Television set

A television set or television receiver, more commonly called a television, TV, TV set, or telly, is a device that combines a tuner, display, and loudspeakers for the purpose of viewing television. Introduced in the late 1920s in mechanical form, television sets became a popular consumer product after World War II in electronic form, using cathode ray tubes. The addition of color to broadcast television after 1953 further increased the popularity of television sets in the 1960s, and an outdoor antenna became a common feature of suburban homes. The ubiquitous television set became the display device for the first recorded media in the 1970s, such as Betamax, VHS and later DVD. It was also the display device for the first generation of home computers (e.g., Timex Sinclair 1000) and video game consoles (e.g., Atari) in the 1980s. In the 2010s flat panel television incorporating liquid-crystal displays, especially LED-backlit LCDs, largely replaced cathode ray tubes and other displays.[1][2] [3] [4] [5] Modern flat panel TVs are typically capable of high-definition display (720p, 1080i, 1080p) and can also play content from a USB device.

TOSHIBA REGZA 55ZX9000
A Toshiba Regza LCD television set
TCL H9700 55” Quantum Dot TV with Color IQ (16862291531)
A TCL television set
Sony Wega TV set
A Sony Wega CRT television set

History

RCA 630-TS Television
RCA 630-TS, the first mass-produced electronic television set, which sold in 1946–1947

Mechanical televisions were commercially sold from 1928 to 1934 in the United Kingdom,[6] United States, and Soviet Union.[7] The earliest commercially made televisions were radios with the addition of a television device consisting of a neon tube behind a mechanically spinning disk with a spiral of apertures that produced a red postage-stamp size image, enlarged to twice that size by a magnifying glass. The Baird "Televisor" (sold in 1930–1933 in the UK) is considered the first mass-produced television, selling about a thousand units.[8]

In 1926, Kenjiro Takayanagi demonstrated the first TV system that employed a cathode ray tube (CRT) display, at Hamamatsu Industrial High School in Japan.[9] This was the first working example of a fully electronic television receiver.[10] His research toward creating a production model was halted by the US after Japan lost World War II.[9]

Consumer Reports - product testing - television testing laboratory
A television testing laboratory

The first commercially made electronic televisions with cathode ray tubes were manufactured by Telefunken in Germany in 1934,[11][12] followed by other makers in France (1936),[13] Britain (1936),[14] and America (1938).[15][16] The cheapest model with a 12-inch (30 cm) screen was $445 (equivalent to $7,921 in 2018).[17] An estimated 19,000 electronic televisions were manufactured in Britain, and about 1,600 in Germany, before World War II. About 7,000–8,000 electronic sets were made in the U.S.[18] before the War Production Board halted manufacture in April 1942, production resuming in August 1945. Television usage in the western world skyrocketed after World War II with the lifting of the manufacturing freeze, war-related technological advances, the drop in television prices caused by mass production, increased leisure time, and additional disposable income. While only 0.5% of U.S. households had a television in 1946, 55.7% had one in 1954, and 90% by 1962.[19] In Britain, there were 15,000 television households in 1947, 1.4 million in 1952, and 15.1 million by 1968. By the late 1960s and early 1970s, color television had come into wide use. In Britain, BBC1, BBC2 and ITV were regularly broadcasting in colour by 1969.[20]

During the first decade of the 21st century, CRT "picture tube" display technology was almost entirely supplanted worldwide by flat panel displays. By the early 2010s, LCD TVs, which increasingly used LED-backlit LCDs, accounted for the overwhelming majority of television sets being manufactured.[1][2] [3] [4] [5]

Display

Television sets may employ one of several available display technologies. As of the mid-2010s, LCDs overwhelmingly predominate in new merchandise, but OLED displays are claiming an increasing market share as they become more affordable and DLP technology continues to offer some advantages in projection systems. The production of plasma and CRT displays has been almost completely discontinued.[1][2][3][4][5][21]

