Ted Simmons

Ted Lyle Simmons (born August 9, 1949) is an American former professional baseball player and coach.[1] A switch-hitter, Simmons was a catcher for most of his Major League Baseball career with the St. Louis Cardinals (1968–80), the Milwaukee Brewers (1981–85) and the Atlanta Braves (1986–88).[1] Although he was often overshadowed by his contemporary, Johnny Bench, Simmons is considered one of the best hitting catchers in Major League baseball history.[2] While he didn't possess Bench's power hitting ability, he hit for a higher batting average.[3] A volatile competitor with an intense desire to win, Simmons once fought with teammate John Denny during a game at Busch Memorial Stadium, in the runway between the club house and the dugout.[4]

At the time of his retirement, Simmons led all catchers in career hits and doubles and ranked second in RBIs behind Yogi Berra and second in total bases behind Carlton Fisk. He also retired with the National League record for home runs by a switch-hitter despite playing several years in the American League. Simmons hit .300 seven different times, hit 20 home runs six times, and caught 122 shutouts, eighth-most all-time. In 2017, he missed being elected to the Hall of Fame by one vote.[5][6]

Ted Simmons
Ted Simmons - St. Louis Cardinals
Catcher
Born: August 9, 1949 (age 69)
Highland Park, Michigan
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 21, 1968, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1988, for the Atlanta Braves
MLB statistics
Batting average.285
Hits2,472
Home runs248
Runs batted in1,389
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Simmons attended Southfield High School in Southfield, Michigan, a suburb northwest of Detroit, and graduated in 1967. He was selected by the St. Louis Cardinals as their first round pick in that year's amateur draft.[7] He made his major league debut with the Cardinals, appearing in two games during the 1968 pennant-winning season, while playing most of the year in the minor leagues.[1] Simmons spent another year in Triple-A at Tulsa before returning to the major leagues in 1970 where he platooned with Joe Torre.[8] In 1971, the Cardinals converted Torre into a third baseman and Simmons took over as their starting catcher, posting a .304 batting average with 7 home runs and 77 runs batted in.[1][9] He finished 16th in balloting for the 1971 National League Most Valuable Player Award as the Cardinals finished in second place behind the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League Eastern Division.[10][11]

Simmons refused to sign a contract for the amount of salary offered by the Cardinals in 1972, electing to play without a contract.[12] He ultimately signed a contract well into the season during which he was recognized as one of the top catchers in the league by earning a spot as a reserve on the 1972 National League All-Star team.[13] He finished the year with a .303 batting average with 16 home runs and 96 runs batted in, breaking Walker Cooper's team record for RBIs by a catcher and, set the team record for home runs by a catcher, previously held jointly by Gene Oliver and Tim McCarver.[1][12] His defense began to improve as well, posting a .991 fielding percentage and leading National League catchers in assists and in putouts.[14] Despite the Cardinals finishing the season in fourth place, Simmons would finish in 10th place in the National League Most Valuable Player Award balloting.[15][16] Simmons continued to produce offensively in 1973 with a .310 batting average, along with 13 home runs and 91 runs batted in.[1] He also led the league's catchers in putouts and finished second in assists, earning his second All-Star berth as the Cardinals again finished the season in second place.[17][18]

In 1975, Simmons hit 18 home runs along with 100 runs batted and posted a career-high .332 batting average, finishing second in the National League batting championship behind Bill Madlock.[1][19] He also set a National League single-season record for most hits by a catcher with 188.[1][3] He finished in 6th place in the National League Most Valuable Player Award balloting as the Cardinals ended the season in fourth place.[20][21] Simmons broke Johnny Bench's nine-year stranglehold as the starting catcher for the National League All-Star team when he was elected to be the starting catcher for the National League in the 1978 All-Star Game.[22] Simmons led the Cardinals in RBIs every year from 1972 until 1978.[23] He had another strong year in 1980, hitting .303 with 21 home runs and 98 runs batted in to win the inaugural Silver Slugger Award which is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position.[1][24]

