Tanaga (volcano)

Tanaga (Aleut: Kusuuginax̂)[2] is a 5,924-foot (1,806 m) stratovolcano in the Aleutian Range of the U.S. state of Alaska. There have been three known eruptions since 1763. The most recent was in 1914 and produced lava flows.

Tanaga
Tanaga2003
Tanaga
Highest point
Elevation5,925 ft (1,806 m) [1]
Prominence5,925 ft (1,806 m) [1]
Listing
Coordinates51°53′02″N 178°08′29″W / 51.88389°N 178.14139°WCoordinates: 51°53′02″N 178°08′29″W / 51.88389°N 178.14139°W
Geography
Tanaga is located in Alaska
Tanaga
Tanaga
Alaska
LocationTanaga Island, Alaska, U.S.
Parent rangeAleutian Range
Geology
Mountain typeStratovolcano
Volcanic arc/beltAleutian Arc
Last eruption1914

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Alaska & Hawaii P1500s - the Ultras". PeakList.org. Retrieved 2013-01-06.
  2. ^ Bergsland, K. (1994). Aleut Dictionary. Fairbanks: Alaska Native Language Center.

External links

Arc Dome

Arc Dome is the highest mountain of the Toiyabe Range in northwestern Nye County, Nevada, United States. It is the thirteenth-highest mountain in the state. Arc Dome also ranks as the second-most topographically prominent peak in Nye County and the eighth-most prominent peak in the state. The peak is located about 53 miles (85 km) north of the community of Tonopah, within the Arc Dome Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.

Arc Dome is sometimes confused with Toiyabe Dome. The fact that the summit benchmark is marked “Toiyabe Dome” only adds to this confusion. However, these are separate peaks. Toiyabe Dome at 11,361 feet (3,463 m) is about 5 miles (8.0 km) southeast of Arc Dome, above the small community of Carvers, Nevada.

Delano Peak

Delano Peak is the highest point in the Tushar Mountains of south-central Utah. The Tushars are the third-highest range in the state, after the Uinta Mountains and the La Sal Range, though Delano itself is surpassed in height by at least thirty-one other Utah peaks.

Located in the Fishlake National Forest, Delano Peak is the highest point in both Beaver and Piute counties. The mountain is named for Columbus Delano (1809–1896), Secretary of the Interior during the Grant administration.

Deseret Peak

Deseret Peak is the highest peak in the Stansbury Mountains. It is located in the Deseret Peak Wilderness area west of Grantsville, Utah and east of Skull Valley Indian Reservation. The site is a popular destination for hikers as the area is a contrast of the alpine wilderness with the surrounding desert basin. The trail that leads to the peak is easily accessible from Salt Lake City. The mountain offers views of the Bonneville Salt Flats, the Great Salt Lake, and the surrounding towns and mountain ranges. On a clear day, it is possible to see Mount Nebo, the highest peak in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains.

Granite Peak (Humboldt County, Nevada)

Granite Peak is the highest mountain in both the Santa Rosa Range and Humboldt County, in Nevada, United States. It is the eighteenth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The peak is located within the Santa Rosa Ranger District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, about 12 miles north of the small town of Paradise Valley and 23 miles southeast of the small town of McDermitt. It is the highest mountain for over 80 miles in all directions.

Hayford Peak

Hayford Peak, elevation 9,924 feet (3,025 m), is the highest mountain in the Sheep Range of Clark County, Nevada, United States. It is the seventh-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The nearest taller mountain is Mount Charleston, 34 miles (55 km) to the southwest. In the winter months, there is snow on the peak, which usually lasts until early spring.

List of Aleutian Island volcanoes

Akutan Volcano

Amak Volcano

Amukta Volcano

Bobrof Volcano

Bogoslof Volcano

Buldir Volcano

Chagulak Volcano

Carlisle Volcano

Cleveland Volcano

Davidof Volcano

Gareloi Volcano

Great Sitkin Volcano

Herbert Volcano

Kagamil Volcano

Kanaga Volcano

Kasatochi Volcano

Kiska Volcano

Koniuji Volcano

Korovin Volcano

Little Sitkin Volcano

Pogromni Volcano

Seguam Volcano

Segula Volcano

Semisopochnoi Volcano

Tanaga Volcano

Uliaga Volcano

Vsevidof Volcano

Yunaska Volcano

List of Ultras of the United States

The following sortable table comprises the 128 ultra-prominent summits of the United States of America. Each of these peaks has at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence.The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.Denali is one of only three summits on Earth with more than 6000 meters (19,685 feet) of topographic prominence. Three summits of the United States exceed 4000 meters (13,123 feet), six exceed 3500 meters (11,483 feet), ten exceed 3000 meters (9843 feet), 19 exceed 2500 meters (8202 feet), 45 exceed 2000 meters (6562 feet), the following 128 ultra-prominent summits exceed 1500 meters (4921 feet), and 264 major summits exceed 1000 meters (3281 feet) of topographic prominence.

List of extreme summits of North America

This article comprises four sortable tables of mountain summits of greater North America that are the higher than any other point north or south of their latitude or east or west their longitude in North America.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of extreme summits of the United States

This article comprises four sortable tables of mountain summits of the United States that are higher than any other point north or south of their latitude or east or west of their longitude in the U.S.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.

List of mountain peaks of Alaska

This article comprises three sortable tables of major mountain peaks of the U.S. State of Alaska.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 100 highest major summits of Alaska by elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 100 most prominent summits of Alaska.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 50 most isolated major summits of Alaska.

List of the highest islands of North America

The following sortable table comprises the 76 highest ocean islands of greater North America. Each of these islands rises at least 1000 meters (3281 feet) above the sea.

