Sweden women's national football team

The Sweden women's national football team (Swedish: svenska damfotbollslandslaget) represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers (1987, 1995, 2001). The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

The 2003 World Cup-final was the second most watched event in Sweden that year. Lotta Schelin is the top goalscorer in the history of Sweden with 85 goals. Schelin surpassed Hanna Ljungberg's 72-goal record against Germany on 29 October 2014.[4] The player with the most caps is Therese Sjögran, with 214. The team was coached by Thomas Dennerby from 2005 to 2012, and Pia Sundhage from 2012 to 2017. The head coach is Peter Gerhardsson.

After winning the two qualifying matches against Denmark for the Beijing 2008 Olympics, the Swedish Olympic Committee approved of record increases in investments for the women's team. The new budget granted over a million SEK (about US$150,000) for the team and 150,000 SEK (about US$25,000) per player for developing physical fitness. The new grants are almost a 100% increase of the 2005 and 2006 season funds.[5]

The developments and conditions of the Sweden women's national football team can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013.

Sweden
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Blågult
(The Blue and Yellow)
AssociationSvenska Fotbollförbundet (SvFF)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachPeter Gerhardsson
CaptainCaroline Seger
Most capsTherese Sjögran (214)[1]
Top scorerLotta Schelin (85)[2]
Home stadiumGamla Ullevi
FIFA codeSWE
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 6 Increase 3 (12 July 2019)[3]
Highest3 (June 2007)
Lowest11 (June 2018)
First international
 Sweden 0–0 Finland 
(Mariehamn, Finland; 25 August 1973)
Biggest win
 Sweden 17–0 Azerbaijan 
(Gothenburg, Sweden; 23 June 2010)
Biggest defeat
 Brazil 5–1 Sweden 
(Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 6 August 2016)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1991)
Best resultRunners-up (2003)
European Championship
Appearances10 (first in 1984)
Best resultChampions (1984)

Competitive record

World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 - Germany vs Sweden
Sweden playing against Germany in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Final.
FIFA Women's World Cup record FIFA Women's World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
China 1991 Third place 3rd 6 4 0 2 18 7 6 4 2 0 13 3
Sweden 1995 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 6 4 Qualified as hosts
United States 1999 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 7 6 6 6 0 0 18 5
United States 2003 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 0 2 10 7 6 5 0 1 27 4
China 2007 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 3 4 8 7 1 0 32 6
Germany 2011 Third place 3rd 6 5 0 1 10 6 10 8 2 0 40 6
Canada 2015 Round of 16 16th 4 0 3 1 5 8 10 10 0 0 32 1
France 2019 Third place 3rd 7 5 0 2 12 6 8 7 0 1 22 2
Total Best: Runners-up 8/8 40 23 5 12 71 48 54 47 5 2 184 27

Olympic Games

Futebol feminino olímpico- Brasil e Suécia no Maracanã (29033096025)
Sweden celebrate after the semi final victory against Brazil at the 2016 Summer Olympics.
Olympic Games football tournament record Olympic Games qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
United States 1996 Group stage 6th 3 1 0 2 4 5 4 2 1 1 6 4
Australia 2000 Group stage 6th 3 0 1 2 1 4 10 8 2 0 25 11
Greece 2004 Fourth place 4th 5 2 0 3 4 5 12 9 0 3 37 11
China 2008 Quarter-final 6th 4 2 0 2 4 5 13 10 2 1 42 13
United Kingdom 2012 Quarter-final 7th 4 1 2 1 7 5 16 13 2 1 50 12
Brazil 2016 Runners-up 2nd 6 1 3 2 4 8 17 12 4 1 40 10
Japan 2020 Qualified 5 4 0 1 10 4
France 2024 To be determined
United States 2028
Total Best: Runners-up 6/6 25 7 6 12 24 32 77 58 11 8 210 65

