Tales of the Zombie

Tales of the Zombie was an American black-and-white horror comics magazine published by Magazine Management, a corporate sibling of Marvel Comics. The series ran 10 issues and one annual publication from 1973 to 1975, many featuring stories of the zombie Simon Garth by writer Steve Gerber and artist Pablo Marcos.

A magazine rather than a comic book, it did not fall under the purview of the comics industry's self-censorship Comics Code Authority, allowing the title to feature stronger content — such as moderate profanity, partial nudity, and more graphic violence — than color comics of the time.

Tales of the Zombie
TalesOfTheZombie1
Tales of the Zombie #1 (Aug. 1973).
Art by Boris Vallejo.
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
Schedulequarterly
FormatOngoing series
Genre
Publication dateAugust 1973 – March 1975
No. of issues10, and 1 annual publication
Main character(s)Simon Garth
Brother Voodoo
Creative team
Written bySteve Gerber, Tony Isabella, Doug Moench, Carl Wessler, Chris Claremont
Artist(s)Pablo Marcos, Alfredo Alcala, Ernie Chan, Win Mortimer, Tony DiPreta, Crusty Bunkers
Penciller(s)Syd Shores, Dick Ayers, John Buscema, Virgilio Redondo, Yong Montano, Ron Wilson, Rich Buckler
Inker(s)Tom Palmer, Pablo Marcos, Alfredo Alcala
Editor(s)Roy Thomas (issues #1–10)
Marv Wolfman (#3–10)
Tony Isabella (#7 & 8)
David Anthony Kraft (#9 & 10)
Don McGregor (#9 & 10)
John Warner (#10)
Collected editions
Tales of the ZombieISBN 0-7851-1916-7

Publication history

Copyrighted as simply Zombie and commonly known by its trademarked cover title, Tales of the Zombie, the magazine ran 10 issues cover-dated 1973 - March 1975. With sister titles including Dracula Lives!, Monsters Unleashed and Vampire Tales, it was published by Marvel Comics' parent company, Magazine Management, and related corporations, under the brand emblem Marvel Monster Group.[1][2]

To star in the new title, Marvel's then-editor-in-chief Roy Thomas plucked Simon Garth, a character from a standalone, 1950s horror tale created by Stan Lee and Bill Everett, introduced in Marvel predecessor Atlas Comics' Menace #5 (July 1953). This was a story published prior to the comics industry's self-censorship Comics Code Authority, which among other strictures forbade zombies. This seven-page storty was reprinted in Tales of the Zombie #1 (with the art slightly altered to give Simon Garth shoulder-length rather than short hair) as the continuation of a new, 12-page prequel story co-scripted by Thomas and Steve Gerber and drawn by John Buscema and Tom Palmer.[3]

Following the premiere, all the Zombie stories were by Gerber and artist Pablo Marcos (one of these in collaboration with writer Doug Moench and artist Alfredo Alcala). The original series' finale, set at Garth's daughter's wedding in issue #9, was a three-chapter story written by Tony Isabella (chapter 2 with co-scripter Chris Claremont), drawn by pencilers Virgilio Redondo, Yong Montano, and Ron Wilson, respectively, and inker by Alcala (chapters 1-2) and Marcos (chapter 3). Simon Garth was laid to peaceful rest in Tales of the Zombie #9; the following, final issue contained a Brother Voodoo story and three anthological tales. (Brother Voodoo also appeared in a backup feature in issue #6.)[1]

In addition to reprinting the original 1950s Simon Garth story, the magazine reprinted other pre-Comics Code stories, including work by artists Win Mortimer and Tony DiPreta.[1] Painted covers to the series were done by artists including Boris Vallejo and Earl Norem.[1]

An annual publication formally titled Tales of the Zombie Annual was published in 1975, reprinting stories from the magazine.[4]

Collections

All 10 issues of Tales of the Zombie and the annual were collected in an Essential Marvel edition in 2006.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Zombie at the Grand Comics Database.
  2. ^ Marvel Monster Group (brand emblem) at the Grand Comics Database.
  3. ^ Zombie #1 at the Grand Comics Database.
  4. ^ Tales of the Zombie Annual at the Grand Comics Database.
  5. ^ Essential Tales of the Zombie at the Grand Comics Database.