By the late-1970s, Simmons was throwing out less than one-third of potential basestealers.[25] During the 1980 season, Cardinals manager Whitey Herzog wanted Simmons moved to first base and Keith Hernandez to left field for the first six innings, with the latter often reverting to his original position at the end of games.[26] Simmons' refusal and the ensuing feud with Herzog led to him being traded along with Rollie Fingers and Pete Vuckovich to the Milwaukee Brewers for Sixto Lezcano, Lary Sorensen, Dave LaPoint and David Green at the 1980 Winter Meetings on December 12.[25][27] His batting averaged fell to .216 in his first season in the American League but, he rebounded in 1982 with a .269 batting average with 23 home runs and 97 runs batted and led American League catchers with a .995 fielding percentage in 121 games.[1][28] The Brewers clinched the American League Eastern Division title, then defeated the California Angels in the 1982 American League Championship Series.[29] Simmons met his old team, the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1982 World Series, hitting two home runs before the Brewers lost in a seven-game series.[30] Simmons had one more good year in 1983 when he hit for a .308 batting average with 13 home runs and 108 runs batted in and earned his eighth and final All-Star berth.[1][31] His batting average fell to .221 in 1984, though Simmons rebounded in 1985 with a .273 average and 76 RBI's, and in March 1986 he was traded to the Atlanta Braves.[1][32] He spent three seasons with the Braves as a utility player and pinch hitter before retiring as a player in 1988.[1]

Career statistics

In a twenty-one-year major league career, Simmons played in 2,456 games, accumulating 2,472 hits in 8,680 at bats for a .285 career batting average along with 248 home runs, 1,389 runs batted in and a .348 on-base percentage.[1] He ended his career with a .986 fielding percentage.[1] An eight-time All-Star, he batted above .300 seven times, reached 20 home runs six times, and eight times exceeded 90 runs batted in. He switch-hit home runs in a game three times and established a since-broken National League career record for home runs by a switch-hitter (182).[33][34] Simmons held major league records for catchers with 2,472 career hits and 483 doubles, since broken by Iván Rodríguez. He ranks second all-time among catchers with 1,389 runs batted in and 10th with 248 home runs.[33] He caught 122 shutouts in his career, ranking him eighth all-time among major league catchers.[35] In his book, The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, baseball historian Bill James ranked Simmons 10th all-time among major league catchers.[36]

Highlights

  • 8-time All-Star (1972–74, 1977–79, 1981, 1983)
  • Silver Slugger Award (1980)
  • 7-times hit .300 or more (1971–73, 1975, 1977, 1980, 1983)
  • Caught two no-hitters as a Cardinal: Bob Gibson in 1971,[37] the first of Bob Forsch's two career no-hitters, in 1978.[38]
  • Twice led the National League in intentional walks (1976–77). He ranks 15th in the All-Time list with 188.
  • He was featured several times in the commemorative DVD for the 1982 Milwaukee Brewers – Harvey's Wallbangers.

Baseball executive and coaching career

In 1992, Simmons was hired as general manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates. He served in that position for only a year, retiring after suffering a heart attack in June 1993. In Spring training 1992 Simmons had agreed to trade left fielder Barry Bonds to the Atlanta Braves, but backed out when Pirates manager Jim Leyland threatened to quit. He also was Director of Player Development for both the Cardinals and San Diego Padres, and a scout at the Major League level for the Cleveland Indians. He was named the bench coach for the Milwaukee Brewers starting with the 2010 season. On September 15, 2008, he was reassigned to another position within the organization.[39]