UEFA Women's Euro

Svenska damlandslaget i fotboll 2013
Sweden in the UEFA Women's Euro 2013.
UEFA Women's Euro record UEFA Women's Euro qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1984 Champions 1st 4 3 0 1 6 4 6 6 0 0 26 1
Norway 1987 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 4 6 5 0 1 14 3
West Germany 1989 Third place 3rd 2 1 0 1 3 3 6 2 3 1 11 4
Denmark 1991 Did not qualify 6 4 2 0 13 3
Italy 1993 Did not qualify 6 3 2 1 18 4
Germany 1995 Runners-up 2nd 3 1 0 2 9 8 6 5 0 1 25 2
NorwaySweden 1997 Semi-finals 3rd 4 3 0 1 6 2 6 5 1 0 26 2
Germany 2001 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 0 2 7 4 8 5 2 1 28 10
England 2005 Semi-finals 3rd 4 1 2 1 4 4 8 6 1 1 26 5
Finland 2009 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 7 4 8 8 0 0 31 0
Sweden 2013 Semi-finals 3rd 5 3 1 1 13 3 Qualified as hosts
Netherlands 2017 Quarter-finals 7th 4 1 1 2 4 5 8 7 0 1 22 3
England 2021 To be determined
Total Best: Champions 10/12 37 19 5 13 63 41 74 56 11 7 240 37
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's soccer hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Year Result
Portugal 1994 Third place
Portugal 1995 Champions
Portugal 1996 Runners-up
Portugal 1997 Third place
Portugal 1998 Fourth place
Portugal 1999 Sixth place
Portugal 2000 Fourth place
Portugal 2001 Champions
Portugal 2002 Third place
Portugal 2003 Fifth place
Portugal 2004 Fifth place
Portugal 2005 Fourth place
Portugal 2006 Third place
Portugal 2007 Third place
Portugal 2008 Fifth place
Portugal 2009 Champions
Portugal 2010 Third place
Portugal 2011 Fourth place
Portugal 2012 Fourth place
Portugal 2013 Fourth place
Portugal 2014 Fourth place
Portugal 2015 Fourth place
Portugal 2016 Did not enter
Portugal 2017 Seventh place
Portugal 2018 Champions
Portugal 2019 Fourth place

Titles

Runner-up: 2003
Third place: 1991, 2011, 2019

All-time team record

The following table shows Sweden's all-time international record, from 1973 to 2018.[11]

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD
 Argentina 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Australia 11 7 3 1 22 8 +14
 Azerbaijan 2 2 0 0 20 0 +20
 Belarus 2 2 0 0 12 0 +12
 Belgium 4 4 0 0 13 3 +10
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4
 Brazil 10 3 2 5 9 14 −5
 Canada 21 13 3 5 42 24 +18
 China PR 26 10 9 7 32 24 +8
 Colombia 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Croatia 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2
 Czech Republic 5 4 1 0 8 2 +6
 Czechoslovakia 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1
 Denmark 54 30 12 12 88 51 +37
 England 24 13 8 3 44 20 +24
 Faroe Islands 2 2 0 0 10 0 +10
 Finland 37 30 6 1 118 16 +102
 France 20 11 3 6 39 25 +14
 Germany 27 7 1 19 32 49 −17
 Ghana 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2
 Great Britain 1 0 1 0 0 0 ±0
 Hungary 5 5 0 0 27 1 +21
 Iceland 15 12 1 2 52 10 +42
 Iran 1 1 0 0 7 0 +7
 Italy 22 15 4 3 42 14 +28
 Japan 12 5 3 5 25 13 +12
 Latvia 2 2 0 0 14 0 +14
 Mexico 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3
 Moldova 2 2 0 0 9 0 +9
 Netherlands 21 10 5 6 32 16 +16
 Nigeria 4 2 2 0 9 5 +4
 North Korea 4 4 0 0 5 1 +4
 Northern Ireland 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7
 Norway 53 19 12 22 84 87 −3
 Poland 7 7 0 0 27 1 +26
 Portugal 8 7 0 1 27 6 +21
 Republic of Ireland 6 5 1 0 22 1 +21
 Romania 4 4 0 0 22 0 +22
 Russia 6 6 0 0 14 1 +13
 Scotland 6 6 0 0 17 2 +15
 Serbia and Montenegro 2 2 0 0 9 1 +8
 Slovakia 4 4 0 0 13 1 +12
 South Africa 3 3 0 0 8 1 +9
 South Korea 1 1 0 0 8 0 +8
 Soviet Union 2 2 0 0 6 0 +6
 Spain 10 7 3 0 32 6 +26
  Switzerland 12 11 0 1 40 6 +34
 Ukraine 2 2 0 0 8 2 +6
 United States 39 7 11 21 38 67 −29
 Wales 3 3 0 0 12 1 +11
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Recent schedule and results

2019

Team

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[16]

Caps and goals as of 9 April 2019 after match against  Austria.

