Suzy Kolber

Suzanne Lisa "Suzy" Kolber (/ˈkoʊlbər/; born May 14, 1964) is an American football sideline reporter, co-producer, and sportscaster for ESPN. She was one of the original anchors of ESPN2 when it launched in 1993. Three years later, she left ESPN2 to join Fox Sports, and rejoined ESPN in late 1999.

Suzy Kolber
Suzy Kolber
Kolber at FedExField in September 2016
BornMay 14, 1964 (age 55)
Alma materUniversity of Miami
OccupationAnchor, Reporter
Children1

Biography

Early life

Kolber was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to a Jewish family.[1] She went to Sandy Run Middle School in Dresher, Pennsylvania, and is a 1982 graduate of Pennsylvania's Upper Dublin High School. She graduated from the University of Miami in 1986.[2][3]

Career before ESPN

Kolber graduated from the University of Miami in 1986 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in telecommunications. While an undergraduate, she worked at Dynamic Cable in Coral Gables, Florida, as a sports director (1984–86) and was on the UM Water Ski team. After graduation, she worked at CBS Sports in New York City as a videotape coordinator (1986).

From 1985 to 1989, Kolber produced the 5:30 p.m. ET sportscast at WTVJ-TV in Miami, winning a local Sports Emmy in 1988. From 1989–90, she freelanced as a specials producer for WPLG-TV in Miami. In addition, she produced two magazine shows, Greyhound Racing America in Miami, Florida (1988–90) and Cowboys Special Edition in Irving, Texas (1990–91). In 1991, Kolber's freelance assignments included work as a reporter/producer for Breeders' Cup Newsfeed in Greenwich, Connecticut; a field producer for Inside Edition in New York City; a sports specials producer for WCIX-TV in Miami, and a producer/director for NFL Films. She was a weekend sports anchor and weekday feature reporter at WPEC-TV in West Palm Beach, Florida from December 1991 until she moved to ESPN in 1993.

ESPN

Suzy Kolber has covered a variety of assignments for ESPN from the National Football League to the 1996 ESPN X Games bicycle-stunt events and Grand Slam tennis events. She is most recognized as a sideline reporter on ESPN’s Monday Night Football with Michele Tafoya. In 2007, she was also a host for ESPN’s pre-race NASCAR Countdown program.

Kolber joined ESPN’s MNF team during its inaugural year in 2006 after five previous seasons on ESPN's Sunday Night Football (200105). As a member of the MNF team, Kolber helped the longtime franchise became the most-watched program in cable television history.

Kolber worked the ABC Sports broadcast of Super Bowl XL in Detroit in 2006 with Michele Tafoya and contributed to the network’s pre-game show. She also became the first female recipient of the Maxwell Club Sports Broadcaster of the Year Award in 2006 and was named to Sports Business Daily’s 2004 list of the 10 favorite sports TV personalities of the past 10 years.

Kolber regularly hosts ESPN’s year-round NFL Live news and information show, and she has played a major role in ESPN’s comprehensive coverage of the annual NFL Draft, hosting the Day 2 telecast (2004–2006) and leading analysis segments on Day 1. For the 1999 through 2003 NFL seasons, Kolber was the host of NFL Matchup. She also previously contributed “Backstage” segments to Monday Night Countdown.

During the NFL off-season, Kolber serves as an anchor on SportsCenter and as an on-site and studio host for ESPN’s tennis coverage at the French Open (since 20042006) and Wimbledon (since 20032006/2009). In 1996, 2000 and 2001, she hosted the Summer X Games and Winter X Games, and she co-hosted the event again in Aspen in 2006. She also hosted horse racing events including all three legs of the Triple Crown for ESPN/ESPN2 studio programs.

