Surtees

The Surtees Racing Organisation was a race team that spent nine seasons (1970 to 1978) as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2, and Formula 5000.

Surtees
Surteeslogo
Full nameSurtees Racing Organisation
BaseEdenbridge, Kent, United Kingdom
Founder(s)John Surtees
Noted staffLen Terry
Noted driversUnited Kingdom John Surtees
United Kingdom Derek Bell
Brazil Carlos Pace
Italy Andrea de Adamich
United Kingdom Mike Hailwood
Germany Jochen Mass
Formula One World Championship career
First entry1970 British Grand Prix
Races entered119
EnginesCosworth DFV
Constructors'
Championships
0
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories0
Pole positions0
Fastest laps4[1]
Final entry1978 Canadian Grand Prix

History

The team was formed by John Surtees, a four-time 500cc motorcycle champion and the 1964 Formula One champion. Surtees formed the team in 1966 for the newly formed CanAm series (an unlimited sports car series), winning the championship as an owner/driver in its first year. He fielded an entry in another newly formed series in 1969, becoming part of Formula 5000 after taking over the failed Leda F5000 project, and his team constructed its own cars for the first time. His team was successful, winning five races, consecutively, during a twelve race season.

This inspired Surtees to expand to Formula One, and after having had a difficult season with BRM in 1969, he decided to become an owner/driver again. The team ran the full 1970 season, but John Surtees was forced to run the first four races in an old McLaren due to a delay in the construction of his in-house F1 car. The new BP-sponsored car earned its first (and only) points that year in the Canadian Grand Prix.

Surtees added a second full-time car in 1971 for German driver Rolf Stommelen, and ran a third car for various drivers in a number of races. Three drivers, Surtees, Stommelen, and motorcycling champion Mike Hailwood earned three points each for the marque that year.

After the 1971 season, Surtees retired from full-time competition, and the team ended up with three new full-time drivers in 1972. Hailwood returned to Surtees for a full year; joining him were Australian Tim Schenken and Italian Andrea de Adamich, the latter of whom brought sponsorship money to the team. Hailwood produced Surtees' first podium finish that year in the Italian Grand Prix, finishing second to Emerson Fittipaldi. All three drivers scored points for the team, and Surtees finished fifth in the Constructors' Championship.

Schenken was replaced in 1973 by Brazilian Carlos Pace, and the team only ran two full-time cars after de Adamich left following the season opener. Pace finished third in Austria and fourth in Germany, but it was the only points finishes the team had all season, as Hailwood was left scoreless. Hailwood departed for McLaren after the year, being replaced by Jochen Mass in 1974. It was a difficult year for Surtees, as Pace left the team in mid-season, and replacement Derek Bell struggled to qualify for races, capped by Austrian driver Helmut Koinigg's fatal crash at the 1974 United States Grand Prix. A fourth place by Pace at his home track were the only points Surtees managed to get, and they failed to finish in the top ten in the Constructors' Championship.

Low on money for 1975, the team pared back to a single car for John Watson (although a second car was entered for Dave Morgan at Silverstone). The season was a tremendous struggle for Surtees, with no points scored, and the team missed three of the final four races. 1976 was much better, however, as Surtees landed an otherwise controversial sponsorship deal with Durex condoms, and Australian Alan Jones joined the team. Jones finished fifth in Belgium and at Brands Hatch, and fourth in Japan. A second car, with Chesterfield sponsorship, was entered for American Brett Lunger, while a customer car was raced by Frenchman Henri Pescarolo during the second half of the season. With seven points, Surtees placed tenth in the Constructors' Championship.

Jones's success resulted in him leaving the team for the emerging Shadow team, and money problems forced Surtees to run one car regularly again in 1977, this time for Vittorio Brambilla. Brambilla's season was effective, also finishing in the points three times. Still, his good results did not prevent Surtees from further monetary troubles. In 1978, the team added a second car for pay driver, Briton Rupert Keegan, but the money problems continued. A lack of decent results caused further problems.