This article defines the ocean islands of greater North America to include the coastal islands of North America, the islands of the Caribbean Sea, the Lucayan Archipelago, the islands of Greenland (Kalaallit Nunaat), the islands of Canada, and the islands of Alaska. The Hawaiian Islands are not included because they are considered part of Oceania.

List of the ultra-prominent summits of Alaska

The following sortable table comprises the 65 ultra-prominent summits of the U.S. State of Alaska. Each of these peaks has at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence.

Topographic elevation is the vertical distance above the reference geoid, a mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface. The topographic prominence of a summit is the elevation difference between that summit and the highest or key col to a higher summit. The topographic isolation of a summit is the minimum great-circle distance to a point of equal elevation.

This article defines a significant summit as a summit with at least 100 meters (328.1 feet) of topographic prominence, and a major summit as a summit with at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence. An ultra-prominent summit is a summit with at least 1500 meters (4921 feet) of topographic prominence. There are 126 ultra-prominent summits in the United States.

If an elevation or prominence is calculated as a range of values, the arithmetic mean is shown.

Mount Jefferson (Nevada)

Mount Jefferson is the highest mountain in both the Toquima Range and Nye County in Nevada, United States. It is the sixth highest mountain in the state. As the high point of a range which is well separated from other ranges by low basins, Mount Jefferson has a high topographic prominence of 5,861 feet (1,786 m). This makes it the most prominent peak in Nye County and the third most prominent peak in Nevada (after Charleston Peak and Wheeler Peak). For similar reasons, it is also the highest mountain for over 90 miles in all directions. It is located about 50 miles (80 km) northeast of the county seat of Tonopah within the Alta Toquima Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, near the smaller towns of Carvers and Round Mountain. Three distinct summits are located on a broad area of subalpine tundra: North Summit rises to 11,820 feet (3,603 m), Middle Summit to 11,692 feet (3,564 m), and South Summit to 11,949 feet (3,642 m). During the Pleistocene, alpine glaciers eroded several cirques east of the summit plateau.

Mount Peale

Mount Peale is the highest point in the La Sal Mountains of San Juan County, in the southeastern part of Utah, United States. It is also the highest point in Utah outside the Uinta Mountains. It is located about 20 mi (32 km) southeast of Moab. The summit is the highest point in the Manti-La Sal National Forest and the Mount Peale Research Natural Area. Mount Peale was named for Albert Peale, a mineralogist on the Hayden Survey of 1875.The La Sal Mountains sit on the arid Colorado Plateau, near such famous desert landmarks as Canyonlands National Park and Arches National Park. However, due to their height, the La Sals are heavily forested and usually snow-capped until early summer (there is one snowfield on the north side that usually lasts year round). Mount Peale can be seen on a clear day from the Wasatch Plateau of central Utah, near Orangeville, over 115 miles (190 km) away.

Mount Peale can be accessed from various directions, but is most commonly climbed from the area of La Sal Pass, 10,125 ft (3,086 m), about 3 mi (5 km) to the southwest of the peak. La Sal Pass is accessed from the southeast via a graded gravel road. From the pass the summit is obtained by a short but steep off-trail hike of about 2.5 mi (4.0 km) with about 2,600 ft (800 m) of elevation gain. The route often involves some travel on snow, even in summer.

North Schell Peak

North Schell Peak is the highest mountain in the Schell Creek Range of White Pine County, Nevada, United States. It is the ninth-highest mountain in the state, and also ranks as the fifth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The summit is 19 miles (31 km) northeast of the community of Ely within the High Schells Wilderness of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest.

Pilot Peak (Nevada)

Pilot Peak (Shoshoni: Waahkai) is the highest mountain in the Pilot Range in extreme eastern Elko County, Nevada, United States. It is the most topographically prominent peak in Elko County and the fourth-most prominent peak in Nevada. The peak is on public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and thus has no access restrictions.

Ruby Dome

Ruby Dome is the highest mountain in both the Ruby Mountains and Elko County, in Nevada, United States. It is the twenty-seventh-highest mountain in the state, and also ranks as the thirteenth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The peak is located about 21 miles (34 km) southeast of the city of Elko within the Ruby Mountains Ranger District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. The mountain rises from a base elevation of about 6,000 feet (1,800 m) to a height of 11,387 feet (3,471 m). It is the highest mountain for over 90 miles in all directions.

Star Peak (Nevada)

Star Peak is both the highest and most topographically prominent mountain in both the Humboldt Range and Pershing County in Nevada, United States. It is the sixth-most topographically prominent peak in Nevada. The peak is on public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and has no access restrictions.

Tanaga Island

Tanaga Island (Aleut: Tanax̂ax) is an island in the western Andreanof Islands, in the southwest part of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. The island has a land area of 204 square miles (528 square kilometres), making it the 33rd largest oceanic island in the United States. Its highest point is volcano Mount Tanaga (Aleut: Kusuuginax̂) at 5,925 feet (1,806 metres).

Tanaga Island measures 43 kilometres (27 miles) long and 38 kilometres (24 miles) wide.

Tanaga Island is about 62 miles (100 kilometres) west of Adak Island, the nearest inhabited island. There are several large waterfalls on Tanaga Island. Tanaga Island is uninhabited, but several cabins are shown on the NOAA nautical chart, as well as some Aleut villages on the east side of the island.There are no native land mammals on Tanaga Island.

Tanaga Island was established as a Navy emergency landing field in July 1943 as an adjunct to the Adak Naval Operation Base. Navy Seabees built a runway, small-craft pier, mooring area, office and storage buildings, radio building, galley and mess facilities, dispensary, and 4 miles (6 kilometres) of gravel road in 1943, near Lash Bay in the southwest of the island. The site was abandoned in 1945. The control tower is still shown on nautical charts.

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