In November 2008 Simmons was named bench coach for the Padres under manager Bud Black, replacing Craig Colbert.[40] He was hired on November 5, 2010 as a senior advisor to general manager Jack Zduriencik of the Seattle Mariners.[41] Simmons rejoined the Braves in October 2015, as a scout.[42]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Ted Simmons". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  2. ^ How Ted Simmons Rates With Hall of Fame Catchers. Baseball Digest. Retrieved 31 August 2010.
  3. ^ a b Murray, Jim (October 1977). "Ted Simmons: The National League's Other Catcher". Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  4. ^ Koster, Rich (March 1983). "Ted Simmons Talks About The Challenges of Hitting". Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  5. ^ "Simmons misses on Hall election by one vote". Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  6. ^ "Forgotten star Ted Simmons is Hall-of-Fame worthy". Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  7. ^ "1967 Major League Baseball draft". thebaseballcube.com. Archived from the original on 29 August 2010. Retrieved 31 August 2010.
  8. ^ "1970 St. Louis Cardinals". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  9. ^ "1971 St. Louis Cardinals". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  10. ^ "1971 National League Most Valuable Player Award balloting results". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  11. ^ "1971 National League Final Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  12. ^ a b Broeg, Bob (June 1973). "Ted Simmons: Losing Drives Me Crazy!". Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  13. ^ "1972 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  14. ^ "1972 National League Fielding Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  15. ^ "1972 National League Most Valuable Player Award balloting results". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  16. ^ "1972 National League Final Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  17. ^ "1973 National League Fielding Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  18. ^ "1973 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  19. ^ "1975 National League Batting Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 16 October 2010.
  20. ^ "1975 National League Most Valuable Player Award balloting results". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  21. ^ "1975 National League Final Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  22. ^ "1978 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  23. ^ Jim Tommey and Kip Ingle, ed. (1987). St. Louis Cardinals 1987 Media Guide. St. Louis National Baseball Club. p. 153.
  24. ^ "1980 Silver Slugger Award Winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  25. ^ a b Posnanski, Joe. "Oft-overlooked Simmons has case for Hall," MLB.com, Saturday, November 25, 2017. Retrieved August 20, 2018
  26. ^ Hummel, Rick. "Long road leads Simmons to Cards Hall of Fame," St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Monday, August 17, 2015. Retrieved August 20, 2018
  27. ^ McCalvy, Adam. "1980 Meetings crucial to Crew's '82 success," MLB.com, Friday, December 8, 2017. Retrieved August 20, 2018
  28. ^ "1982 American League Fielding Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  29. ^ "1982 American League Championship Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  30. ^ "1982 World Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  31. ^ "1983 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  32. ^ "Ted Simmons Trades and Transactions". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  33. ^ a b "Ted Simmons". The Encyclopedia of Baseball Catchers. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  34. ^ "Home Run from Each Side of the Plate in a Game". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  35. ^ "The Encyclopedia of Catchers – Trivia December 2010 – Career Shutouts Caught". The Encyclopedia of Baseball Catchers. Retrieved 29 December 2015.
  36. ^ James, Bill (2001). The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. New York: Free Press. p. 375. ISBN 0-684-80697-5.
  37. ^ "August 14, 1971 Cardinals-Pirates box score". Retrosheet.org. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  38. ^ "August 16, 1978 Phillies-Cardinals box score". Retrosheet.org. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  39. ^ "Yost relieved of managerial post". MLB.com. Archived from the original on 2011-06-15. Retrieved 1 September 2010.
  40. ^ Brock, Corey (November 3, 2008). "Padres name hitting, bench coaches". MLB.com. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  41. ^ "Mariners hire Ted Simmons as senior advisor". The Seattle Times. Seattle Times Staff. 5 November 2010. Archived from the original on 11 January 2011. Retrieved 31 January 2011.
  42. ^ Bowman, Mark (October 12, 2015). "Former catcher Simmons among Braves' hires". MLB.com. Retrieved October 13, 2015.

External links

1967 Major League Baseball draft

The Major League Baseball draft (or "first-year player draft") recruits amateur baseball players into the American Major League Baseball league. The players selected in 1967 included many talented prospects who later had careers in the professional league. Some selections included Bobby Grich and Don Baylor (Baltimore), Vida Blue (Kansas City Athletics), Dusty Baker and Ralph Garr (Atlanta), Ken Singleton and Jon Matlack (Mets), and Ted Simmons and Jerry Reuss (St. Louis). In the January draft, Boston selected catcher Carlton Fisk and the New York Mets drafted Ken Singleton. The Cincinnati Reds selected Chris Chambliss in the 31st round only to have him enroll in junior college. The Mets chose Dan Pastorini in the 32nd round, but Pastorini chose football and played several seasons in the NFL. Atlanta also chose Archie Manning in the 43rd round.