There are four primary competing TV technologies:

  • CRT
  • LCD (multiple variations of LCD screens are called QLED, quantum dot, LED, LCD TN, LCD IPS, LCD PLS, LCD VA, etc.)
  • OLED
  • Plasma

CRT

Crt14
A 14-inch cathode ray tube showing its deflection coils and electron guns

The cathode ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube containing one or more electron guns (a source of electrons or electron emitter) and a fluorescent screen used to view images.[22] It has a means to accelerate and deflect the electron beam(s) onto the screen to create the images. The images may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets or others. The CRT uses an evacuated glass envelope which is large, deep (i.e. long from front screen face to rear end), fairly heavy, and relatively fragile. As a matter of safety, both the face (panel) and back (funnel) were typically made of thick lead glass so as to be block most electron emissions from the electron gun in the very back of the tube. By the early 1970s, most color TVs replaced leaded glass in the face panel with vitrified barium glass, which also blocked electron gun emissions but allowed better color visibility. This also eliminated the need for cadmium phosphors in earlier color televisions. Leaded glass, which is less expensive, continued to be used in the funnel glass, which is not visible to the consumer.

In television sets and computer monitors, the entire front area of the tube is scanned repetitively and systematically in a fixed pattern called a raster. An image is produced by controlling the intensity of each of the three electron beams, one for each additive primary color (red, green, and blue) with a video signal as a reference.[23] In all modern CRT monitors and televisions, the beams are bent by magnetic deflection, a varying magnetic field generated by coils and driven by electronic circuits around the neck of the tube, although electrostatic deflection is commonly used in oscilloscopes, a type of diagnostic instrument.[23]

DLP

Christie Mirage 5000
The Christie Mirage 5000, a 2001 DLP projector.

Digital Light Processing (DLP) is a type of projector technology that uses a digital micromirror device. Some DLPs have a TV tuner, which makes them a type of TV display. It was originally developed in 1987 by Larry Hornbeck of Texas Instruments. While the DLP imaging device was invented by Texas Instruments, the first DLP based projector was introduced by Digital Projection Ltd in 1997. Digital Projection and Texas Instruments were both awarded Emmy Awards in 1998 for the DLP projector technology. DLP is used in a variety of display applications from traditional static displays to interactive displays and also non-traditional embedded applications including medical, security, and industrial uses.

DLP technology is used in DLP front projectors (standalone projection units for classrooms and business primarily), DLP rear projection television sets, and digital signs. It is also used in about 85% of digital cinema projection, and in additive manufacturing as a power source in some printers to cure resins into solid 3D objects.[24]

Plasma

A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display common to large TV displays 30 inches (76 cm) or larger. They are called "plasma" displays because the technology utilizes small cells containing electrically charged ionized gases, or what are in essence chambers more commonly known as fluorescent lamps.

LCD

LCD generic tv
A generic LCD TV, with speakers on either side of the screen.

Liquid-crystal-display televisions (LCD TV) are television sets that use Liquid-crystal displays to produce images. LCD televisions are much thinner and lighter than cathode ray tube (CRTs) of similar display size, and are available in much larger sizes (e.g., 90 inch diagonal). When manufacturing costs fell, this combination of features made LCDs practical for television receivers.

In 2007, LCD televisions surpassed sales of CRT-based televisions globally for the first time,[25] and their sales figures relative to other technologies accelerated. LCD TVs quickly displaced the only major competitors in the large-screen market, the plasma display panel and rear-projection television. In the mid-2010s LCDs became, by far, the most widely produced and sold television display type.[1][2]

LCDs also have disadvantages. Other technologies address these weaknesses, including OLEDs, FED and SED.