Head coach: Peter Gerhardsson

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Hedvig Lindahl 29 April 1983 (age 36) 157 0 Germany VfL Wolfsburg
12 GK Jennifer Falk 26 April 1993 (age 26) 0 0 Sweden Kopparbergs/Göteborg
21 GK Zećira Mušović 26 May 1996 (age 23) 2 0 Sweden Rosengård

2 DF Jonna Andersson 2 January 1993 (age 26) 40 0 England Chelsea
3 DF Linda Sembrant 15 May 1987 (age 32) 109 8 Italy Juventus
4 DF Hanna Glas 17 September 1992 (age 26) 21 0 France Paris Saint-Germain
5 DF Nilla Fischer 2 August 1984 (age 34) 175 23 Sweden Linköping
6 DF Magdalena Eriksson 8 September 1993 (age 25) 48 5 England Chelsea
13 DF Amanda Ilestedt 17 January 1993 (age 26) 25 2 Germany Bayern Munich
15 DF Nathalie Björn 4 May 1997 (age 22) 8 3 Sweden Rosengård

8 MF Lina Hurtig 15 September 1995 (age 23) 17 3 Sweden Linköping
9 FW Kosovare Asllani 29 July 1989 (age 29) 126 32 Spain Tacón
14 MF Julia Roddar 16 February 1992 (age 27) 6 0 Sweden Kopparbergs/Göteborg
17 MF Caroline Seger (captain) 19 March 1985 (age 34) 193 27 Sweden Rosengård
19 MF Anna Anvegård 10 May 1997 (age 22) 8 1 Sweden Växjö DFF
23 MF Elin Rubensson 11 May 1993 (age 26) 62 2 Sweden Kopparbergs/Göteborg

7 FW Madelen Janogy 12 November 1995 (age 23) 3 0 Sweden Piteå
10 FW Sofia Jakobsson 23 April 1990 (age 29) 100 17 France Montpellier
11 FW Stina Blackstenius 5 February 1996 (age 23) 43 10 Sweden Linköping
16 FW Julia Zigiotti Olme 24 December 1997 (age 21) 6 0 Sweden Kopparbergs/Göteborg
18 FW Fridolina Rolfö 24 November 1993 (age 25) 34 8 Germany VfL Wolfsburg
20 FW Mimmi Larsson 9 April 1994 (age 25) 20 6 Sweden Linköping
22 FW Olivia Schough 11 March 1991 (age 28) 72 9 Sweden Djurgårdens IF

Recent call-ups

The following players have been named to a squad in the last 12 months.

This list may be incomplete, and caps and goals may be incorrect.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Cajsa Andersson 19 January 1993 (age 26) 0 0 Sweden Piteå v.  England, 11 November 2018

DF Mia Carlsson 12 March 1990 (age 29) 9 0 Sweden Kristianstad v.  England, 11 November 2018
DF Jessica Samuelsson 30 January 1992 (age 27) 55 0 Sweden Rosengard v.  England, 11 November 2018

MF Hanna Folkesson 15 June 1988 (age 31) 48 1 Sweden Djurgårdens IF v.  England, 11 November 2018
MF Julia Spetsmark 30 June 1989 (age 30) 4 0 United States North Carolina Courage v.  England, 11 November 2018

FW Julia Karlenäs 6 October 1993 (age 25) 2 0 Sweden Piteå v.  England, 11 November 2018