Unable to get sufficient money, the team left F1 after the 1978 season, despite having a car built for 1979. After racing the car in the British Aurora championship (formerly F5000) briefly that year, Surtees Racing Organization was closed for good.

Models

SurteesTS7BarryBoor

John Surtees at the wheel of the TS7 at its Brands Hatch debut.

Surtees TS9B Goodwood 2008

The TS9B being demonstrated at the 2008 Goodwood Festival of Speed.

Surtees TS14 Mallory Park

The TS14 being driven at Mallory Park in 2009.

John Watson TS16

John Watson in the TS16 at the 1975 British Grand Prix.

SurteesTS19BarryBoor

Brett Lunger entering Hawthorn's Bend at Brands Hatch during the 1976 British Grand Prix in a TS19.

Surtees TS19 2007

Alan Jones' 1976 TS19 being driven in 2007.

SurteesTS20BarryBoor

Vittorio Brambilla driving the TS20 at the 1978 British Grand Prix.

  • TS5 1969-1970 F5000/Formula A. Based on the abandoned Leda prototype. Runner up in the 1969 Guards F5000 championship. Intended as a customer car, but there were no takers.
  • TS7 1970 Formula One. Designed by Surtees, Shahab Ahmed, and Peter Connew. DFV/Hewland "kit car" followed closely on TS5 layout. Surtees won the Oulton Park International Gold Cup non-Championship race in this car.
  • TS8 1971-1972 F5000. Runner up in Rothmans Championship in 1971.
  • TS9 1971-1972 Formula One. A derivative of the TS7 with a longer wheelbase and wider track. Surtees repeated his Oulton Park win in 1971.
  • TS10 1972 Formula 2. Powered by a Cosworth BDA engine Mike Hailwood convincingly won the 1972 European F2 Championship in this car. Two independent teams purchased TS10s but were not contenders in the series.
  • TS11 1972-1973 F5000. Based on the TS9 with a Chevrolet engine. Gijs van Lennep won the 1972 Rothmans European Formula 5000 Championship driving the TS11 and a McLaren M18. A TS11 chassis with TS8 bodywork was prepared to run the 1972 Tasman Series after the TS8 intended for the series was wrecked beyond repair. Hailwood finished second in the series in this car.
  • TS14 1972-1973 Formula One. This car marked the beginning of the end for Surtees. Firestone was anticipating leaving Formula One and had little interest in working with Surtees to cure the TS14's habit of devouring tires. It was the first car in F1 to fully comply with crumple-zone legislation, incorporating these into its side pods within which the radiators were mounted, laying down the floorplan for the vast majority of subsequent F1 designs. It was a very quick car at its introduction but a series of accidents and lack of development support did not help it reach its potential. John Surtees drove his last F1 race in the TS14 at Monza in 1972.
  • TS15 1973 Formula two. With BMW supplying engines exclusively to March Surtees was forced to settle for second place in the F2 Championships. A good car, but no match for the BMW engine. A development of this car, the TS17, was intended to run a Ford Motor Company V8 in F5000, but nothing came of the plan.
  • TS16 1974-1975 Formula One. Based on the TS14, but overweight and with less than top notch DFV engines. The team also failed to engage a single major sponsor for 1974 so money was tight to say the least. Only a single car was run and to cap off a truly terrible year driver Helmuth Koinigg was killed during the 1974 United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen. The car was run again in 1975 and John Watson scored in three non-Championship events, but no championship points were scored.
  • TS19 1976-1978 Formula One. A fresh car designed by John Surtees and Ken Sears the TS19 managed to score points for Surtees in 1976 and 1977, and even ran the opening races of the 1978 season.
  • TS20 1978 Formula One. A development of the TS19, the TS20 was a clean design that promised well, only to be completely overshadowed by the introduction of ground effects.

Complete Formula One World Championship results

The first table below details the complete World Championship Grand Prix results for the Surtees "works" team. The second table includes results from privately owned Surtees cars in World Championship Grands Prix.