Kolber returned to ESPN in August 1999 after originally joining the network in 1993 as co-host for ESPN2’s SportsNight, when the network debuted October 1 of that year. She later served as an anchor on SportsCenter, a reporter on College GameDay and co-host of the X Games in 1995 and 1996. Kolber also hosted ESPN2's SportsFigures, which uses sports celebrities and analogies to teach math and physics.[3]

While covering the 2011 NFL Draft, Kolber came under fire for her interview with Mark Ingram Jr., who started to sob when Kolber read an e-mail from Ingram's imprisoned father. The interview was perceived by some as being manipulative.[4][5]

On Tuesday, September 13, 2011, the ESPN2 debut of the show NFL32 with Suzy Kolber and Chris Mortensen hit the air. With a backdrop similar to a sports bar (complete with wainscoting, sports memorabilia, and dark woodwork), the show focuses on "dissect the biggest topics of the day from all 32 NFL teams"[6] and attributes much of its design to that of the Dan Patrick Show, a well listened to and watched national radio and television show on DirecTV's Audience network.

The Namath incident

On December 20, 2003, Kolber received national attention when, covering a New York Jets game, former Jets quarterback Joe Namath twice stated, in a nationally televised sideline interview with Kolber, that he wanted to kiss her, and "couldn't care less about the team strugg-a-ling." Kolber responded, "Thanks, Joe. I'll take that as a huge compliment."[7] Namath later apologized and blamed the incident on his obvious intoxication. Soon after, Namath entered an outpatient alcoholism treatment program. Namath chronicled the episode, including his battle with alcoholism in his book, Namath.[8]

Monday Night Football

Kolber joined ESPN's Monday Night Football crew as a sideline reporter along with Michele Tafoya when the network took over the longtime football series from ABC Sports in 2006. After Tafoya left ESPN for NBC Sports at the end of the 2010–2011 NFL season, ESPN used a rotating solo sideline reporter for the 2011–2012 NFL season, with reporters such as Wendi Nix, Ed Werder and Rachel Nichols stepping into the role each week, with Kolber as a fill-in. Kolber requested to do more in-studio work so she didn't have to be away from her child. The show NFL32 (now NFL Insiders) was created as a result of this request. Lisa Salters was named the new full-time solo sideline reporter for Monday Night Football starting with the 2012–2013 NFL season, effectively ending Kolber's tenure as sideline reporter for the show, although both Salters and Kolber continue to co-produce the show in some capacity.

NASCAR Countdown

In the two weeks prior to Kolber's arrival, Brent Musburger was mysteriously absent from his position as lead host of NASCAR Countdown on the ABC/ESPN network. On the week of the race on May 19, ESPN gave no reason for his absence but announced Kolber as the new host of Nextel Cup and Busch Series studio programming. She was subsequently replaced by Allen Bestwick as host of NASCAR Countdown.

Monday Night Countdown

After substituting for the then-ailing Stuart Scott during most of the 2014 NFL season, Kolber took over Scott's role permanently as an on-site host of Monday Night Countdown, starting with the 2015 NFL season, after Scott died on January 4, 2015.

Fox Sports

Kolber left ESPN for Fox Sports in November 1996, where she anchored Fox Sports News for the fledgling Fox Sports Net and reported from NFL games, among other duties. She served as the lead reporter for the network's coverage of the NFL on Fox teaming up with the network's No. 1 announcer team of Pat Summerall and John Madden for one game in 1998. She also covered horse racing. She served as studio host for the network's coverage of the NHL on Fox, including both the 1999 Stanley Cup Finals and the Playoffs. In March 1999, Kolber co-hosted a Fox non-sports presentation with Maury Povich, Opening the Lost Tombs: Live From Egypt, an archaeological event that promised to "unveil five-thousand year old mysteries." Fox's TV cameras showed the first live excavation on Egypt's ancient Giza plateau; Kolber reported live from the tomb. She returned to ESPN in August 1999.

Endorsements

Kolber's football broadcast narrative is featured on Sega's video game, ESPN NFL Football for Microsoft's Xbox and Sony's PlayStation 2.

Kolber also is a national television spokesperson for Chevrolet and Pepsi-Cola commercials.

In 1995's ESPN Extreme Games for PlayStation, she has multiple video sequences hyping up the player, introducing levels, and hinting at secret areas. The re-release of the game, 1eXtreme, removed all of her videos, and any reference to ESPN.