Most capped players

# Name Sweden career Caps
1 Therese Sjögran 1997–2015 214
2 Caroline Seger 2005–present 195
3 Lotta Schelin 2004–2017 185
4 Victoria Svensson 1996–2009 166
5 Nilla Fischer 2001–present 165
6 Kristin Bengtsson 1991–2005 157
7 Hedvig Lindahl 2002–present 152
8 Malin Andersson 1994–2005 151
9 Pia Sundhage 1975–1996 146
10 Lisa Dahlkvist 2008–present 134
*Active players in bold, statistics as of 24 October 2018.[17]

Top goalscorers

# Player Sweden career Goals Caps Goals per game
1 Lotta Schelin 2004–2017 88 185 0.47
2 Hanna Ljungberg 1996–2008 72 130 0.55
3 Lena Videkull 1984–1996 71 111 0.64
4 Pia Sundhage 1975–1996 71 146 0.49
5 Victoria Svensson 1996–2009 68 166 0.40
6 Malin Andersson 1994–2005 38 151 0.25
7 Anneli Andelén 1985–1995 37 88 0.42
8 Kosovare Asllani 2008–present 31 120 0.26
9 Caroline Seger 2005–present 26 186 0.14
10 Helen Johansson 1981–1995 23 88 0.26

Coaches

Name P W D L GF GA Debut Last match
Christer Molander 1 0 1 0 0 0 25 August 1973 25 August 1973
Hasse Karlsson 12 7 1 4 19 10 26 July 1974 2 October 1976
Tord Grip 7 6 1 0 17 3 18 June 1977 21 October 1978
Ulf Bergquist 7 3 3 1 10 4 5 July 1979 27 July 1979
Ulf Lyfors 51 34 11 6 135 39 28 June 1980 30 September 1987
Gunilla Paijkull 43 30 6 7 100 30 27 April 1988 29 November 1991
Bengt Simonsson 60 37 6 17 153 69 8 March 1992 31 August 1996
Marika Domanski-Lyfors 135 71 26 38 277 142 9 October 1996 16 June 2005
Thomas Dennerby 113 68 18 27 240 112 28 August 2005 15 September 2012
Pia Sundhage 81 43 18 20 156 72 23 October 2012 29 July 2017
Peter Gerhardsson 15 11 2 2 34 6 19 September 2017 -
Total 525 310 93 122 1,141 487 - -
*Statistics as of 24 October 2018.[18]

References

  1. ^ Sjögran Caps and goals
  2. ^ Schelin Caps and goals
  3. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  4. ^ "Förlust i Örebro mot Tyskland". Swedish Football Association (in Swedish). 29 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  5. ^ Mats Bråstedt. "'SOK lovar damerna en storsatsning'". Expressen.se. Retrieved 26 October 2007.
  6. ^ Algarve Cup
  7. ^ Nordic Women's Championships 1974–1982 rsssf.com/ Retrieved 09–03–13.
  8. ^ Cyprus Tournament (Women) 1990–1993 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  9. ^ North America Cup 1987 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  10. ^ Australia Cup 1999–2004 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  11. ^ "Sveriges motståndare 1973–2016" (in Swedish). SvFF.
  12. ^ "Finale Algarve Cup tussen Oranjevrouwen en Zweden afgelast" (in Dutch). nu.nl. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  13. ^ @Algarve_Cup (7 March 2018). "UPDATE: The match between the Netherlands and Sweden has been cancelled due to heavy rain. As a result, both teams will be awarded 1st place" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  14. ^ "Finale Algarve Cup tussen Oranjevrouwen en Zweden afgelast" (in Dutch). nu.nl. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  15. ^ @Algarve_Cup (7 March 2018). "UPDATE: The match between the Netherlands and Sweden has been cancelled due to heavy rain. As a result, both teams will be awarded 1st place" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  16. ^ https://www.svenskfotboll.se/nyheter/landslag/2019/5/dam-vm-trupp/
  17. ^ Sweden – Caps and Goals
  18. ^ Sweden – Förbundskapten

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
European Champions
1984 (First title)
Succeeded by
1987 Norway 
Anneli Olsson

Anneli Olsson (born 7 February 1967) is a Swedish footballer who played as a midfielder for the Sweden women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she played for Hammarby IF in Sweden.