Works team entries

(key) (results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Chassis Engines Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Points WCC
1970 McLaren M7C Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F RSA ESP MON BEL NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA MEX N/A1
United Kingdom John Surtees Ret Ret Ret 6
TS7 Ret 9 Ret Ret 5 Ret 8 3 8th
United Kingdom Derek Bell 6
1971 TS7
TS9
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F RSA ESP MON NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA 8 8th
United Kingdom John Surtees Ret 11 7 5 8 6 7 Ret Ret 11 17
Germany Rolf Stommelen 12 Ret 6 DSQ 11 5 10 7 DNS Ret
United Kingdom Brian Redman 7
United Kingdom Derek Bell Ret
United Kingdom Mike Hailwood 4 15
United States Sam Posey Ret
Netherlands Gijs van Lennep DNS
1972 TS9B
TS14
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F ARG RSA ESP MON BEL FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA 18 5th
Australia Tim Schenken 5 Ret 8 Ret Ret 17 Ret 14 11 Ret 7 Ret
Italy Andrea de Adamich Ret NC 4 7 Ret 14 Ret 13 14 Ret Ret Ret
United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Ret Ret Ret 4 6 Ret Ret 4 2 17
United Kingdom John Surtees Ret DNS
1973 TS9B
TS14A
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR NED GER AUT ITA CAN USA 7 7th
United Kingdom Mike Hailwood Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 8 Ret Ret Ret Ret 14 10 7 9 Ret
Brazil Carlos Pace Ret Ret Ret Ret 8 Ret 10 13 Ret 7 4 3 Ret Ret Ret
Brazil Luiz Bueno 12
Italy Andrea de Adamich 8
Germany Jochen Mass Ret 7 Ret
1974 TS16 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA 3 11th
Brazil Carlos Pace Ret 4 11 13 Ret Ret Ret
France José Dolhem DNQ DNQ Ret
United Kingdom Derek Bell DNQ 11 DNQ DNQ DNQ
Germany Jochen Mass Ret 17 Ret Ret Ret DNS Ret Ret Ret 14 Ret
France Jean-Pierre Jabouille DNQ
Austria Helmut Koinigg 10 Ret
Austria Dieter Quester 9
1975 TS16 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA ESP MON BEL SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA USA 0 14th
United Kingdom John Watson DSQ 10 Ret 8 Ret 10 16 Ret 13 11 10
United Kingdom Dave Morgan 18
1976 TS19 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN 7 10th
United States Brett Lunger 11 DNQ DNQ Ret 15 16 Ret Ret 10 14 15 11
Sweden Conny Andersson Ret
Japan Noritake Takahara 9
Australia Alan Jones NC 9 5 Ret 13 Ret 5 10 Ret 8 12 16 8 4
1977 TS19 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN 6 11th
Italy Vittorio Brambilla 7 Ret 7 Ret Ret 8 4 Ret 13 8 5 15 12 Ret 19 6 8
Austria Hans Binder Ret Ret 11 11 9 Ret 11 Ret Ret
Australia Larry Perkins 12 DNQ DNQ
France Patrick Tambay DNQ
Australia Vern Schuppan 12 7 16 DNQ
Italy Lamberto Leoni DNQ
1978 TS19
TS20
Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN 1 13th
United Kingdom Rupert Keegan Ret Ret Ret DNS Ret DNQ 11 DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ DNS
Italy Gimax DNQ
France René Arnoux 9 Ret
Italy Vittorio Brambilla 18 DNQ 12 Ret DNQ 13 7 Ret 17 9 Ret 6 DSQ Ret
Italy Beppe Gabbiani DNQ DNQ
Notes
  • ^1 – Not entered as a Constructor.