External links

1975 in comics

Notable events of 1975 in comics. See also List of years in comics.

This is a list of comics-related events in 1975.

Black Talon (comics)

The Black Talon is the name of a number of fictional supervillains appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Brother Voodoo

Brother Voodoo (Jericho Drumm) is a fictional character, a supernatural superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He first appeared in Strange Tales #169 (Sept. 1973). The character was created by publisher Stan Lee, Roy Thomas, Len Wein, and artist John Romita Sr. Since replacing Doctor Strange as Sorcerer Supreme in The New Avengers #53 (July 2009), the character is referred to as Doctor Voodoo.

Carl Wessler

Carroll O. Wessler (May 25, 1913 – April 9, 1989), better known as Carl Wessler, was an American animator of the 1930s and a comic book writer from the 1940s though the 1980s for such companies as DC Comics, EC Comics, Marvel Comics, and Warren Publishing.

Wessler was one of at least five staff writers (officially titled editors) under editor-in-chief Stan Lee at Marvel's 1950s forerunner, Atlas Comics.

Dracula Lives!

Dracula Lives! was an American black-and-white horror comics magazine published by Magazine Management, a corporate sibling of Marvel Comics. The series ran 13 issues and one annual publication from 1973 to 1975, and starred the Marvel version of the literary vampire Dracula.

A magazine rather than a comic book, it did not fall under the purview of the comics industry's self-censorship Comics Code Authority, allowing the title to feature stronger content — such as moderate profanity, partial nudity, and more graphic violence — than color comics of the time. featuring Dracula stories.

Running concurrently with the longer-running Marvel comic The Tomb of Dracula, the continuities of the two titles occasionally overlapped, with storylines weaving between the two. Most of the time, however, the stories in Dracula Lives! were standalone Dracula tales by various creative teams. Later issues of Dracula Lives! featured a serialized adaptation of the original Bram Stoker novel, written by Roy Thomas and drawn by Dick Giordano.

Ernie Chan

Ernesto "Ernie" Chan (July 27, 1940 – May 16, 2012), born and sometimes credited as Ernie Chua, was a Filipino-American comics artist, known for work published by Marvel Comics and DC Comics, including many Marvel issues of series featuring Conan the Barbarian. Chan also had a long tenure on Batman and Detective Comics. Other than his work on Batman, Chan primarily focused on non-superhero characters, staying mostly in the genres of horror, war, and sword and sorcery.

Essential Marvel

Essential Marvel is a line published by Marvel Comics that reprints vintage comic book material in paperback format. Each black-and-white volume reprints approximately 20-30 issues of a classic Marvel title (mostly from the Silver Age or Bronze Age). Each Essential contains between 450 and 650 pages, printed on coarse, matte-quality paper.

DC Comics has a similar range of black-and-white reprint paperbacks, Showcase Presents (in the same way, the Marvel Masterworks line is the equivalent of DC's DC Archive Editions).

List of comics magazines published by Magazine Management in the 1970s

Magazine Management, the magazine and comic-book publishing parent of Marvel Comics at the time, released a number of magazine-format comics in the 1970s, primarily from 1973 to 1977, in the market dominated by Warren Publishing. The line of mostly black-and-white, anthology magazines predominantly featured horror, sword and sorcery, and science fiction. The magazines did not carry the Marvel name, but were produced by Marvel staffers and freelancers, and featured characters regularly found in Marvel comic books, as well as some creator-owned material. In addition to the many horror titles, magazines in this group included Savage Sword of Conan, The Deadly Hands of Kung Fu, Marvel Preview, and Planet of the Apes.

The magazine format did not fall under the purview of the comics industry's self-censorship Comics Code Authority, allowing the titles to feature stronger content than mainstream color comic books, such as moderate profanity, partial nudity, and more graphic violence.

In addition to original content, many issues included reprinted material, including a number of horror stories from Marvel's 1950s predecessor Atlas Comics that originally were published before the 1954 introduction of the Comics Code.

Marvel Presents

Marvel Presents was an American comic book anthology series published by Marvel Comics. Twelve issues were published from October 1975 to August 1977.