Gamla Ullevi

Gamla Ullevi (Swedish pronunciation: [²ɡamːla ²ɵlːɛˌviː]) is a football stadium in Gothenburg, Sweden, that opened on 5 April 2009. The stadium replaced the city's previous main football stadium, also called Gamla Ullevi, and is the home ground of GAIS, IFK Göteborg and Örgryte IS. It is also the national stadium for the Sweden women's national football team. The new stadium was built on the ground of the now-demolished old stadium. The construction of the stadium was surrounded by controversy, regarding the cost of the project, the alleged low standard of the finished stadium, as well as its name.

The first competitive match at the stadium on 5 April 2009 was also a derby between Örgryte IS and GAIS, attracting 17,531 spectators. The current attendance record of 18,276 was, however, set about a week later when IFK Göteborg played their first game at Gamla Ullevi against Djurgårdens IF.

Gunilla Paijkull

Gunilla Elisabeth Paijkull (born 5 September 1943) is a Swedish football coach and former player. She was head coach of the Sweden women's national football team at the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Paijkull, previously Gunilla Karlsson, was a football player with the Stockholm club AIK. In 1971 she was one of three AIK players called–up for an unofficial Sweden team's friendly match against Denmark in Copenhagen.She began playing with Hammarby IF DFF in 1973 and was appointed head coach of the team in 1978.Paijkull took over as Sweden women's national team coach in 1988, ahead of the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament in which Sweden finished runners–up to Norway. She was the first woman to coach a national football team. At the inaugural 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup in China, Paijkull, the only female coach among the 12 finalists, guided Sweden to a third–place finish.After leaving her position as national team coach Paijkull became a FIFA instructor. She served on FIFA's technical study group at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, as well as at the 1995 and 1999 editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup.

Paijkull is of Estonian heritage. In 2013, she was serving on the board of Tyresö FF.

Hans Karlsson (footballer)

Hans "Hasse" Karlsson (1 September 1932 – 2008) was a Swedish footballer. He made 119 Allsvenskan appearances for Djurgårdens IF and scored 29 goals. A former manager of the Sweden women's national football team, he died in 2008.

Hedvig Lindahl

Rut Hedvig Lindahl (born 29 April 1983) is a Swedish professional football goalkeeper who plays for Wolfsburg in the Bundesliga. She previously played club football in Sweden for Damallsvenskan clubs including Malmö FF, Linköpings FC, Kristianstads DFF and Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC as well as Chelsea in the English FA WSL. Since making her international debut in 2002, Lindahl has accrued over 115 caps for the Sweden women's national football team. On 3 August 2014 Lindahl played her 100th cap for Sweden women's national football team against England. On 17 September 2015 Lindahl played her 113th cap and thereby broke Elisabeth Leidinge's record to become the most capped Swedish female goalkeeper. She has kept goal for Sweden at the UEFA Women's Championship, the FIFA Women's World Cup and the Olympic Games. Lindahl was the Swedish women's goalkeeper of the year in 2004, 2005, 2009, 2014 and 2015. She won the 2015 Diamantbollen, after being one of three nominations for Damallsvenskan's Most Valuable Player in 2014. In 2016, Lindahl was one of 5 nominees for Women's PFA Players' Player of the Year and was also picked for the WSL Team of the Year.

Jonna Andersson

Jonna Ann-Charlotte Andersson (born 2 January 1993) is a Swedish football defender who plays for English club Chelsea and the Sweden women's national football team.

Malin Gustafsson

Malin Gustafsson (born 24 January 1980) is a Swedish women's international footballer who plays as a forward. She is a member of the Sweden women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Marika Domanski-Lyfors

Marika Susan Domanski-Lyfors (born 17 May 1960), née Marika Susan Domanski, is a Swedish football coach and former player. She was head coach of the Sweden women's national football team from September 1996 until June 2005 and also coached the China women's national football team during 2007. She is nicknamed Mackan.