Results of other Surtees cars

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engines Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
1971 Stichting Autoraces Nederland TS7 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F RSA ESP MON NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA
Netherlands Gijs van Lennep 8
1972 Team Gunston TS9 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG RSA ESP MON BEL FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA
Rhodesia John Love 16
Champcar Inc. TS9B Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G United States Sam Posey 12
1974 AAW Racing TS16 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 F ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA
Finland Leo Kinnunen DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
1976 Team Norev Racing with BS Fabrications TS19 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN
France Henri Pescarolo DNQ Ret Ret DNQ 9 11 17 19 NC
ShellSport Whiting TS16 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G United Kingdom Divina Galica DNQ
1977 Melchester Racing TS19 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN
United Kingdom Tony Trimmer DNPQ

Can-Am results

Year Chassis Engine(s) Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 Pos Pts
1966 Lola T70 Mk.2 Chevrolet MNT BRD CAN LGS RIV STA
United Kingdom John Surtees 1 Ret Ret 12 1 1 1st 27
United Kingdom Graham Hill 3 9th 4
1967 Lola T70 Mk.2/3B Chevrolet ROA BRD MNT LGS RIV STA
United Kingdom John Surtees 3 4 Ret Ret Ret 1 3rd 16

See also

References

  • Hodges, David. A-Z of Formula Racing Cars 1945-1990, MBI Publishing Company, 1990. ISBN 1-901432-17-3

Footnotes

  1. ^ Total of 4 fastest laps = 3 fastest laps in Surtees cars plus John Surtees' fastest lap in the 1970 South African Grand Prix driving a McLaren

External links

1964 Formula One season

The 1964 Formula One season was the 18th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It included the 1964 World Championship of Drivers, won by John Surtees; and the 1964 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, won by Ferrari – both of which were contested concurrently over a series which commenced on 10 May and ended on 25 October after ten races. The season also included eight non-championship races for Formula One cars.

1964 Mexican Grand Prix

The 1964 Mexican Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Ciudad Deportiva Magdalena Mixhuca in Mexico City on October 25, 1964. It was race 10 of 10 in both the 1964 World Championship of Drivers and the 1964 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

It was perhaps the most dramatic finale in the history of the World Championship. Championship points could only be scored by the first six finishers (9–6–4–3–2–1 points). Arriving to the race, three drivers had a chance of winning the title: Graham Hill (BRM P261) with 39 points, John Surtees (Ferrari) with 34, and Jim Clark (Lotus 33-Climax) with 30. In order to win the title, Clark had to win the race, with Surtees finishing not higher than third and Hill not higher than fourth. Surtees could only win the title by finishing first, in each case, or second, unless Hill finished as high as third.

The race began with Clark leading from pole position with Dan Gurney running second in the Brabham-Climax (Gurney had only ten points going into this race having won the French Grand Prix and scored a sixth place at the Belgian Grand Prix). Hill and Lorenzo Bandini, Surtees's teammate, were duelling for third place, with Surtees a distant fifth, seemingly with no chance at winning the title. Then Bandini ran into the back of Hill's BRM, causing him to spin into the Armco, damaging his exhaust and lose a few places. Thereafter Hill's car ran with a crimped exhaust pipe, causing him to lose power. The championship was now firmly in Clark's grasp. If the positions remained the same, he would be champion with four victories to Hill's two, although they would be tied on points at 39. On the penultimate lap, an oil line failed ahd Clark's engine seized as the Lotus crossed the line, with one lap left to go. The positions were now Gurney–Bandini–Surtees, meaning the championship would be Hill's, so long as Sutrees placed no higher. Realizing Surtees could win the title by finishing second, the Ferrari team manager frantically signalled Bandini to slow down as he passed the pits to enter the last lap and let Surtees through. Bandini dutifully did so and Surtees finished second, thus winning the World Championship of Drivers by one point over Hill (40 to 39). Meanwhile, Gurney won the Grand Prix, almost unnoticed.

1964 United States Grand Prix

The 1964 United States Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on October 4, 1964, at the Watkins Glen Grand Prix Race Course in Watkins Glen, New York. It was race 9 of 10 in both the 1964 World Championship of Drivers and the 1964 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 110-lap race was won by BRM driver Graham Hill after he started from fourth position. John Surtees finished second for the Ferrari team and Brabham driver Jo Siffert came in third.

1966 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1966 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Spa-Francorchamps on 12 June 1966. It was race 2 of 9 in both the 1966 World Championship of Drivers and the 1966 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the 26th Belgian Grand Prix and was held over 28 laps of the 14.1-kilometre circuit for a race distance of 395 kilometres.