References

  1. ^ Charry, Rob. "Sideline Star". The Forward (March 24, 2006).
  2. ^ Makhnovetsky, Alina. "ESPN's Suzy Kolber: Game Day Girl". Suburban Life Magazine (February 2010).
  3. ^ a b "Suzy Kolber". ESPN Media Zone Bio.
  4. ^ Smith, Michael David (2 May 2011). "After making Mark Ingram cry, Suzy Kolber takes some criticism". ProFootballTalk. WordPress.com VIP. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  5. ^ Petchesky, Barry (2 May 2011). "How ESPN Engineered Mark Ingram's Magic Moment". Deadspin. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  6. ^ "ESPN, NFL agree to eight-year deal". ESPN. 8 September 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2011.
  7. ^ Griffith, Bill (December 23, 2003). "Namath Incident Not Being Kissed Off". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  8. ^ Kriegel, Mark (2004). Namath: A Biography. New York: Viking. ISBN 0-670-03329-4.

External links

ESPN NFL 2K5

ESPN NFL 2K5 is an American football video game developed by Visual Concepts and published by 2K Sports and the Sega Corporation. It is the sixth installment of the NFL 2K series. The game was originally released on July 20, 2004, for both the PlayStation 2 and Xbox video game consoles. It was the last NFL 2K game to be released before Electronic Arts signed an exclusivity deal with the NFL to make 2K's rival Madden NFL series the only officially licensed NFL game and was also the last game still being developed by Sega.

ESPN Sunday Night Football

ESPN Sunday Night Football was the ESPN cable network's weekly television broadcasts of Sunday evening National Football League (NFL) games. The first ESPN Sunday night broadcast occurred on November 8, 1987, while the last one aired on January 1, 2006.

Former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue credits ESPN with raising the "profile" of the league, by turning "a potential six- or seven-hour television experience into a twelve-hour television experience," factoring in both Sunday Night Football and the network's pregame show Sunday NFL Countdown.

KSK

KSK may refer to:

Kagyu Shenpen Kunchab, a Tibetan Buddhist temple in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Kala Shah Kaku, a town in Sheikhupura, Punjab, Pakistan

Karşıyaka S.K., a sports club from Izmir, Turkey

Key Signing Key, in the Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC)

Khao Sam Kaeo, a center of metal production and transshipment on the Kra Isthmus in the mid-to-late 1st millennium BCE

Kill Switch...Klick, an American industrial band

Kissing Suzy Kolber, a sports blog

Kreissparkasse - a savings bank in Germany

Kommando Spezialkräfte, part of Germany's Special Forces

K. S. Krishnan, Indian scientist

Kissing Suzy Kolber

Kissing Suzy Kolber was an NFL-related humor blog run by a group of unsanctioned sports bloggers. The site began in June 2006 when the founders came together as like-minded commenters from the sports blog Deadspin. In 2006, 2007, and 2008, the site won the Weblog Award for Best Sports Blog.

Kolber

Kolber may refer to:

Kolber (company), Swiss watchmaking company

Leo Kolber (born 1929), Canadian businessman

Suzy Kolber (born 1964), American sportscaster

Kolbar workers in Kurdistan

List of ESPN personalities

Present television personalities on the ESPN network.

List of Fox Sports announcers

This is a list of commentators who currently work or have worked for Fox Sports.

List of Monday Night Football commentators

The following is a list of sportscasters who have served as commentators for Monday Night Football broadcasts on various networks, along with each commentator's period of tenure on the show (beginning years of each season shown, as the NFL season ends in the calendar year after it begins). Game announcers used in #2 games usually come from ESPN and are included for both wild card playoff games (1995–2005 except 2002–2003 season) and secondary regular season games (1987, 1997, 2005–present).

List of NFL draft broadcasters

The following is a list of broadcasters of the NFL draft.

List of Outback Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Outback Bowl throughout the years.

List of Pro Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast the National Football League's Pro Bowl throughout the years.

Monday Night Countdown

ESPN Monday Night Countdown, which debuted in 1993 on ESPN, is a television program featuring analysis and news on that night's NFL game to be broadcast on ESPN. The show was originally titled NFL Prime Monday from 1993-97 before it was renamed Monday Night Countdown in 1998. The official name of the show is Monday Night Countdown served by Applebee's. The show's previous sponsor was UPS.

When it debuted, it was one of the first cross-pollinations between ESPN and ABC Sports, which each largely operated under separate management at the time.