As a Jitex BK player Domanski-Lyfors won two League Championships (1981 and 1984) and three Swedish Cups (1981, 1982 and 1984). All of Jitex's regular players except left-back Domanski-Lyfors were capped at international level, because national team coach Ulf Lyfors did not rate her as a player. Marika disputed Ulf's judgement, but forgave him to the extent that the two were later married and had son Joakim.Her own nine-year spell in charge of the senior Sweden women's national football team was considered a success. The team were runners-up in UEFA Women's Euro 2001 and the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, beaten by Germany in the final of both competitions.After returning to a role with the Sweden women's national under-21 team, Domanski-Lyfors accepted an offer to become head coach of the China women's national football team in March 2007. She oversaw an improvement in the team's results and guided the hosts to the quarter finals of the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.At the tournament, the Chinese hosts engaged in surveillance and intimidation of first round opponents Denmark. Domanski-Lyfors and her assistant Pia Sundhage were unaware of the incidents and Danish coach Kenneth Heiner-Møller absolved them of any blame, although he refused to shake hands after the match.The Chinese wanted Domanski-Lyfors to stay on for the 2008 Olympics, but she decided against extending her contract. In November 2007 she was appointed a technical director of the Swedish Football Association (SvFF).Marika Domanski-Lyfors can be seen in the 2013 Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport.

During her first international game as Swedish head coach, Sweden won against Italy, 1–0, in Torino on 9 October 1996.

Minna Heponiemi

Minna Heponiemi (born 10 August 1977) was a Swedish women's international footballer who played as a midfielder. She was a member of the Sweden women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Peter Gerhardsson

Peter Gerhardsson (born 22 August 1959) is a Swedish football manager and former football player. He was previously the manager of BK Häcken. Before the start of the 2013 Allsvenskan he was ranked as the best manager in the league by newspaper Aftonbladet.On 29 November 2016 it was announced that he'll take over as manager of the Swedish women's national team after Pia Sundhage following the 2017 European Championship.

Pia Sundhage

Pia Mariane Sundhage (Swedish pronunciation: [²piːa ²sɵnːdˌhɑːɡɛ]; born 13 February 1960) is a Swedish former professional football player who played most of her career as a forward, but had stints as a midfielder as well as a sweeper. Sundhage was the head coach of the United States women's national team from 2008 to 2012; during which her team won two Olympic gold medals and finished second at the World Cup. Sundhage was the 2012 FIFA World Coach of the Year. She became head coach of the Sweden women's national football team on 1 December 2012. Sundhage can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013. Sundhage stepped down from coaching the Sweden women's national team in August 2017, and subsequently became the coach of the Sweden women's under-17 national team in January 2018.

Sara Call

Sara Call (born (1977-07-16)16 July 1977) is a Swedish former football defender who played for the Sweden women's national football team. She represented Sweden at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification at the 2000 Summer Olympics.

Sara Larsson

Sara Margareta Larsson (born 13 May 1979) is a Swedish former football defender who played for KIF Örebro DFF of the Damallsvenskan league. She won 112 caps as a member of the Sweden women's national football team.

Stadsparksvallen

Stadsparksvallen (popularly called Vallen) is a classic sports facility located in Jönköping, Sweden.

Stadsparksvallen was inaugurated in 1902 and is located in Jönköping's town park. Vallen functions as the football club Jönköpings Södra IF's home arena (IK Tord also plays here), but as late as 1981 it was used for track and field events. Jönköpings Södra IF has played 10 seasons in the Swedish Allsvenskan in Stadsparksvallen. Sweden women's national football team has played thrice at the venue, first time in 1985 against Belgium.During the Swedish Sports Confederation's 100th anniversary in 2003, Stadsparksvallen was designated as one of the 100 sports historic places in Sweden.

Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Sweden women's national football team has represented Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. There were runners up once. and three times bronze medalists: in 1991, in 2011 and in 2019.

Sweden women's national under-17 football team

Sweden women's national under-17 football team is the football team representing Sweden in competitions for under-17 year old players and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The team has never qualified for the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

Sweden women's national under-19 football team

Sweden women's national under-19 football team is the football team representing Sweden in competitions for under-19 year old players and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. Their best achievement is winning the 1999, 2012 and 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship.

Thomas Dennerby

Thomas Dennerby (born 13 August 1959 in Enskede) is a Swedish football coach.

Tord Grip

Tord Grip (born 13 January 1938) is a retired Swedish football coach and manager. He has worked with several national teams, including England, Sweden, Indonesia, Mexico, the Ivory Coast and Kosovo.

FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
China 1991 Group stage 17 November  United States L 2–3 Ying Dong Stadium, Panyu
19 November  Japan W 8–0 New Plaza Stadium, Foshan
21 November  Brazil W 2–0 Ying Dong Stadium, Panyu
Quarter-finals 24 November  China PR W 1–0 Tianhe Stadium, Guangzhou
Semi-finals 27 November  Norway L 1–4 Ying Dong Stadium, Panyu
Third place play-off 29 November  Germany W 4–0 Guangdong Provincial Stadium, Guangzhou
Sweden 1995 Group stage 5 June  Brazil L 0–1 Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
7 June  Germany W 3–2
9 June  Japan W 2–0 Arosvallen, Västerås
Quarter-finals 13 June  China PR D 1–1 (4–3 p) Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
United States 1999 Group stage 19 June  China PR L 1–2 Spartan Stadium, San Jose
23 June  Australia W 3–1 Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
26 June  Ghana W 2–0 Soldier Field, Chicago
Quarter-finals 30 June  Norway L 1–3 Spartan Stadium, San Jose
United States 2003 Group stage 21 September  United States L 1–3 RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C.
25 September  North Korea W 1–0 Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
28 September  Nigeria W 3–0 Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
Quarter-finals 1 October  Brazil W 2–1 Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
Semi-finals 5 October  Canada W 2–1 PGE Park, Portland
Final 12 October  Germany L 1–2 (aet) The Home Depot Center, Carson
China 2007 Group stage 11 September  Nigeria D 1–1 Chengdu Sports Center, Chengdu
14 September  United States L 0–2
18 September  North Korea W 2–1 Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium, Tianjin
Germany 2011 Group stage 28 June  Colombia W 1–0 BayArena, Leverkusen
2 July  North Korea W 1–0 Impuls Arena, Augsburg
6 July  United States W 2–1 Volkswagen-Arena, Wolfsburg
Quarter-finals 10 July  Australia W 3–1 Impuls Arena, Augsburg
Semi-finals 13 July  Japan L 1–3 Commerzbank-Arena, Frankfurt
Third place play-off 16 July  France W 2–1 Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim
Canada 2015 Group stage 8 June  Nigeria D 3–3 Winnipeg Stadium, Winnipeg
12 June  United States D 0–0
16 June  Australia D 1–1 Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton
Round of 16 20 June  Germany L 1–4 TD Place, Ottawa
France 2019 Group stage 11 June  Chile W 2–0 Roazhon Park, Rennes
16 June  Thailand W 5–1 Allianz Riviera, Nice
20 June  United States L 0–2 Stade Océane, Le Havre
Round of 16 24 June  Canada W 1–0 Parc des Princes, Paris
Quarter-finals 29 June  Germany W 2–1 Roazhon Park, Rennes
Semi-finals 3 July  Netherlands L 0–1 (aet) Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Décines-Charpieu
Third place play-off 6 July  England W 2–1 Allianz Riviera, Nice
21 January 2018 FriendlySouth Africa 0–3 SwedenCape Town, South Africa
Report Mbane Goal 10' (o.g.)
Kullashi Goal 47'69'
Stadium: Green Point Stadium
Referee: Nteboheleng Setoko (Lesotho)
28 February 2018 2018 Algarve Cup GSCanada 1–3 SwedenParchal, Portugal
19:00 WET
Report
Stadium: Bela Vista Municipal Stadium
Referee: Ledya Tafesse (Ethiopia)
2 March 2018 2018 Algarve Cup GSSweden 1–1 South KoreaParchal, Portugal
19:00 WET Report
Stadium: Bela Vista Municipal Stadium
Referee: Salima Mukansanga (Rwanda)
5 March 2018 2018 Algarve Cup GSSweden 3–0 RussiaParchal, Portugal
15:00 WET
Report Stadium: Bela Vista Municipal Stadium
Referee: Marianela Araya (Costa Rica)
7 March 2018 2018 Algarve Cup FinalNetherlands Cancelled[12][13] SwedenParchal, Portugal
18:30 WET Report Stadium: Bela Vista Municipal Stadium
