Tarbell Brook

Tarbell Brook is a 10.1-mile-long (16.3 km)[1] stream located in southwestern New Hampshire and northern Massachusetts in the United States. It is a tributary of the Millers River, itself a tributary of the Connecticut River, which flows to Long Island Sound.

Tarbell Brook rises in the northeast corner of the town of Fitzwilliam, New Hampshire, and southeast into Rindge, where it receives the outflow of Pearly Lake and continues south to the Damon Reservoirs. The brook then passes into Winchendon, Massachusetts, reaching the Millers River approximately two miles west of the town center.

Coordinates: 42°41′15″N 72°04′54″W / 42.68750°N 72.08167°W

Tarbell Brook, Winchendon MA
Tarbell Brook in Winchendon, Massachusetts

History

It bears the name of Lieutenant Samuel Tarbell (1744-1828), a Revolutionary War Minuteman soldier who settled in Rindge with his wife Beatrice Carter in 1773, soon thereafter building a water powered mill at the outflow of Pearly Lake (formerly known as Tarbell Pond). Although the mill is long gone, Tarbell's Cape Cod style house nearby still presides over Route 119.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ New Hampshire GRANIT state geographic information system Archived 2013-08-03 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Samuel Tarbell grave information
Connecticut Lakes

The Connecticut Lakes are a group of lakes in Coos County, northern New Hampshire, United States, situated along the headwaters of the Connecticut River. They are accessed via the northernmost segment of U.S. Route 3, between the village of Pittsburg and the Canada port of entry south of Chartierville, Quebec. The lakes are located within the boundaries of Pittsburg, but are far from the town center. Connecticut Lakes State Forest adjoins them.

There are four lakes: First, Second, Third and Fourth Connecticut Lake, numerically running south to north. The lakes decrease in size and increase in elevation, sequentially from first to fourth. The fourth lake is the source of the Connecticut River. The first three lakes can be viewed and accessed from U.S. Route 3, while the only access to the fourth lake is via the Fourth Connecticut Lake Trail, which goes in and out of Canada. All lakes are north of the 45th parallel.

Lake Francis lies to the south of the four Connecticut Lakes. It is a man-made reservoir and the last of the major lakes along the Connecticut River in northern New Hampshire.

Dublin Pond

Dublin Pond or Dublin Lake is a 236-acre (0.96 km2) water body located in Cheshire County in southwestern New Hampshire, United States, in the town of Dublin. The pond lies at an elevation of 1,480 feet (451 m) above sea level, near the height of land between the Connecticut River/Long Island Sound watershed to the west and the Merrimack River/Gulf of Maine watershed to the east.

Lake Francis (Murphy Dam)

Lake Francis is a reservoir on the Connecticut River in northern New Hampshire, United States. The lake is located in Coos County, east of the village of Pittsburg and along the boundary between the towns of Pittsburg and Clarksville. The lake is impounded by Murphy Dam, built in 1940 as a flood control project. The 117-foot (36 m) earthen dam is owned by the Water Division of the state's Department of Environmental Services, and is operated by TC Energy (formerly TransCanada Corporation).Lake Francis and Murphy Dam are named after Francis P. Murphy, who served as the Governor of New Hampshire from 1937 to 1941. The lake covers nearly 2,000 acres (8 km2), has a capacity of 131,375 acre feet (162,049,000 m3), and has average and maximum depths of 40 feet (12 m) and 82 feet (25 m), respectively.The lake is classified as a coldwater fishery, with observed species including rainbow trout, brown trout, landlocked salmon, lake trout, and chain pickerel. There are two public boat launch locations, and ice fishing is permitted from January through March.Lake Francis State Park is located on the northeast side of the lake, where the Connecticut River flows in. North of Lake Francis is Back Lake, while First Connecticut Lake (one of a series of four Connecticut Lakes that serve as the headwaters of the Connecticut River) lies to the northeast.

List of rivers of New Hampshire

This is a list of rivers and significant streams in the U.S. state of New Hampshire.