The race was won by British driver and 1964 world champion, John Surtees, driving a Ferrari 312 in a race that saw the field decimated by weather in the early laps. It was Surtees' fourth Grand Prix victory and his first since the 1964 Italian Grand Prix. Surtees won by 42 seconds over Austrian driver Jochen Rindt driving a Cooper T81, Rindt achieving his first podium finish and the first for the new Cooper-Maserati combination as the works Cooper Car Company team looked to the three-litre Maserati V12 sports car engine for the new regulations. Surtees' Italian team mate Lorenzo Bandini finished third in his Ferrari 246.

With a pair of podiums, Bandini took the lead in the championship by a point over the two race winners, Surtees and Jackie Stewart.

1966 Mexican Grand Prix

The 1966 Mexican Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Ciudad Deportiva Magdalena Mixhuca on October 23, 1966. It was race 9 of 9 in both the 1966 World Championship of Drivers and the 1966 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was the fifth Mexican Grand Prix. The race was held over 65 laps of the 5 km (3.1 mi) circuit for a race distance of 325 km (202 mi). It was the first run under the new three-litre formula.The race was won by British driver John Surtees driving a Cooper T81-Maserati, his first victory since leaving Scuderia Ferrari to join Cooper. Surtees lead home reigning world champion Australian owner-driver Jack Brabham, driving a Brabham BT20-Repco, H by eight seconds. A lap down in third place, also driving a Brabham BT20, was Brabham's teammate New Zealander Denny Hulme.

Surtees victory promoted him to second place in the championship, vaulting past Austrian driver Jochen Rindt of the Cooper works team.

1967 Italian Grand Prix

The 1967 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza on 10 September 1967. It was race 9 of 11 in both the 1967 World Championship of Drivers and the 1967 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The race was won by British driver John Surtees driving a Honda. It was the sixth and final career victory for Surtees, as well as the first ever race for the Honda RA300 which he drove to victory. This was the first Formula One race where start lights were used.

This race is considered one of Jim Clark's greatest performances in Formula One. He led the race until lap 12 when he picked up a puncture and lost an entire lap. He then spent the next 48 laps recovering through the field, taking the lead on lap 60, and pulled away. But on the final lap, a faulty fuel pump allowed Jack Brabham and Surtees to pass the Scotsman and finish first and second, with Surtees ahead by less than a car length at the line. This was the second victory for the Honda F1 team, and the last for the factory team until Jenson Button won the 2006 Hungarian Grand Prix. Some fans and journalists still consider this race to be, in terms of race action and excitement, the greatest Grand Prix of all time.

1972 Italian Grand Prix

The 1972 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on 10 September 1972. It was race 10 of 12 in both the 1972 World Championship of Drivers and the 1972 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

Before the race, the Monza circuit was modified with the addition of two chicanes, one before the Curva Grande and one at the site of the old Curva Vialone, in order to reduce speeds in the interests of safety.

The 55-lap race was won by Brazilian driver Emerson Fittipaldi, driving a Lotus-Ford, after he started from sixth position. With the win, Fittipaldi sealed the Drivers' Championship, becoming the youngest ever champion at 25 years and 273 days until superseded by Fernando Alonso at 24 years and 59 days in 2005; Lotus also secured the Manufacturers' Cup. Englishman Mike Hailwood finished second in a Surtees-Ford, with New Zealander Denny Hulme third in a McLaren-Ford.

The race marked the last win for American tyre manufacturer Firestone in Formula One. It was also the last race in which 1964 World Champion John Surtees competed.

1973 German Grand Prix

The 1973 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Nürburgring on 5 August 1973. It was race 11 of 15 in both the 1973 World Championship of Drivers and the 1973 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

The 14-lap race was won from pole position by Jackie Stewart, driving a Tyrrell-Ford. It was Stewart's 27th and final Grand Prix victory, a record that would stand until 1987. Teammate François Cevert finished second, with Jacky Ickx third in a McLaren-Ford.

