Syllabus

A syllabus (/ˈsɪləbəs/; plural syllabuses[1] or syllabi[2]) or specification is an academic document that communicates information about a specific course and defines expectations and responsibilities. It is descriptive (unlike the prescriptive or specific curriculum). A syllabus may be set out by an exam board or prepared by the professor who supervises or controls course qualities.

There are seven essential components to an academic syllabus: Instructor information, General course information, Course objectives, Course policies, Grading and evaluation, Learning resources, and the Course Calendar.

Definition

The syllabus is a "contract between faculty members and their students, designed to answer students' questions about a course, as well as inform them about what will happen should they fail to meet course expectations." [3] It is also a "vehicle for expressing accountability and commitment" (2005, p. 63).[4] Over time, the notion of a syllabus as a contract has grown more literal but is not in fact an enforceable contract.[5]

Etymology

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word syllabus derives from modern Latin syllabus "list", in turn from a misreading of the Greek σίττυβας sittybas "parchment label, table of contents", which first occurred in a 15th-century print of Cicero's letters to Atticus.[1][6] Earlier Latin dictionaries such as Lewis and Short contain the word syllabus,[7] relating it to the non-existent Greek word σύλλαβος, which appears to be a mistaken reading of syllaba "syllable"; the newer Oxford Latin Dictionary does not contain this word.[8] The apparent change from sitty- to sylla- is explained as a hypercorrection by analogy to συλλαμβάνω (syllambano "bring together, gather").[8]

Purpose

The syllabus ensures a fair and impartial understanding between the instructor and students such that there is minimal confusion on policies relating to the course, setting clear expectations of material to be learned, behavior in the classroom, and effort on student's behalf to be put into the course, providing a roadmap of course organization/direction relaying the instructor's teaching philosophy to the students, and providing a marketing angle of the course such that students may choose early in the course whether the subject material is attractive.

Many generalized items of a syllabus can be amplified in a specific curriculum to maximize efficient learning by clarifying student understanding of specified material such as grading policy, grading rubric, late work policy, locations and times, other contact information for instructor and teaching assistant such as phone or email, materials required and/or recommended such as textbooks, assigned reading books, calculators (or other equipment), lab vouchers, etc., outside resources for subject material assistance (extracurricular books, tutor locations, resource centers, etc.), important dates in course such as exams and paper due-dates, tips for succeeding in mastering course content such as study habits and expected time allotment, suggested problems if applicable, necessary pre-requisites or co-requisites to current course, safety rules if appropriate, and objectives of the course.

A syllabus will often contain a reading list of relevant books and articles that are compulsory or optional for students to read. As an indirect effect of this, scholars can count how many online syllabi include their works as a way of estimating their educational impact.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "syllabus". Oxford English Dictionary (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. September 2005. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ Merriam-Webster Dictionary <https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/syllabus>
  3. ^ Slattery, J.M.; Carlson, J.F. (2005). "Preparing an effective syllabus: current best practices". College Teaching. 54 (4): 159–164. doi:10.3200/CTCH.53.4.159-164.
  4. ^ Habanek, D.V. (2005). "An examination of the integrity of the syllabus". College Teaching. 53 (2): 62–64. doi:10.3200/ctch.53.2.62-64.
  5. ^ Wasley, P. (2008). "The Syllabus Becomes a Repository of Legalese". The Chronicle of Higher Education. 54 (27).
  6. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary - Syllabus". Retrieved 22 August 2012.
  7. ^ syllabus. Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short. A Latin Dictionary on Perseus Project.
  8. ^ a b "The Curious and Quibbling History of "Syllabus" (part 2)". Epekteinomene. Retrieved 5 May 2014.
  9. ^ Kousha, K.; Thelwall, M. (2008). "Assessing the impact of disciplinary research on teaching: An automatic analysis of online syllabuses". Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 59 (13): 2060. doi:10.1002/asi.20920.
All India Secondary School Examination