Note: The final game was called off due to heavy rain and adverse weather conditions, as a result, the Algarve Cup was awarded to both teams.[14][15]
5 April 2018 2019 FIFA WWC qualifyingHungary 1–4 SwedenSzombathely, Hungary
18:00 CEST
Report
Stadium: Haladás Sportkomplexum
Referee: Viola Raudziņa (Latvia)
7 June 2018 2019 FIFA WWC qualifyingSweden 4–0 CroatiaGothenburg, Sweden
18:45
Stadium: Gamla Ullevi
Attendance: 8,092
Referee: Marta Frias Acedo (Spain)
12 June 2018 2019 FIFA WWC qualifyingUkraine 1–0 SwedenLviv, Ukraine
18:00 Stadium: Arena Lviv
Attendance: 1,257
30 August 2018 2019 FIFA WWC qualifyingSweden 3–0 UkraineGothenburg, Sweden
18:45
Stadium: Gamla Ullevi
Referee: Monika Mularczyk (Poland)
4 September 2018 2019 FIFA WWC qualifyingDenmark 0–1 SwedenViborg, Denmark
17:00
Stadium: Viborg Stadium
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
4 October 2018 FriendlySweden 2–1 NorwayHelsingborg, Sweden
18:45
Stadium: Olympia
Attendance: 2,639
9 October 2018 FriendlyItaly 1–0 SwedenCremona, Italy
Stadium: Stadio Giovanni Zini
Attendance: 2,000
Referee: Tanja Subotic (Slovenia)
11 November 2018 FriendlyEngland 0–2 SwedenRotherham, England
13:30
Stadium: New York Stadium
Attendance: 9,561
Referee: Petra Pavlikova (Slovakia)
22 January 2019 FriendlySouth Africa 0–0 SwedenCape Town, South Africa
Report Stadium: Cape Town Stadium
Attendance: 5 057
27 February 2019 2019 Algarve CupSweden 4–1  SwitzerlandAlgarve, Portugal
Report Stadium: Estádio Algarve
Referee: Laura Fortunato (Argentina)
1 March 2019 2019 Algarve CupPortugal 2–1 SwedenAlbufeira, Portugal
Report Björn Goal 68' Stadium: Albufeira Municipal Stadium
Referee: María Belén Carvajal (Chile)
6 March 2019 2019 Algarve CupCanada 0–0
(6–5 p)
 SwedenAlgarve, Portugal
Report Stadium: Estádio Algarve
Penalties
6 April 2019 FriendlySweden 1–2 GermanySolna, Sweden
Report
Stadium: Friends Arena
Attendance: 25,882
9 April 2019 FriendlyAustria 0–2 SwedenMaria Enzersdorf, Austria
Report
Stadium: BSFZ-Arena
31 May 2019 FriendlySweden 1–0 South KoreaGothenburg, Sweden
Report Stadium: Gamla Ullevi
Referee: Florence Guillemin
11 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupChile 0–2 SwedenRennes, France
18:00 Report
Stadium: Roazhon Park
Attendance: 15,875
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)
16 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupSweden 5–1 ThailandNice, France
18:00
Report
Stadium: Allianz Riviera
Attendance: 9,354
Referee: Salima Mukansanga (Rwanda)
20 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupSweden 0–2 United StatesLe Havre, France
21:00 Report
Stadium: Stade Océane
Attendance: 22,418
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
24 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupSweden 1–0 CanadaParis, France
21:00 Report Stadium: Parc des Princes
Attendance: 38,078
Referee: Kate Jacewicz (Australia)
29 June 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupGermany 1–2 SwedenRennes, France
18:30
Report
Stadium: Roazhon Park
Attendance: 25,301
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
3 July 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupNetherlands 1–0 (a.e.t.) SwedenDécines-Charpieu, France
21:00
Report Stadium: Parc Olympique Lyonnais
Attendance: 48,452
Referee: Marie-Soleil Beaudoin (Canada)
6 July 2019 2019 FIFA Women's World CupEngland 1–2 SwedenNice, France
17:00 CEST
Report
Stadium: Allianz Riviera
Attendance: 20,316
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
Sweden women's national football team
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