1972 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1972 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 91st season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 81st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 75–81 during the season and finished fourth in the National League East, 21½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1977 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1977 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 96th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 86th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 83–79 during the season and finished third in the National League East, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

Vern Rapp took over as the Cardinals' manager this year, after the twelve-year reign of their longtime manager Red Schoendienst. On August 29, Cardinals left-fielder Lou Brock broke the modern-day stolen base record, by stealing bases 892 and 893 in a game against the Padres in San Diego.

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

1980 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1980 season was the team's 99th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 89th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 74-88 during the season and finished fourth in the National League East, 17 games behind the eventual NL pennant and World Series champion Philadelphia Phillies.

The Cardinals played the season under four different managers, Ken Boyer (fired June 8 between games of a double-header against the Expos in Montreal), Jack Krol (the second game of the double-header that same day), Whitey Herzog (June 9 until he was hired as the team's general manager in late August, succeeding John Claiborne, who was fired earlier in August) and Red Schoendienst (from late August to end of season). After the season, Herzog reclaimed the managerial job.

This team set a record for the most Silver Slugger Award winners in one season: Keith Hernández (first base), Garry Templeton (shortstop), George Hendrick (outfielder), Ted Simmons (catcher), and Bob Forsch (pitcher). Hernández also won a Gold Glove.

1981 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1981 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 52nd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on August 9, 1981, at Cleveland Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio, the home of the Cleveland Indians of the American League.

This was one of only two All-Star Games to be played outside the month of July (the other being the second 1959 game). The game was originally to be played on July 14, but was cancelled due to the players' strike lasting from June 12 to July 31. It was then brought back as a prelude to the second half of the season, which began the following day. At 72,086 people in attendance, it broke the stadium's own record of 69,751 set in 1954, setting the still-standing record for the highest attendance in an All Star Game.

Cleveland Stadium set a new All-Star Game record by hosting its fourth (and ultimately, final) Midsummer Classic. By the time Indians played host to the All-Star Game for the fifth time in 1997, they had moved to Jacobs Field.

1981 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers' 1981 season involved the Brewers' finishing 1st in American League East during the second half of the split schedule with an overall record of 62 wins and 47 losses. They proceeded to lose to the New York Yankees in the ALDS. Rollie Fingers became the first relief pitcher in the history of the American League to win the MVP Award.

1982 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1982 Milwaukee Brewers season resulted in the team winning its first and only American League Championship.

As a team, the Brewers led Major League Baseball in a number of offensive categories, including at bats (5733), runs scored (891), home runs (216), runs batted in (843), slugging percentage (.455), on-base plus slugging (.789), total bases (2606) and extra-base hits (534).

1982 World Series

The 1982 World Series featured the St. Louis Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers, with the Cardinals winning in seven games.

The Cardinals had last been in the World Series in 1968, and a Milwaukee team, the Braves, in 1958. The Milwaukee team of 1982 started as an expansion team in Seattle in 1969, which then moved to Milwaukee in 1970 and changed their name to the Brewers.The Cardinals made it to the Series by winning the National League East division by three games over the Philadelphia Phillies, and then defeating the Atlanta Braves by 3 games to none in the National League Championship Series. The Brewers made it by winning the American League East division by one game over the Baltimore Orioles, and then defeating the California Angels by 3 games to 2 in the American League Championship Series.

With the Cardinals winning this series, the National League achieved four straight World Series championships from 1979 to 1982. The National League would not again achieve even back-to-back victories until the Giants won in 2010 and the Cardinals in 2011.

Though the teams had never met before, their home cities had an existing commercial rivalry in the beer market, as St. Louis is the home of Anheuser–Busch, which owned the Cardinals at the time, while Milwaukee is the home of Miller Brewing and other past major competitors of Anheuser–Busch. This led the media to refer to it as the "Suds Series."

1984 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1984 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing 7th in the American League East with a record of 67 wins and 94 losses.

1986 Atlanta Braves season

The 1986 Atlanta Braves season was the 116th in franchise history and their 21st in Atlanta.

1994 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1994 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Steve Carlton.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected two, Leo Durocher and Phil Rizzuto.