OLED

LG전자, 깜빡임 없는 55인치 3D OLED TV 공개(2)
OLED TV

An OLED (organic light-emitting diode) is a light-emitting diode (LED) in which the emissive electroluminescent layer is a film of organic compound which emits light in response to an electric current. This layer of organic semiconductor is situated between two electrodes. Generally, at least one of these electrodes is transparent. OLEDs are used to create digital displays in devices such as television screens. It is also used for computer monitors, portable systems such as mobile phones, handheld games consoles and PDAs.

There are two main families of OLED: those based on small molecules and those employing polymers. Adding mobile ions to an OLED creates a light-emitting electrochemical cell or LEC, which has a slightly different mode of operation. OLED displays can use either passive-matrix (PMOLED) or active-matrix addressing schemes. Active-matrix OLEDs (AMOLED) require a thin-film transistor backplane to switch each individual pixel on or off, but allow for higher resolution and larger display sizes.

An OLED display works without a backlight. Thus, it can display deep black levels and can be thinner and lighter than a liquid crystal display (LCD). In low ambient light conditions such as a dark room, an OLED screen can achieve a higher contrast ratio than an LCD, whether the LCD uses cold cathode fluorescent lamps or LED backlight.

Outdoor television

An outdoor television set designed for outdoor use is usually found in the outdoor sections of bars, sports fields, or other community facilities. Most outdoor televisions use High-definition television technology. Their body is more robust. The screens are designed to remain clearly visible even in sunny outdoor lighting. The screens also have anti-reflective coatings to prevent glare. They are weather-resistant and often also have anti-theft brackets. Outdoor TV models can also be connected with BD players and PVRs for greater functionality.[26]

Replacing

In the United States, the average consumer replaces their television every 6.9 years, but research suggests that due to advanced software and apps, the replacement cycle may be shortening.[27]

Recycling and disposal

Due to recent changes in electronic waste legislation, economical and environmentally friendly television disposal has been made increasingly more available in the form of television recycling. The salvage value of the materials of the set, such as copper wiring in CRT sets, offset the costs of recycling, and sometimes even positive gains.[28] Challenges with recycling television sets include proper HAZMAT disposal, landfill pollution, and illegal international trade.[29]

World's largest TV manufacturers

Global 2016 years statistics for LCD TV.[30]

Rank Manufacturer Market share (%) Headquarters
1 South Korea Samsung 21.6 Seoul, South Korea
2 South Korea LG Electronics 11.9 Seoul, South Korea
3 China TCL 9 Huizhou, China
4 China Hisense 6.1 Qingdao, China
5 Japan Sony 5.6 Minato, Japan
6 China Skyworth 4.5 Shenzhen, China
7 Hong Kong TPV Technology (Philips) 3.8 Hong Kong, China
8 United States Vizio 3.7 Irvine, USA
9 China Haier 3.4 Qingdao, China
10 China Changhong 3.2 Mianyang, China
11 Others 27.2