All India Secondary School Examination (also known as AISSE) is a centralized public examination that students (belonging to CBSE-Affiliated schools) in India take after class 10. The Central Board of Secondary Education conducts the AISSE during the period of February every year even after implementing the ambitious project of CCE (Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation.) Now, that Central Board of Secondary Education has decided to discontinue the CCE pattern as a result JEE, NEET, etc. shall now be conducted by

National Testing Agency instead. In this exam, Mathematics, Science and S.S.T.(History, Geography, Democratic Politics, Economics) are compulsory with any two languages (official language and foreign/schedule languages). Students can also opt skill subject such as I.T., Painting, Yoga, Artificial intelligence and etc.. Successful candidates are awarded with the AISSE Secondary School Completion Certificate, a Statement of Marks and a Migration Certificate stating that the candidate has completed Secondary Schooling and can pursue higher education. For the 2017-18 academic year, the Central Board of Secondary Education has revived the old system of syllabus and marking scheme (complete syllabus for AISSE and marks out of 500.) Exams are to commence on 5 March 2018. India has state exams and central exams.

Bihar School Examination Board

The Bihar School Examination Board (abbreviated BSEB, 33027) is a statutory body under section 3 of Bihar School Examination Act - 1952 which is functioning under Government of Bihar devised to conduct examinations at secondary and senior secondary standard in both government and private schools belonging to state of Bihar on the basis of syllabus as prescribed by the Government of Bihar. It is headquartered at the capital of the state, Patna. Along with school examinations, it also conducts departmental examinations such as Diploma in Physical Education, Certificate in Physical Education and Teachers Eligibility Test (TET) for bihar state, Simultaltala Residential Entrance Examinations, Examination for Diploma in Elementary Education etc.

The board conducts secondary and senior secondary school examinations twice a year. One is the annual board examinations in February–March and the other is a supplementary examination held in August–September of every year.

Civil Services Examination (India)

The Civil Services Examination (CSE) is a nationwide competitive examination in India conducted by the Union Public Service Commission for recruitment to various Civil Services of the Government of India, including the Indian Administrative Service (IAS), Indian Foreign Service (IFS), and Indian Police Service (IPS). Also simply referred to as the UPSC examination, it is conducted in three phases - a preliminary examination consisting of two objective-type papers (General Studies Paper I and General Studies Paper II also popularly known as Civil Service Aptitude Test or CSAT), and a main examination consisting of nine papers of conventional (essay) type, in which two papers are qualifying and only marks of seven are counted followed by a personality test (interview).

Flight training

Flight training is a course of study used when learning to pilot an aircraft. The overall purpose of primary and intermediate flight training is the acquisition and honing of basic airmanship skills.Flight training can be conducted under a structured accredited syllabus with a flight instructor at a flight school or as private lessons with no syllabus with a flight instructor as long as all experience requirements for the desired pilot certificate/license are met.

Typically flight training consists of a combination of two parts:

Flight Lessons given in the aircraft or in a certified Flight Training Device

Ground School primarily given as a classroom lecture or lesson by a flight instructor where aeronautical theory is learned in preparation for the student's written, oral, and flight pilot certification/licensing examinations.Although there are various types of aircraft, many of the principles of piloting them have common techniques, especially those aircraft which are heavier-than-air types.Flight schools commonly rent aircraft to students and licensed pilots at an hourly rate. Typically the hourly rate is determined by the aircraft's Hobbs meter or Tach timer therefore the costumer is only charged while the aircraft engine is running. Flight instructors can also be scheduled with or without an aircraft for pilot proficiency and recurring training.The oldest flight training school still in existence is the Royal Air Force's (RAF's) Central Flying School formed in May 1912 at Upavon, United Kingdom. The oldest civil flight school still active in the world is based in Germany at the Wasserkuppe. It was founded as "Mertens Fliegerschule" and is currently named, "Fliegerschule Wasserkuppe".

