Tenebrionoidea

The Tenebrionoidea are a very large and diverse superfamily of beetles.[1] It generally corresponds to the Heteromera of earlier authors.

It contains these families:

Tenebrionoidea
Reitter-1911-plate128
Central European Tenebrionoidea
with some anatomical details
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Suborder:
Infraorder:
Superfamily:
Tenebrionoidea

Latreille, 1802
Families

See text.

References

  1. ^ Beutel, RG; Friedrich, F (2005). "Comparative study of larvae of Tenebrionoidea (Coleoptera: Cucujiformia)" (PDF). European Journal of Entomology. 102: 241–264. Retrieved 22 June 2018.

External links

Archeocrypticidae

The family Archeocrypticidae is a small group of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name cryptic fungus beetles. Adults and larvae seems to be saprophagous and are often found in plant litter. Worldwide, about 10 genera and 50 species are found, most species are pantropical. Enneboeus caseyi has been recorded from the American South, Central America, and Mexico. About 20 species are found in Australia, in the genera Enneboeus and Australenneboeus.

Boridae

The Boridae are a small family of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name conifer bark beetles.

Chalcodryidae

The Chalcodryidae are a family of beetles in the large suborder Polyphaga.

Fire-coloured beetle

Fire-coloured beetles are the beetles of the Pyrochroidae family, which includes the red cardinal beetles. This family contains some 150 species. Many species in the subfamily Pyrochroinae have comb- or antler-like antennae. This family also now includes most former members of the defunct family Pedilidae.

Melandryidae

Melandryidae is a family of false darkling beetles in the order Coleoptera. There are at least 40 genera and 100 described species in Melandryidae.

Mycetophagidae

The Mycetophagidae or hairy fungus beetles are a family of beetles in the large suborder Polyphaga. The different species are between 1.0 and 6.5 mm in length. The larvae and adults live in decaying leaf litter, fungi, and under bark. Most species feed on fungi (hence the name). Worldwide, the 18 genera contain around 200 species.

Mycteridae

The family Mycteridae is a small group of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name palm and flower beetles.

The family Mycteridae is distributed worldwide. There are about 30 genera and 160 species. About 20 species are found in Australian, species of three genera are found in North America (Mycterus, Hemipeplus and Lacconotus)

Perimylopidae

Perimylopidae is a family of beetles, in the large suborder Polyphaga. It is now called Promecheilidae

Prostomidae

The family Prostomidae is a small group of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name jugular-horned beetles. They are often found in dead wood. The family consist of two genera with about 20 species. Prostomis mandibularis is known from North America. Other species of Prostomis are found in Africa, the Pacific region and East Asia. Species of Dryocora are known from New Zealand, Australia and Tasmania.

Pterogeniidae

Pterogeniidae is a family of beetles, in the large suborder Polyphaga.

Pythidae

The family Pythidae is a small group of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name dead log bark beetles. There are about 10 genera and 17 described species in Pythidae.

Ripiphoridae

The Ripiphoridae (formerly spelled Rhipiphoridae) are a cosmopolitan family of some 450 described species of beetles. Informally they are known by the common name "wedge-shaped beetles". The Ripiphoridae are unusual among beetle families in that many species are hypermetamorphic parasitoids, an attribute that they share with the Meloidae. Members of the family differ in their choice of hosts, but most attack various species of bees or wasps, while some others attack cockroaches.

Many species of Ripiphoridae have abbreviated elytra, and flabellate or pectinate antennae. Genera include Allocinops, Rhipistena and Sharpides.Species that attack bees typically lay their eggs on flowers. There the eggs hatch almost immediately into small planidial larvae and lie in wait for a visiting host. The planidium mounts the bee and rides it back to the hive. There it dismounts and seeks a cell occupied by a host larva. The planidium then enters the body of the host. It changes its skin and shape, then remains more or less dormant until the host larva pupates. It then emerges from the bee pupa and begins to feed. It eats the entire pupa, then pupates in its turn and completes its metamorphosis before emerging from the hive to mate and lay eggs.Fossil species in the genera Paleoripiphorus, Macrosiagon, Cretaceoripidius, Flabellotoma, Burmitoma, Plesiotoma, and Amberocula have been described from mid- to lower-Cretaceous amber from sites in France, Germany and Burma.

Salpingidae

Salpingidae or narrow-waisted bark beetles is a family of beetles, in the large suborder Polyphaga. The species are small, about 1.5 – 7 mm in length. This family is worldwide distributed and consists of about 45 genera and 300 species.

Scraptiidae

The family Scraptiidae is a small group of beetles sometimes called false flower beetles. There are about 400 species in 30 genera with a world-wide distribution. The adults are found on flowers, sometimes in large numbers. These beetles are very common and easily confused with members of the related family Mordellidae.

Stenotrachelidae

Stenotrachelidae, commonly called false longhorn beetles is a family of beetles, in the large suborder Polyphaga.

Synchroidae

The Synchroidae are a small family of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name synchroa bark beetles. The family consists of three extant genera, Mallodrya, Synchroa, and Synchroina, with a total of nine species.

Tetratomidae

The Tetratomidae are a small family of beetles with no vernacular common name, though recent authors have coined the name polypore fungus beetles. The family consists of several genera, most of which used to be in the family Melandryidae. The Tetratomidae can be found worldwide.Their food consists of fruiting bodies of hymenomycete fungi

Trachelostenidae

The Trachelostenidae are a family of beetles in the large suborder Polyphaga.

Ulodidae

The Ulodidae are a family of beetles in the large suborder Polyphaga.

Extant Coleoptera families

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