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "IHS Technology – The Source for Critical Information and Insight. - IHS Technology". www.displaysearch.com.
  2. ^ a b c d "RIP, rear-projection TV".
  3. ^ a b c Jacobson, Julie. "Mitsubishi Drops DLP Displays: Goodbye RPTVs Forever". www.cepro.com.
  4. ^ a b c "LG's Exit May Herald End of Plasma TVs - Tom's Guide". 28 October 2014.
  5. ^ a b c http://www.datadisplay-group.com/fileadmin/pdf/produkte/EOL_PCN/EOL_notice_customer_CCFL_reflector120711.pdf
  6. ^ Early British Television: Baird, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  7. ^ Pre-1935, Television History: The First 75 Years. The French model shown does not appear to have entered production.
  8. ^ Pre-1935 Baird Sets: UK, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  9. ^ a b Kenjiro Takayanagi: The Father of Japanese Television, NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation), 2002, retrieved 2009-05-23.
  10. ^ "Milestones:Development of Electronic Television, 1924-1941". Retrieved 11 December 2015.
  11. ^ Telefunken, Early Electronic TV Gallery, Early Television Foundation.
  12. ^ 1934–35 Telefunken, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  13. ^ 1936 French Television, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  14. ^ 1936 Baird T5, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  15. ^ Communicating Systems, Inc., Early Electronic TV Gallery, Early Television Foundation.
  16. ^ America's First Electronic Television Set, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  17. ^ American TV Prices, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  18. ^ Annual Television Sales in USA, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  19. ^ Number of TV Households in America, Television History: The First 75 Years.
  20. ^ "Britain's oldest colour telly 'still going strong' 42 years on, says 69-year-old owner".
  21. ^ "spanish info about tv". TVbaratas. 2016.
  22. ^ "History of the Cathode Ray Tube". About.com. Retrieved 4 October 2009.
  23. ^ a b "'How Computer Monitors Work'". Retrieved 4 October 2009.
  24. ^ "How Digital Light Processing Works". THRE3D.com. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 3 February 2014.
  25. ^ Sherwood, James (22 February 2008). "Global LCD TV sales overtake CRT". The Register. Retrieved 3 July 2018.
  26. ^ "SunBrite outdoor TV: An expensive luxury".
  27. ^ Pierce, David (2018-11-25). "Your Smart TV Is Only Going to Get Dumber". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2018-11-27.
  28. ^ How To Scrap A Television, www.ScrapMetalJunkie.com
  29. ^ CRT disposal Archived 4 January 2012 at the Wayback Machine, www.Bordercenter.org
  30. ^ Global market share held by LCD TV manufacturers from 2008 to 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2015.

External links

Act Break

"Act Break" is the first segment of the eighth episode from the first season (1985–86) of the television series The Twilight Zone.

American Heroes Channel

American Heroes Channel (formerly Military Channel and originally Discovery Wings Channel) is an American pay television channel that is owned by Discovery, Inc. The network carries programs related to the military, warfare, and military history and science.

As of February 2015, the channel is available to approximately 59,917,000 pay television households (51.5% of households with at least one television set) in the United States.

DigiCipher 2

DigiCipher 2, or simply DCII, is a proprietary standard format of digital signal transmission and it doubles as an encryption standard with MPEG-2/MPEG-4 signal video compression used on many communications satellite television and audio signals. The DCII standard was originally developed in 1997 by General Instrument, which then became the Home and Network Mobility division of Motorola, then bought by Google in Aug 2011, and lastly became the Home portion of the division to Arris.The original attempt for a North American digital signal encryption and compression standard was DigiCipher 1, which was used most notably in the now-defunct PrimeStar medium-power direct broadcast satellite (DBS) system during the early 1990s. The DCII standard predates wide acceptance of DVB-based digital terrestrial television compression (although not cable or satellite DVB) and therefore is incompatible with the DVB standard.

Approximately 70% of newer first-generation digital cable networks in North America use the 4DTV/DigiCipher 2 format. The use of DCII is most prevalent in North American digital cable television set-top boxes. DCII is also used on Motorola's 4DTV digital satellite television tuner and Shaw Direct's DBS receiver.

The DigiCipher 2 encryption standard was reverse engineered in 2016.

Elizabeth I (2005 miniseries)

Elizabeth I is a two-part 2005 British historical drama television miniseries directed by Tom Hooper, written by Nigel Williams, and starring Helen Mirren as Elizabeth I of England. The miniseries covers approximately the last 24 years of her nearly 45-year reign. Part 1 focuses on the final years of her relationship with the Earl of Leicester, played by Jeremy Irons. Part 2 focuses on her subsequent relationship with the Earl of Essex, played by Hugh Dancy.

The series originally was broadcast in the United Kingdom in two two-hour segments on Channel 4. It later aired on HBO in the United States, CBC and TMN in Canada, ATV in Hong Kong, ABC in Australia, and TVNZ Television One in New Zealand.

The series went on to win Emmy, Peabody, and Golden Globe Awards.