NFL 2K

NFL 2K is an American football video game series developed by Visual Concepts and published by Sega. The series was originally exclusive to Sega's Dreamcast video game console due to the absence of EA Sports's Madden NFL series on the system. As the foremost "2K" title, it marked the beginning of a running athletics series that eventually led to the spinning off of 2K's sports publishing business under the name of 2K Sports. Upon the Dreamcast's discontinuation, the series continued to be published for other sixth generation game systems and became the chief competitor of the Madden series.

After the competitively priced NFL 2K5 significantly reduced sales of that year's Madden release, EA signed an exclusivity deal with the NFL that made Madden NFL the only series allowed to use NFL team and player names. After losing the NFL license, Visual Concepts made a brief return to developing football games with the release of All-Pro Football 2K8, which featured former NFL players on fictional teams.

NFL Insiders

NFL Insiders is a National Football League studio show, currently airing Monday through Friday at 3:00 p.m. ET on ESPN. The football-themed show replaced NFL 32 on August 5, 2013. the program is one of the only NFL-related studio programs to air during the week along with NFL Live. On September 13, 2015, a new Sunday edition of NFL Insiders began airing on Sundays at 10:00 a.m. ET, replacing the first hour of Sunday NFL Countdown (which itself was shortened from 3 hours to 2 hours before it became a 3-hour show once again in 2017).

NFL Matchup

NFL Matchup is a National Football League (NFL) preview show that airs every week during the regular season and playoffs. In 2006, the official name was State Farm NFL Matchup; it has also been known as the "Edge NFL Matchup" or other variations based on the current sponsor. As of 2017 it is known simply as the "ESPN NFL Matchup", and it is produced by NFL Films.

During 2008-2009 NFL season, it aired every Sunday during the season on ESPN at 3:00am ET, then re-aired at 7:30am ET. As of 2017, it is aired on ESPN2 at 8:30AM ET on Saturday, then re-aired on Sundays at 4:00AM ET and 6:30AM ET on ESPN. For the 2018 season, it is shown on ESPN2 on Saturdays at 1:00AM, and still re-aired on ESPN at 4:00AM and 6:30AM on Sundays. Additional special airtimes take place during the playoffs and for other specially scheduled NFL games.

PFT Commenter

PFT Commenter (alternatively spelled PFTCommenter or Pro Football Talk Commenter), is a fictional character portrayed by Eric Sollenberger who is a sportswriter who covers the National Football League and US politics for online publication Barstool Sports. He has previously been published on other sports sites including Kissing Suzy Kolber, SBNation, Football Savages, as well as his own site, StrongTakes.com. PFT Commenter, whose name references Profootballtalk.com, mimics the "macho posturing and racism," or "hot takes," in the website's comment sections. PFT Commenter is currently the co-host of the Barstool Sports podcast, Pardon My Take.

Sal Paolantonio

Salvatore Anthony Nicholas Paolantonio (born June 13, 1956 in Long Island, New York) is a Philadelphia-based bureau reporter for ESPN. . Since joining ESPN in 1995, Paolantonio has become a staple in their NFL coverage, as he contributes to shows such as SportsCenter, NFL Live, Sunday NFL Countdown (from a game site) and Monday Night Countdown (from the Monday Night Football site). In 2004, he added studio work to his duties, replacing Suzy Kolber as the host of NFL Matchup, an X's and O's football show; joining him are Louis Riddick and Greg Cosell. His best known work for ESPN was his coverage of the Terrell Owens saga with the Philadelphia Eagles during the 2004 and 2005 seasons. Sal has also been an adjunct professor at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia since 2001.

In 2007, he and fellow sports journalist Reuben Frank put out The Paolantonio Report: The Most Overrated and Underrated Players, Teams, Coaches, and Moments in NFL History. It has been the best-selling NFL book in the country (October 11, 2007) according to Amazon.com. He went on to make the provocative claim in his 2008 folk history, How Football Explains America, that the competition informed the public morality on integration and consciously developed in the mid-20th century into an almost mythic spectacle. With its origins in the closing of the Turnerian frontier, the NFL league, rather than baseball, apparently broke down the color barrier in sports.

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