1996 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1996 followed the system in use since 1995. The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players but no one tallied the necessary 75% support.

The BBWAA had petitioned the Hall of Fame Board of Directors on January 5, 1995, to reconsider the eligibility of Larry Bowa, Bill Madlock, Al Oliver and Ted Simmons, each of whom had failed to receive at least 5% of ballots cast in each of their first years of eligibility (Bowa and Oliver in 1991, Maddlock in 1993 and Simmons in 1994). The Board approved, but before the ballot was released, the BBWAA decided not to include them on the ballot after all.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions and selected four people from multiple classified ballots: Jim Bunning, Bill Foster, Ned Hanlon, and Earl Weaver.

Larry Doughty

Larry Doughty was the General Manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates Major League Baseball team, from 1989 to 1991.Doughty then became a scout for the Cincinnati Reds, becoming scouting supervisor and later Scouting Director for the Reds from 1983 to 1987. He joined the Pittsburgh Pirates as assistant general manager to Syd Thrift, along with Cincinnati associate Cam Bonifay as his head scout. Doughty replaced Thrift as General Manager of the Pirates on November 7, 1988 due to conflict between Thrift and the ownership group. The Pirates won division titles in Doughty's third and fourth years, with new additions Don Slaught, Zane Smith and Jay Bell.

He was criticized, though, for the loss of top prospects like Wes Chamberlain (on a waiver error) and Moisés Alou (for Smith), hurting the farm system. In 1992, the club's new president, Mark Sauer, replaced Doughty with Ted Simmons.

Doughty was a special assistant to the GM for the San Diego Padres in 1993.

He was the farm director for the Kansas City Royals in 1996 and a VP for player personnel in 1998.

In 1999-2000, Doughty was a special assistant to the GM of the New York Mets.

List of 24 characters

The following is a list of characters in the television series 24 by season and event. It includes some relatively minor characters not considered part of the main cast, and "bad guys". It is not, however, a complete list.

The list first names the actor, followed by the character.

Some characters have their own pages; see the box below.

List of St. Louis Cardinals team records

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). in 1892. Before joining the NL, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships, tying one other, and 23 league pennants. 11 of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; the other championship and tie occurred in 1885–1886. 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

Notable players have defined, in part, the Cardinals' success and history. Stan Musial owns the most career batting records with 22. Rogers Hornsby owns the most single-season records with 11. Bob Gibson owns the most career pitching records with 18. Silver King owns the most single-season pitching records with nine.

Maryanne

Maryanne may refer to:

Maryanne Amacher (1938–2009), American composer and installation artist

Maryanne Connelly (born 1945), Democratic politician in New Jersey and the former mayor of Fanwood

Maryanne Demasi, Australian science reporter and presenter with ABC's Catalyst

Maryanne Ellison Simmons (born 1949), artist, writer, and the wife of baseball player Ted Simmons

MaryAnne Golon, independent photography editor and professional media consultant

Maryanne Keller, Colorado State Senator

Maryanne Kusaka, American politician and former Mayor of the County of Kaua'i

Maryanne Lewis, American businesswoman and former Massachusetts State Representative

Maryanne Petrilla, currently the Luzerne County Commissioner Chairperson

MaryAnne Sapio, Washington DC lobbyist, and former beauty queen

MaryAnne Tebedo (born 1936), Colorado State Senator from Colorado Springs

Maryanne Tipler, New Zealand mathematics textbook author

Maryanne Trump Barry (born 1937), judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and older sister of President Donald Trump

Maryanne Vollers, author, journalist and well known ghostwriter

Maryanne Wolf, educator and author who studies the origins of reading and language-learning

Maryanne Zehil, filmmaker and a producer from Beirut

St. Louis Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals are an American professional baseball team based in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. Busch Stadium has been their home ballpark since 2006. One of the most successful franchises in baseball history, the Cardinals have won 11 World Series championships, the second-most in Major League Baseball (behind the New York Yankees) and the most in the National League. Their 19 National League pennants rank third in NL history. In addition, St. Louis has won 14 division titles in the East and Central divisions.

