrust into a series of challenges requiring physical feats, extended fights, extensive stunts and frenetic chases." Elizabeth Abele suggests that "the key agency of female action protagonists is their ability to draw on the full range of masculine and feminine qualities in ever-evolving combinations."

Natalie Lander

Natalie Jenette Lander (born March 28, 1983) is an American actress, voice actress, and singer. She is the daughter of actors David Lander and Kathy Fields. She is known for her work on ABC's The Middle, where she plays Debbie. Other TV credits include Castle, Touch, and Hannah Montana. Natalie is also known for her work in video games, such as the voice of Kinzie Kensington in the Saints Row series. She placed fifth in the reality competition Legally Blonde: The Musical – The Search for Elle Woods, which aired on MTV.

Terra

Terra is the Latin name for Earth.

Terra may also refer to:

Terra (mythology), primeval Roman goddess

World of Final Fantasy

World of Final Fantasy (Japanese: ワールド オブ ファイナルファンタジー, Hepburn: Wārudo Obu Fainaru Fantajī) is a role-playing video game developed by Tose and Square Enix who also published it. It was released worldwide for PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita in October 2016, for Microsoft Windows in November 2017, and for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One in November 2018. Returning to a more traditional gameplay style from earlier Final Fantasy titles, it revolves around turn-based battles which utilize the series' recurring Active Time Battle system, augmented with a stacking mechanic where stacking allied characters and monsters affects stats and turn numbers. An enhanced edition, called World of Final Fantasy Maxima, was released on November 6, 2018, and has an avatar change mechanic to transform into a classic Final Fantasy character.World of Final Fantasy is primarily set in the world of Grymoire, a land populated by classic Final Fantasy characters and monsters from across the series, while being unconnected to any other series entry. The storyline focuses on twin siblings Lann and Reynn, who suffer from amnesia and hold the power in one of their arms to capture and wield Mirages, the monsters of Grymoire. Lann and Reynn travel to Grymoire to recover their memories, gradually mastering their powers and becoming involved in the conflicts consuming the world - these include fights between rival factions within the native Lilikins, and the impending threat of the Bahamutian Army.

Development started around the concept of a Final Fantasy title aimed at a wider and younger audience, focusing on a light tone and stylised graphics compared to the mainline entries. It was directed by Hiroki Chiba, who had worked as a scenario writer and event planner for the series and also wrote the scenario for World of Final Fantasy. The chibi character designs, which had been used for Pictlogica Final Fantasy, were created by Yasuhisa Izumisawa; the larger characters were designed by Tetsuya Nomura. The music was composed primarily by Masashi Hamauzu, who also included arranged versions of classic themes while aiming for the music to be lighter in tone.

First announced at the 2015 Electronic Entertainment Expo, World of Final Fantasy was intended as a celebratory title to commemorate the series' 30th anniversary. A worldwide release was planned from an early stage, with localization running parallel to the development and Japanese voice recording. In order to keep the characters true to their original appearances, the localization staff who first handled them were brought in to translate their dialogue.

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