GCE Ordinary Level

The O Level (Ordinary Level; official title: General Certificate of Education: Ordinary Level) is a subject-based qualification conferred as part of the General Certificate of Education. It was introduced as part of British educational reform alongside the more in-depth and academically rigorous A-level (official title of qualification: General Certificate of Education – Advanced Level) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Those three jurisdictions replaced O Levels gradually with General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) and International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) exams over time. The Scottish equivalent was the O-grade (replaced by the Standard Grade). The O Level qualification is still awarded by CIE Cambridge International Examinations, the international counterpart of the British examination Board OCR (Oxford, Cambridge & Royal Society of Arts), in select locations, instead of or alongside the International General Certificate of Secondary Education qualifications. Both CIE and OCR have Cambridge Assessment as their parent organisation. The Cambridge O Level has already been phased out, however, and is no longer available in certain administrative regions.

Headbanging

Headbanging is violently shaking one's head in time with music. It is common in the contemporary rock, punk and heavy metal music genres, where headbanging is often used by musicians on stage. In recent times, headbanging has become more common in various electronic dance music genres. Headbanging is also common in traditional Islamic Sufi music traditions such as Qawwali in the Indian subcontinent and Iran.

Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination

The Hong Kong Certificate of Education Examination (HKCEE, 香港中學會考) was a standardised examination between 1974 and 2011 after most local students' five-year secondary education, conducted by the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority (HKEAA), awarding the Hong Kong Certificate of Education secondary school leaving qualification. The examination has been discontinued in 2012 and its roles are now replaced by the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education as part of educational reforms in Hong Kong.

House dance

House dance is a social dance and Street dance primarily danced to house music, that has roots in the clubs of Chicago and of New York. The main elements of House dance include "Footwork", "Jacking", and "Lofting". House dance is often improvised and emphasizes fast and complex foot-oriented steps combined with fluid movements in the torso, as well as floor work.

List of schools in Bangladesh

This is a list of schools in Bangladesh. The syllabus most common in usage is the National Curriculum and Textbooks, which has two versions, a Bengali version and an English version. Edexcel and Cambridge syllabus are used for most of the English-medium schools. Other syllabi are also used, although rarely.

Melbourne shuffle

The Melbourne shuffle is a rave dance that developed in the 1980s. Typically performed to electronic music, the dance originated in the Melbourne rave scene, and was popular in the 1980s and 1990s. The dance moves involve a fast heel-and-toe movement or T-step, combined with a variation of the running man coupled with a matching arm action. The dance is improvised and involves "repeatedly shuffling your feet inwards, then outwards, while thrusting your arms up and down, or side to side, in time with the beat". Other moves can be incorporated including 360-degree spins and jumps and slides. Popular Melbourne clubs during the dance's heyday included Chasers, Heat, Mercury Lounge, Viper, Two Tribes and PHD.

Pogo (dance)

The pogo is a dance in which the dancers jump up and down, while either remaining on the spot or moving around; the dance takes its name from its resemblance to the use of a pogo stick, especially in a common version of the dance, where an individual keeps their torso stiff, their arms rigid, and their legs close together. Pogo dancing is most associated with punk rock, and is a precursor to moshing.

Quickstep

The quickstep is a light-hearted dance of the standard ballroom dances. The movement of the dance is fast and powerfully flowing and sprinkled with syncopations. The upbeat melodies that quickstep is danced to make it suitable for both formal and informal events. Quickstep was developed in the 1920s in New York City and was first danced by Caribbean and African dancers. Its origins are in combination of slow foxtrot combined with the Charleston, a dance which was one of the precursors to what today is called swing dancing.

Royal Academy of Dance

The Royal Academy of Dance (RAD) is a UK-based examination board specialising in dance education and training, with an emphasis on classical ballet. The RAD was founded in London, England in 1920 as the Association of Teachers of Operatic Dancing, and was granted a Royal Charter in 1935. Queen Elizabeth II is patron of the RAD, and Darcey Bussell was elected to serve as President in 2012, succeeding Antoinette Sibley who served as President for 21 years.