While still in the old American Association (AA), named then as the St. Louis Browns, the team won four AA league championships, qualifying them to play in the professional baseball championship tournament (a forerunner of the modern World Series) of that era. The then-Browns tied in 1885 and won outright in 1886 and lost in 1888 for the early trophy Hall Cup versus the New York Giants. The others both times against the Chicago Cubs (originally the Chicago White Stockings then), in the first meetings of the Cardinals–Cubs rivalry between nearby cities of St. Louis and Chicago that continues to this day.

With origins as one of the early professional baseball clubs in St. Louis and the nation, entrepreneur Chris von der Ahe purchased a barnstorming club in 1881, then known as the Brown Stockings, and established them as charter members of the old American Association (AA) base ball league which played 1882 to 1891, the following season. Upon the discontinuation of the AA, St. Louis joined the continuing National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, later known simply as the National League, (organized in 1876), in 1892; at that time, they were called the Browns (not to be confused with a later team also known as the St. Louis Browns in the American League, 1902-1953) and also as the Perfectos before they were officially renamed eight years later as the Cardinals in 1900.

Cardinals achievements that have impacted MLB and sports events in general include manager/owner Branch Rickey's pioneering of the farm system, Rogers Hornsby's two batting Triple Crowns, Dizzy Dean's 30-win season in 1934, Stan Musial's 17 MLB and 29 NL records, Bob Gibson's 1.12 earned run average (ERA) in 1968, Whitey Herzog's Whiteyball, Mark McGwire breaking the single-season home run record in 1998, and the 2011 championship team's unprecedented comebacks. The Cardinals have won 105 or more games in four different seasons and won 100 or more a total of nine times. Cardinals players have won 20 league MVPs, four batting Triple Crowns, and three Cy Young Awards. Baseball Hall of Fame inductees include Lou Brock, Dizzy Dean, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Rogers Hornsby, Joe Medwick, Stan Musial, Branch Rickey, Red Schoendienst, Ozzie Smith, and Bruce Sutter.

In 2018, Forbes valued the Cardinals at $1.9 billion, making them the 7th-most valuable franchise in MLB; their revenue the previous year was $319 million, and their operating income was $40.0 million. Since their purchase in 1995, owner William DeWitt, Jr.'s investment group has seen enormous growth from the $147 million purchase price. John Mozeliak is the President of Baseball Operations, Mike Girsch is the general manager and Mike Shildt is the manager. The Cardinals are renowned for their strong fan support: despite being in one of the sport's mid-level markets, they routinely see attendances among the league's highest, and are consistently among the Top 3 in MLB in local television ratings.

Whiteyball

Whiteyball is a style of playing baseball that was developed by former Major League Baseball manager Whitey Herzog. The term was coined by the press during the 1982 World Series to describe the style of Herzog's St. Louis Cardinals. The team won the Series without a typical power hitter, instead using speed on the base paths, solid pitching, excellent defense, and line drive base hits. Whiteyball was well-suited to the fast, hard AstroTurf surface that Busch Memorial Stadium had at the time, which created large, unpredictable bounces when the ball hit it at sharp angles. In his book "White Rat", Herzog says the approach was a response to the spacious, artificial surface stadiums of the time. He said of the media's dismay at his teams' success:

They seemed to think there was something wrong with the way we played baseball, with speed and defense and line-drive hitters. They called it "Whitey-ball" and said it couldn't last.

Herzog used this strategy until he left the Cardinals in 1990.

A 2012 sports article described Whiteyball as follows:

"The '82 Series marked the start of Whiteyball, the Herzog style which stressed base running and pitching, though Herzog attributes that to the nature of Busch Stadium II, which didn't reward the long ball."Herzog used many switch-hitters such as Ozzie Smith, Willie McGee, Tom Herr, Terry Pendleton, Vince Coleman, José Oquendo, Garry Templeton, Ted Simmons, Luis Alicea, Mike Ramsey, Tony Scott, and Félix José in St. Louis, along with Willie Wilson and U L Washington when he managed in Kansas City. Kansas City Royals manager Ned Yost used his own version of Whiteyball to get to the 2014 World Series.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.