All watercourses named "River" (freshwater or tidal) are listed here, as well as other streams which are either subject to the New Hampshire Comprehensive Shoreland Protection Act or are more than 10 miles (16 km) long. New Hampshire rivers and streams qualify for state shoreland protection (and are listed here in bold) if they are fourth-order or larger water bodies, based on the Strahler method of stream order classification.

Millers River

The Millers River is a 52.1-mile-long (83.8 km) river in northern Massachusetts, originating in Ashburnham and joining the Connecticut River just downstream from Millers Falls, Massachusetts. The river was formerly known as Paquag or Baquag, a Nipmuc word meaning "clear water". Sections of the river are used for whitewater kayaking, and a section upriver is popular with flatwater racers (canoe racing).

Oquaga Creek

Oquaga Creek is a river in Broome County and Chenango County in New York. It flows into the West Branch Delaware River by Deposit, New York.

Pearly Lake

Pearly Lake or Pearly Pond is a 192-acre (0.8 km2) water body in the town of Rindge, Cheshire County, southwestern New Hampshire, United States. Formerly known as Tarbell Pond, named for Revolutionary War Minuteman Lieut. Samuel Tarbell (1744-1828) who settled here, the lake is one of the headwaters of Tarbell Brook, a tributary of the Millers River, which flows southwest to the Connecticut River at Millers Falls, Massachusetts.The undergraduate campus of Franklin Pierce University is located on the northeast shore of the lake.

The lake is classified as a warmwater fishery, with observed species including largemouth bass, chain pickerel, yellow perch, bluegill, horned pout, American eel, and green sunfish.

Saville Dam

Saville Dam is an earthen embankment dam with masonry work on the eastern branch of the Farmington River in southwestern Barkhamsted, Connecticut. The dam is 135 ft. (41 m) tall and 1,950 ft. (590 m) long and has an uncontrolled spillway on its western portion. It creates the Barkhamsted Reservoir which has a volume of 36.8 billion US gallons (139,000,000 m3) and is the primary water source for Hartford, Connecticut.

In 1927, the Metropolitan District Commission began to purchase land in the present-day footprint of the dam and reservoir. Construction of the dam commenced in 1936 while land to the north was being stripped of lumber and buildings.

Before the Metropolitan District Commission named the Saville Dam in 1940 in honor of its chief engineer, Caleb Mills Saville, it was referred to as the Bill's Brook Dam after the brook that ran near the site at the time.

The foundations for "Bill's Brook Dam" and the diversion tunnel for the East Branch of the Farmington River were completed in August 1934. Subsequently, the East Branch was diverted into the concrete conduit at the bottom of the Bill's Brook Dam site. The dam was completed in May 1940, at a total cost for dam and reservoir of $10M.Although the Saville Dam was completed in 1940, it was not until 1948 that the Barkhamsted Reservoir finally filled to capacity. The Farmington River East Branch is impounded for nearly 8 miles (13 km) behind the dam, with the northernmost open waters of Barkhamsted Reservoir terminating in Hartland, Connecticut just south of the Massachusetts border.The reservoir flooded many buildings and farms of Barkhamsted, including the village of Barkhamsted Hollow. The village of Barkhamsted Center, partially flooded, lies just to the west of the reservoir. Its remaining buildings are part of the Barkhamsted Center Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Tarbell

Tarbell may refer to:

USS Tarbell (DD-142), a US Navy destroyer

Tarbell Cassette Interface, for storing computer data on audio cassette

Tarbell Course in Magic, an encyclopedia of magic written by Harlan TarbellPeople with the surname Tarbell:

Edmund Charles Tarbell (1862 – 1938), American impressionist painter

Frank Bigelow Tarbell (1853 – 1920), American historian and archeologist

Harlan Tarbell (1890 – 1960), American stage magician and illustrator

Ida M. Tarbell (1857 – 1944), American author and journalist

Jim Tarbell, Cincinnati councilman

Joseph Tarbell (1780 – 1815), American naval officer

Tarbell Brook (New York)

Tarbell Brook flows into the Oquaga Creek by McClure, New York.

Atlantic Ocean
Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
Narragansett Bay
Upper New York Bay
Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
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