Superciliated wren

The superciliated wren (Cantorchilus superciliaris) is a species of bird in the family Troglodytidae. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.

Superciliated wren
Superciliated Wren - Ecuador S4E9157 (17166675562)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Troglodytidae
Genus: Cantorchilus
Species:
C. superciliaris
Binomial name
Cantorchilus superciliaris
(Lawrence, 1869)
Synonyms

Thryothorus superciliaris

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Thryothorus superciliaris". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
Cantorchilus

Cantorchilus is a genus of birds in the wren family. Established by Nigel I. Mann, F. Keith Barker, Jeff A. Graves, Kimberly A. Dingess-Mann and Peter J. B. Slater in 2006, it contains 10 species. All of the species assigned to it were previously included in the genus Thryothorus.

List of birds of Ecuador

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Ecuador including those of the Galápagos Islands. The avifauna of Ecuador has 1635 confirmed species, of which seven are endemic to the mainland and 30 are endemic to the Galápagos. Four have been introduced by humans, 64 are rare or vagrants, and two have been extirpated. An additional 49 species are hypothetical (see below).

Except as an entry is cited otherwise, the list of species is that of the South American Classification Committee (SACC) of the American Ornithological Society. The list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families, and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) are also those of the SACC.The following tags have been used to highlight certain categories of occurrence.

(V) Vagrant - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Ecuador

(EG) Endemic - Galápagos - a species endemic to the Galápagos Islands

(EM) Endemic - mainland - a species endemic to mainland Ecuador

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Ecuador as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(H) Hypothetical - a species recorded but with "no tangible evidence" according to the SACC

List of birds of Peru

This is a list of the bird species recorded in Peru. The avifauna of Peru has 1802 confirmed species, of which 106 are endemic, two have been introduced by humans, and 44 are rare or vagrants. An additional 54 species are hypothetical (see below).

Except as an entry is cited otherwise, the list of species is that of the South American Classification Committee (SACC) of the American Ornithological Society. The list's taxonomic treatment (designation and sequence of orders, families, and species) and nomenclature (common and scientific names) are also those of the SACC.

The following tags have been used to highlight certain categories of occurrence.

(V) Vagrant - a species that rarely or accidentally occurs in Peru

(E) Endemic - a species endemic to Peru

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to Peru as a consequence, direct or indirect, of human actions

(H) Hypothetical - a species recorded but with "no tangible evidence" according to the SACC

List of least concern birds

As of May 2019, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 8405 least concern avian species. 76% of all evaluated avian species are listed as least concern.

No subpopulations of birds have been evaluated by the IUCN.

This is a complete list of least concern avian species evaluated by the IUCN. Where possible common names for taxa are given while links point to the scientific name used by the IUCN.

Sibley-Monroe checklist 15

The Sibley-Monroe checklist was a landmark document in the study of birds. It drew on extensive DNA-DNA hybridisation studies to reassess the relationships between modern birds.

Wren

The wren is a family of mostly small, brown, passerine birds in the (mainly) New World family Troglodytidae. The family includes 88 species divided into 19 genera. Only the Eurasian wren occurs in the Old World, where in Anglophone regions, it is commonly known simply as the "wren", as it is the originator of the name. The name wren has been applied to other, unrelated birds, particularly the New Zealand wrens (Acanthisittidae) and the Australian wrens (Maluridae).

Most wrens are small and rather inconspicuous, except for their loud and often complex songs. Notable exceptions are the relatively large members of the genus Campylorhynchus, which can be quite bold in their behavior. Wrens have short wings that are barred in most species, and they often hold their tails upright. As far as is known, wrens are primarily insectivorous, eating insects, spiders, and other small arthropods, but many species also eat vegetable matter and some take small frogs and lizards and many more amphibians.

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