Marvel Preview

Marvel Preview is a black-and-white comics magazine published by Magazine Management for 14 issues and the affiliated Marvel Comics Group for 10 issues. The final issue additionally carried the imprint Marvel Magazines Group.

Menace (Atlas Comics)

Menace was a 1953 to 1954 American crime/horror anthology comic book series published by Atlas Comics, the 1950s precursor of Marvel Comics. It is best known for the first appearance of the supernatural Marvel character the Zombie, in a standalone story that became the basis for the 1970s black-and-white comics magazine Tales of the Zombie. As well, a standalone story in the final issue introduced a robot character that was revived decades later as the Human Robot, a.k.a. M-11, the Human Robot.

The 11-issue series (March 1953 - May 1954) included art by such 1940s Golden Age of Comic Books creators as Bill Everett and George Tuska, and such future industry stars as Gene Colan, Russ Heath, Joe Maneely, John Romita Sr., and Joe Sinnott. As well, the first eight issues were written completely by Atlas editor-in-chief Stan Lee, the future architect of Marvel Comics' rise as a pop-cultural phenomenon.

Monsters Unleashed (comics)

Monsters Unleashed is the title of an American black-and-white comics magazine published by Magazine Management and two color comic-book miniseries from Marvel Comics. The first ran from 1973 to 1975. The two miniseries ran consecutively in 2017.

Pablo Marcos

Pablo Marcos Ortega, known professionally as Pablo Marcos (born March 31, 1937), is a comic book artist and commercial illustrator best known as one of his home country's leading cartoonists and for his work on such popular American comics characters as Batman and Conan the Barbarian, particularly during the 1970s. His signature character was Marvel Comics' the Zombie, for which Marcos drew all but one story in the black-and-white horror-comics magazine Tales of the Zombie (1973–1975).

Richard Rory

Richard Rory is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He initially was a sort of author surrogate or alter ego for writer Steve Gerber, though Gerber is also shown to exist in the Marvel Universe. He was introduced in Man-Thing Volume 1, #2, a bit of a loner who rather easily befriended the nearly mindless monster. When in rural areas, he was frequently belittled for having a college education and a rather left-wing perspective. Later, under the pen of David Anthony Kraft, he became friends with She-Hulk, with slight romantic overtones that went nowhere. The character is named after Richard Cory, a nearly opposite character whose song was playing on the radio when Gerber created the character.

Ron Wilson (comics)

Ron Wilson (born February 16) is an American comics artist known for his work on comic books starring the Marvel Comics character The Thing, including the titles Marvel Two-in-One and The Thing. Wilson spent eleven years, from 1975 to 1986, chronicling The Thing's adventures through different comic titles.

Vampire Tales

Vampire Tales was an American black-and-white horror comics magazine published by Magazine Management, a corporate sibling of Marvel Comics. The series ran 11 issues and one annual publication from 1973 to 1975, and featuring vampires as both protagonists and antagonists.

A magazine rather than a comic book, it did not fall under the purview of the comics industry's self-censorship Comics Code Authority, allowing the title to feature stronger content — such as moderate profanity, partial nudity, and more graphic violence — than color comics of the time, featuring Dracula stories.

Virgilio Redondo

Virgilio "Virgil" Redondo y Purugganan (March 28, 1926 – April 13, 1997) was a Filipino comic book writer and artist.

Win Mortimer

James Winslow Mortimer (May 1, 1919 – January 11, 1998) was a Canadian comic book and comic strip artist best known as one of the major illustrators of the DC Comics superhero Superman. He additionally drew for Marvel Comics, Gold Key Comics, and other publishers.

He was a 2006 inductee into the Canadian comics creators Joe Shuster Hall of Fame.

Zombie (comics)

The Zombie (Simon William Garth) is a fictional supernatural character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer Stan Lee and artist Bill Everett for the standalone story "Zombie" in the horror-anthology comic book Menace #5 (cover-dated July 1953), which was published by Atlas Comics, a forerunner to Marvel. The character later became well known for starring in the black-and-white, horror-comic magazine series Tales of the Zombie (1973–1975), usually in stories by Steve Gerber and Pablo Marcos.

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