The works March team did not participate in this race following the accident at the Dutch Grand Prix the previous weekend that had claimed the life of Roger Williamson. The Ferrari, Ensign, Tecno and Hesketh teams also did not participate. To boost the field, the McLaren, Brabham and Surtees teams all entered three cars: Ferrari released Ickx to drive the third McLaren; Rolf Stommelen drove the third Brabham in place of the injured Andrea de Adamich; and Jochen Mass drove the third Surtees.

Carlos Pace

José Carlos Pace (October 6, 1944 – March 18, 1977) was a racing driver from Brazil. He participated in 73 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on March 4, 1972. He won one race, achieved six podiums, and scored a total of 58 championship points. He also secured one pole position.

Cosworth

Cosworth is a British automotive engineering company founded in London in 1958 (1958), specialising in high-performance internal combustion engines, powertrain, and electronics; for automobile racing (motorsport) and mainstream automotive industries. Cosworth is based in Northampton, England, with American facilities in Indianapolis, Shelby Charter Township, Michigan and Mooresville, North Carolina.

Cosworth has collected 176 wins in Formula One (F1) as engine supplier, ranking third with most wins, behind Ferrari and Mercedes.

Derek Bell (racing driver)

Derek Reginald Bell (born 31 October 1941 in Pinner, Middlesex, England) is a British racing driver who was extremely successful in sportscar racing, winning the Le Mans 24 hours five times, the Daytona 24 three times and the World Sportscar Championship twice. He also raced in Formula One for the Ferrari, Wheatcroft, McLaren, Surtees and Tecno teams. He has been described by fellow racer Hans-Joachim Stuck as one of the most liked drivers of his generation.

Harry Altham

Harry Surtees Altham (30 November 1888 – 11 March 1965) was an English cricketer who became an important figure in the game as an administrator, historian and coach. His Wisden obituary described him as "among the best known personalities in the world of cricket". He died of a heart attack just after he had given an address to a cricket society.

Altham was educated at Repton School and Trinity College, Oxford, and served in the British Army during World War I as a Major with the 60th Rifles. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and the Military Cross (MC), and was mentioned in despatches on three occasions. He was a schoolmaster and a cricket coach at Winchester College, a position that he held for thirty years, and was also the housemaster of Chernocke House.

Altham's son, Richard, played in two first-class matches for Oxford University in 1947-1948.

Honda RA300

The Honda RA300 was a Formula One racing car produced by Honda Racing, and introduced towards the end of the 1967 Formula One season. It retained the same V12 engine as the preceding RA273 car, but the chassis was designed by Lola's Eric Broadley and based on a previous Lola Indianapolis 500 car, the T90. Internally, Lola designated the RA300 the T130. This collaboration resulted in the machine quickly being dubbed the "Hondola" by the motorsports press.

Broadley's chassis was much lighter and sweeter-handling than the in-house RA273. The car initially performed impressively, winning in its first-ever World Championship race, the Italian Grand Prix at Monza. Driver John Surtees took the lead from Jim Clark's Lotus and Jack Brabham's Brabham on the final lap, after Clark ran out of fuel and Brabham ran wide. However, the RA300 flattered to deceive, and this would turn out to be the only lap that the car would lead. It remains the only F1 car ever to take its single victory in its very first Grand Prix, and on the only lap it would ever lead.

Honda continued with the RA300 for the remainder of the 1967 season, Surtees finishing fourth at the final race in Mexico. The car was then raced one last time at the opening race of the 1968 season in South Africa, Surtees finishing eighth, before being superseded by the RA301, a design closely based on the RA300.

The 48-valve V12 engine first appeared in the RA273 at the 1966 Italian Grand Prix, driven by Richie Ginther. In spite of weighing 740 kg (dry), it was capable of spinning the rear tyres at 100 mph in third gear. With cylinder dimensions of 78.0 x 52.2 mm and a displacement of 2,993.17 cc, a target of 400-440 bhp at 12,000 rpm was quoted. The engine used by Surtees at Monza in 1967 was quoted by Motoring News as developing only 396 bhp, but with improved torque and response. The vehicle weight excess over the 500 kg minimum had been approximately halved.