Elizabeth R

Elizabeth R is a BBC television drama serial of six 85-minute plays starring Glenda Jackson as Elizabeth I of England. It was first broadcast on BBC2 from February to March 1971, through the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Australia and broadcast in America on PBS's Masterpiece Theatre.

Flat-panel display

Flat-panel displays are electronic viewing technologies used to enable people to see content (still images, moving images, text, or other visual material) in a range of entertainment, consumer electronics, personal computer, and mobile devices, and many types of medical, transportation and industrial equipment. They are far lighter and thinner than traditional cathode ray tube (CRT) television sets and video displays and are usually less than 10 centimetres (3.9 in) thick. Flat-panel displays can be divided into two display device categories: volatile and static. Volatile displays require that pixels be periodically electronically refreshed to retain their state (e.g., liquid-crystal displays (LCD)). A volatile display only shows an image when it has battery or AC mains power. Static flat-panel displays rely on materials whose color states are bistable (e.g., e-book reader tablets from Sony), and as such, flat-panel displays retain the text or images on the screen even when the power is off. As of 2016, flat-panel displays have almost completely replaced old CRT displays. In many 2010-era applications, specifically small portable devices such as laptops, mobile phones, smartphones, digital cameras, camcorders, point-and-shoot cameras, and pocket video cameras, any display disadvantages of flat-panels (as compared with CRTs) are made up for by portability advantages (thinness and lightweightness).

Most 2010s-era flat-panel displays use LCD and/or LED technologies. Most LCD screens are back-lit as color filters are used to display colors. Flat-panel displays are thin and lightweight and provide better linearity and they are capable of higher resolution than typical consumer-grade TVs from earlier eras. The highest resolution for consumer-grade CRT TVs was 1080i; in contrast, many flat-panels can display 1080p or even 4K resolution. As of 2016, some devices that use flat-panels, such as tablet computers, smartphones and, less commonly, laptops, use touchscreens, a feature that enables users to select onscreen icons or trigger actions (e.g., playing a digital video) by touching the screen. Many touchscreen-enabled devices can display a virtual QWERTY or numeric keyboard on the screen, to enable the user to type words or numbers.

A multifunctional monitor (MFM) is a flat-panel display that has additional video inputs (more than a typical LCD monitor) and is designed to be used with a variety of external video sources, such as VGA input, HDMI input from a VHS VCR or video game console and, in some cases, a USB input or card reader for viewing digital photos). In many instances, an MFM also includes a TV tuner, making it similar to a LCD TV that offers computer connectivity.

Genesis Nomad

The Genesis Nomad (also known as Sega Nomad) is a handheld game console by Sega released in North America in October 1995. The Nomad is a portable variation of Sega's home console, the Sega Genesis (known as the Mega Drive outside North America). Based on the Mega Jet, a portable version of the home console designed for use on airline flights in Japan, Nomad served to succeed the Game Gear and was the last handheld console released by Sega. In addition to functioning as a portable device, it was designed to be used with a television set via a video port. Released late in the Genesis era, the Nomad had a short lifespan.

Sold exclusively in North America, the Nomad was never officially released worldwide, and employs a regional lockout. Sega's focus on the Sega Saturn left the Nomad undersupported, and the handheld itself was incompatible with several Genesis peripherals, including the Power Base Converter, the Sega CD, and the 32X.

List of programs broadcast by Sony Entertainment Television (India)

This is the list of original programming currently, upcoming and formerly broadcast by the Indian television channel Sony Entertainment Television (SET) in India.

Reign (TV series)

Reign is an American historical romantic drama television series following the early exploits of Mary, Queen of Scots. The series, created by Stephanie SenGupta and Laurie McCarthy, premiered on October 17, 2013, on The CW, and concluded after four seasons on June 16, 2017.