The RAD was created with the objective to improve the standard of ballet teaching in the UK and, in pursuit of that goal, a new teaching method and dance technique was devised for the Academy by a group of eminent European dancers. The RAD is one of the largest dance organisations in the world with over 14,000 members in 79 countries, including about 7,500 who hold Registered Teacher Status. There are currently about 1,000 students in full-time or part-time teacher training programmes with the RAD, and each year about 250,000 candidates enter RAD examinations worldwide.RAD exams are recognised by the national qualifications regulators of all for UK nations (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) with selected exams also carrying a UCAS tariff towards university admission. The RAD is also a validated awarding body of the Council for Dance Education and Training. The RAD works in partnership with the International Dance Teachers' Association. Royal Academy of Dance is charity 312826 registered in England and Wales. Royal Academy of Dance Enterprises Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of the RAD, which sells Academy branded merchandise, with all profits being gift-aided to the RAD.

Singapore-Cambridge GCE Ordinary Level

The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Ordinary Level (O-level) examination is a national examination held annually in Singapore. The examinations are jointly conducted by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE) as well as the Singapore Examinations and Assessment Board (SEAB).Despite the engagement of an identical examination board as partnering authority, the Singapore-Cambridge GCE Ordinary Level examination have no relation to the British GCSE examinations, having de-linked since 2006 when the Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE) took over the management of the national examination. This is owing to the stark differences in the development of the respective education systems in the two countries. Nevertheless, the qualification is recognised internationally as equivalent to the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE), taken by international candidates including Singaporean students who take the exam as private candidates, as well as the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examination taken by students in the United Kingdom.The national examination is taken by secondary school students at the end of their fourth year (for Express Stream) or fifth year (for Normal Academic Stream), and is open to private candidates. Recent studies show that approximately 30,000 students take the Singapore-Cambridge GCE O-Level exams annually.

Stage diving

Stage diving is the act of leaping from a concert stage onto the crowd below. It is often the precursor to crowd surfing.Long before the word was invented, public stagediving took place during the first Dutch concert by The Rolling Stones at the Kurhaus of Scheveningen on August 8, 1964.Many musicians have made stage diving a part of their stage act. Jim Morrison was an early performer known for having jumped into the crowd at several concerts. Iggy Pop is often credited with popularising stage diving in popular rock music. Initially seen as confrontational and extreme, stage diving has become common at hardcore punk and thrash metal performances.

Syllabus of Errors

The Syllabus of Errors (Latin: Syllabus Errorum) is a document issued by the Holy See under Pope Pius IX on December 8, 1864, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, as an annex to the Quanta cura encyclical. It condemns a total of 80 errors or heresies, and through that promulgated Catholic Church teaching on a number of philosophical and political questions, and referred to documents issued previously.

Reaction from Catholics was mixed, while that from Protestants was uniformly negative. The document remains controversial, and has been cited on numerous occasions by both Catholic traditionalists seeking to uphold traditional Catholic values and anti-Catholics seeking to criticize the church's positions.The purpose of the Syllabus was not to explain in depth the errors themselves, but only provide a list of them with a short paraphrasing of the error and references to the corresponding papal documents. The actual encyclicals listed reveal what it is about the error that is incorrect, and in which situations or nuances or emphasis. In order to understand the Pope’s argument against each error, one must read not only the error itself, but the document to which it points.

Telangana Board of Intermediate Education

Telangana State Board of Intermediate Education abbreviated TSBIE, is a Board of education in Telangana, India. It is established in 2014. It is located at Nampally, Hyderabad.

The board regulates and supervises the system of intermediate education in Telangana State. It executes and governs various activities that include devising of courses of study, prescribing syllabus, conducting examinations, granting affiliations to colleges and, providing direction, support and leadership for all educational institutions under its jurisdiction.

Honorable Minister of the State for Secondary Education acts as chairman and secretary to Government, Secondary Education as vice-chairman of the board. The secretary of I.A.S. Rank acts as the chief executive of the board.

United States Naval Aviator

A Naval Aviator is a commissioned officer or warrant officer qualified as a pilot in the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps or United States Coast Guard.

VT-10

Training Squadron TEN (VT-10) is a training squadron of the United States Navy. The squadron is homebased at NAS Pensacola, Florida.

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