Honda RA301

The Honda RA301 was a Formula One racing car produced by Honda Racing for the 1968 Formula One season. It was introduced during the 1968 Spanish Grand Prix, the second round of the season. Like its predecessor (RA300), the car was co-developed by Lola Cars, and called "Lola T180" by Lola Cars.

The car was an update of the previous season's RA300, using the same RA273E engine. As Honda was also focused on developing the air-cooled RA302, the RA301's development suffered and Surtees only managed a best of second place in the France. Poor reliability saw him managing to finish just two other races.

The car was planned to be replaced by the RA302 at the 1968 French Grand Prix, but Surtees refused to drive the new car because of safety concerns. After the death of Jo Schlesser at that race, Surtees again refused to drive the RA302 at the 1968 Italian Grand Prix, and the RA301 was used until the end of the season.

With Honda's withdrawal from Formula One at the end of the season, the RA301 was the last F1 car raced by Honda until the 2006 Formula One season's Honda RA106.

Honda RA302

The Honda RA302 was a Formula One racing car produced by Honda Racing, and introduced by Honda Racing France during the 1968 Formula One season. The car was built based on the order by Soichiro Honda to develop an air-cooled Formula One engine. Thus, the magnesium-skinned car was forcibly entered in the Formula One race alongside the water-cooled, aluminum-bodied RA301 which had been developed by the existing Honda team and British Lola Cars.

It would only appear in one race, the 1968 French Grand Prix at Rouen-Les-Essarts, driven by Jo Schlesser. Schlesser was chosen to drive the RA302 because normal Honda driver John Surtees (who was the 1964 world champion and would finish second in that race) refused to drive it as he deemed it to be unsafe and labelled it as a "potential deathtrap". This was proven on lap two of the Grand Prix; Schlesser crashed at the Virage des Six Frères section of the circuit and the car came to rest sideways against a bank. The magnesium-bodied Honda and 58 laps worth of fuel ignited instantly, killing Schlesser and destroying the original RA302.A second RA302 was built, with slight modifications, earmarked for Surtees to drive at the next race, but when Surtees again refused to drive it, Honda decided to pull out of Grand Prix racing and did not return as a constructor until the 2006 Formula One season with the Honda RA106. In 2012, the RA302 intended for Surtees at the Italian Grand Prix was on display at the Honda Collection Hall.

Jochen Mass

Jochen Richard Mass (born 30 September 1946) is a German former racing driver.

John Surtees

John Surtees, (11 February 1934 – 10 March 2017) was an English Grand Prix motorcycle road racer and Formula One driver. He was a four-time 500cc motorcycle World Champion – winning that title in 1956, 1958, 1959 and 1960 – the Formula One World Champion in 1964, and remains the only person to have won World Championships on both two and four wheels. He founded the Surtees Racing Organisation team that competed as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2 and Formula 5000 from 1970 to 1978. He was also the ambassador of the Racing Steps Foundation.

John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort

Field Marshal John Standish Surtees Prendergast Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort, (10 July 1886 – 31 March 1946) was a senior British Army officer. As a young officer during the First World War he was decorated with the Victoria Cross for his actions during the Battle of the Canal du Nord. During the 1930s he served as Chief of the Imperial General Staff (the professional head of the British Army). He is most famous for commanding the British Expeditionary Force sent to France in the first year of the Second World War, which was evacuated from Dunkirk. Gort later served as Governor of Gibraltar and Malta, and High Commissioner for Palestine and Transjordan.

Robert Surtees (cinematographer)

Robert L. Surtees, A.S.C. (August 9, 1906 – January 5, 1985) was an American cinematographer who won three Academy Awards for the films King Solomon's Mines, The Bad and the Beautiful and the 1959 version of Ben Hur. Surtees worked at various studios, including Universal, UFA, Warner Brothers, and MGM, lighting for such luminaries as Howard Hawks, Mike Nichols, and William Wyler, gaining him a reputation as one of the most versatile cinematographers of his time.

2019 season
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