Sanlih E-Television

Sanlih Entertainment Television or Sanlih E-Television (SET; Chinese: 三立電視; pinyin: Sānlì Diànshì; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Saⁿ-li̍p Tiān-sī) is a nationwide cable TV network operated in Taiwan which was founded in May 1993. It also produces Taiwanese drama that are broadcast on free-to-air channels e.g. Taiwan Television (TTV).

In terms of political orientation, Sanlih leans heavily towards the Pan-Green Coalition.

Science Channel

Science Channel (often referred to as simply Science) is an American pay television channel that is owned by Discovery, Inc. The channel features programming focusing on the fields of wilderness survival, ufology, manufacturing, construction, technology, space, prehistory and animal science.

As of February 2015, Science is available to approximately 75.5 million pay television households (64.8% of households with at least one television set) in the United States.

Set-top box

A set-top box (STB) or set-top unit (STU) (one type also colloquially known as a cable box) is an information appliance device that generally contains a TV-tuner input and displays output to a television set and an external source of signal, turning the source signal into content in a form that then be displayed on the television screen or other display device. They are used in cable television, satellite television, and over-the-air television systems, as well as other uses.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the cost to a cable provider for a set-top box is between $150 for a basic box to $250 for a more sophisticated box in the United States. In 2016, the average pay-TV subscriber paid $231 per year to lease their set-top box from a cable service provider.

Sharp Nintendo Television

The Sharp Nintendo Television (often described as the C1 NES TV; originally released for Japanese markets as My Computer TV C1 (マイコンピュータテレビC1, Mai Konpyuta Terebi C1)) is a television produced by Sharp Corporation with a built-in licensed Nintendo Entertainment System. Originally released in Japan in 1983, the unit was released in the US in 1989. The C1 is notable for having provided the high-quality screenshots displayed in video game magazines of the period, due to its having slightly better picture quality than a Famicom or NES paired with a separate television. The concept was followed up in Japan by the Super Famicom-based SF1 in 1990.

Smart TV

A smart TV is a traditional television set with integrated Internet and interactive "Web 2.0" features which allows users to stream music and videos, browse the internet, and view photos. Smart TV is a technological convergence of computers, television sets and set-top boxes. Besides the traditional functions of television sets and set-top boxes provided through traditional broadcasting media, these devices can also provide Internet TV, online interactive media, over-the-top content (OTT), as well as on-demand streaming media, and home networking access.Smart TV should not be confused with Internet TV, IPTV or Web television. Internet TV refers to receiving television content over the Internet instead of traditional systems (terrestrial, cable and satellite) (although Internet itself is received by these methods). IPTV is one of the Internet television technology standards for use by television broadcasters. Web television is a term used for programs created by a wide variety of companies and individuals for broadcast on Internet TV.

In smart TVs, the operating system is preloaded or is available through the set-top box. The software applications or "apps" can be preloaded into the device, or updated or installed on demand via an app store or marketplace, in a similar manner to how the apps are integrated in modern smartphones.The technology that enables smart TVs is also incorporated in external devices such as set-top boxes and some Blu-ray players, game consoles, digital media players, hotel television systems, smartphones, and other network-connected interactive devices that utilize television-type display outputs. These devices allow viewers to find and play videos, movies, TV shows, photos and other content from the Web, cable or satellite TV channel, or from a local storage device.

Sportsman Channel

Sportsman Channel is an American sports-oriented digital cable and satellite television network that is owned by the Outdoor Sportsman Group subsidiary of Kroenke Sports & Entertainment. The channel is dedicated to programming about outdoor sports, including hunting, shooting and fishing.

As of February 2015, Sportsman Channel is available to approximately 34.1 million pay television households (29.3% of households with at least one television set) in the United States.

TV One (U.S. TV network)

TV One is an American digital cable and satellite television network that is owned by Urban One (formerly Radio One until May 8, 2017), having acquired Comcast's stake in the TV network in 2015. Headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland, TV One's programming targets African American adults with a broad mix of original lifestyle and entertainment-oriented series, documentaries, movies, concert performances and reruns of sitcoms from the 1970s through the 2000s.

As of February 2015, TV One is available to approximately 57 million pay television households (48.9% of households with at least one television set) in the United States.

Telecommunications in Jersey

The telecommunications in Jersey relate to communication systems in Bailiwick of Jersey, which is a British Crown Dependency off the coast of Normandy, France.

Television

Television (TV), sometimes shortened to tele or telly, is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in color, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news.

Television became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions. During the 1950s, television was the primary medium for influencing public opinion. In the mid-1960s, color broadcasting was introduced in the US and most other developed countries. The availability of multiple types of archival storage media such as Betamax, VHS tape, local disks, DVDs, flash drives, high-definition Blu-ray Discs, and cloud digital video recorders has enabled viewers to watch pre-recorded material—such as movies—at home on their own time schedule. For many reasons, especially the convenience of remote retrieval, the storage of television and video programming now occurs on the cloud. At the end of the first decade of the 2000s, digital television transmissions greatly increased in popularity. Another development was the move from standard-definition television (SDTV) (576i, with 576 interlaced lines of resolution and 480i) to high-definition television (HDTV), which provides a resolution that is substantially higher. HDTV may be transmitted in various formats: 1080p, 1080i and 720p. Since 2010, with the invention of smart television, Internet television has increased the availability of television programs and movies via the Internet through streaming video services such as Netflix, Amazon Video, iPlayer and Hulu.

In 2013, 79% of the world's households owned a television set. The replacement of early bulky, high-voltage cathode ray tube (CRT) screen displays with compact, energy-efficient, flat-panel alternative technologies such as LCDs (both fluorescent-backlit and LED), OLED displays, and plasma displays was a hardware revolution that began with computer monitors in the late 1990s. Most TV sets sold in the 2000s were flat-panel, mainly LEDs. Major manufacturers announced the discontinuation of CRT, DLP, plasma, and even fluorescent-backlit LCDs by the mid-2010s. In the near future, LEDs are expected to be gradually replaced by OLEDs. Also, major manufacturers have announced that they will increasingly produce smart TVs in the mid-2010s. Smart TVs with integrated Internet and Web 2.0 functions became the dominant form of television by the late 2010s.Television signals were initially distributed only as terrestrial television using high-powered radio-frequency transmitters to broadcast the signal to individual television receivers. Alternatively television signals are distributed by coaxial cable or optical fiber, satellite systems and, since the 2000s via the Internet. Until the early 2000s, these were transmitted as analog signals, but a transition to digital television is expected to be completed worldwide by the late 2010s. A standard television set is composed of multiple internal electronic circuits, including a tuner for receiving and decoding broadcast signals. A visual display device which lacks a tuner is correctly called a video monitor rather than a television.

Why Don't You?

Why Don't You? or Why Don't You Just Switch Off Your Television Set and Go Out and Do Something Less Boring Instead? was a BBC children's television series broadcast in 42 series between 20 August 1973 and 21 April 1995. It was originally broadcast in the morning during the Summer school holidays and once was shown during the weekday evening children's TV slot around 4:45 to 5:45. Later it went out during the Easter and Christmas school holidays although it was also broadcast once on Saturday mornings. The format consisted of groups or "gangs" of children responding to letters from viewers who wrote into the show suggesting games, 'makes' and days out. Typically these were arts-and-crafts activities or games and magic tricks children could learn to impress their friends.

Created by producer/director Patrick Dowling at the BBC's Bristol studios, Russell T Davies was later at one time a producer and director for Why Don't You...? before going on to greater fame as writer of Queer as Folk and producer of the 2005 revival of Doctor Who. Under Davies's direction, the format of the series shifted from magazine show to drama, with plots frequently centring on harebrained young Welsh presenter Ben Slade and his increasingly elaborate inventions. Slade was the longest serving presenters in the show's 22-year run.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.