Super Bowl Ad Meter

The USA Today Super Bowl Ad Meter is an annual survey taken of television commercials by USA Today in a live poll during the telecast in the United States of the Super Bowl, the annual professional American football championship game of the National Football League. The survey, which started in 1989, uses a live response on a zero-to-ten scale (zero being the worst, ten the best) of focus groups based in McLean, Virginia, the newspaper headquarters and one (or more) site(s) around the country.

Background

The Super Bowl became the must-see event for advertisers during the third quarter of the telecast of Super Bowl XVIII on CBS, when Apple Computer debuted a one-time-only advertisement for their Macintosh computer titled 1984, directed by Ridley Scott. As the Los Angeles Raiders routed the Washington Redskins, 38-9, the Apple commercial, not the game, was the most-talked about item around water coolers the very next day. Since then, major advertisers have used the game, paying as much as seven figures (averaging over US $5 million for one 30-second slot as of 2018)[1], excluding production expenses) to showcase their work and generate buzz that many people tune into television's biggest event of the year just to watch the commercials, not just the actual game. For those reasons, USA Today started the Ad Meter, a poll that gives live responses per second of each commercial. According to the newspaper, ads by rule are limited to those shown during the game - from opening kickoff to the end of the game, excluding those shown at halftime or local commercials - are officially qualified for consideration in the Ad Meter survey.

A new element was added for 2012, as users of Facebook and those logging onto the USA Today website were involved in a second survey that lasted until February 7 at 6:00 pm US EST. The online element was added to the regular meter for 2013.

Past winners

Year Advertiser Ad Description
1989 American Express Actors Jon Lovitz and Dana Carvey (both starring at the time on Saturday Night Live) go to the big game with credit cards - Lovitz with Visa, Carvey with American Express.
1990 Nike Various announcers (Harry Caray among others) call a multisport event with the likes of Wayne Gretzky, Michael Jordan and Bo Jackson.
1991 Diet Pepsi When Coca-Cola pulled a humorous ad in light of the First Iraqi war, Diet Pepsi scored big with Ray Charles and others singing their "You Got the Right One, Baby" jingle.
1992 Nike Michael Jordan and Bugs Bunny (calling himself "Hare Jordan") go to Mars and team up to take on an evil basketball team fielded by Marvin the Martian, with the fate of Earth at stake. The spot served as the inspiration for the movie Space Jam.
1993 McDonald's Michael Jordan and Larry Bird play an outrageous game of H-O-R-S-E throughout Chicago for a Big Mac.
1994 Pepsi-Cola A lab chimp turns into a party animal at the beach after drinking soda.
1995 Pepsi-Cola A boy on the beach tries to suck the last drop of Pepsi out of a bottle with a straw, sucking so hard that the backlash pulls him through the straw and into the bottle. His little sister then yells, "Mom, he's done it again!"
1996 Pepsi-Cola A fictional Coke driver takes a can of Pepsi and the whole shelf of cans tumbles onto the floor in a simulated security camera footage, with the Hank Williams song "Your Cheatin' Heart" in the background. This commercial was chosen as the best ever ad in the twenty-year history in a special survey of the previous poll winners in 2008.
1997 Pepsi-Cola Computer animated grizzly bears do their Pepsi-inspired 1980s classics with the YMCA.
1998 Pepsi-Cola A skysurfer does aerial tricks with a goose, and they share a Pepsi afterwards.
1999 Budweiser Two dalmatian puppies are separated at birth, and one becomes the mascot of the Clydesdale-driven beer wagon.
2000 Budweiser Rex the Wonder Dog imagines chasing a Budweiser truck, only to blindly leap headfirst onto a mini-van.
2001 Bud Light Cedric the Entertainer's dream date is ruined when he accidentally shakes a pair of Bud Light bottles which explode all over his girlfriend.
2002 Bud Light A girlfriend entices her beau into bed with Bud Light, but he slides on the satin sheets and flies out the apartment window.
2003 Budweiser Spoofing the instant replay challenge rule, a real zebra reviews a disputed call, holding up a football game between Clydesdale horses. One of the two humans watching calls the "official" a jackass, while the other, apparently oblivious to the epithet, seriously responds that it's a zebra.
2004 Bud Light Two dog trainers outdo one another, until one dog bites the other trainer in the groin. This came in the midst of the aftermath of the controversial halftime show that year.
2005 Bud Light A frightened skydiver (Jonny Lee) making his first jump is enticed with a six-pack of beer, but it only makes the plane's pilot jump after it.
2006 Bud Light A guy stocks his refrigerator full of Bud Light, and to keep his friends from drinking it, he installs it on a turntable. However, the turntable rotates into the apartment next door, and the guys inside are extremely happy to see the "magic fridge" return, even to the point of worshiping it.
2007 Budweiser Computer-generated crabs idolize a cooler filled with Bud.
2008 Budweiser Paying tribute to the 1976 Academy Award Best Picture Rocky, a Clydesdale is inspired by a rather unusual personal trainer to become a member of the hitch team for the iconic horse-drawn wagon: its dalmatian mascot.
2009 Doritos In the first ever fan-generated commercial to claim top ranking, two men use a snow globe to grant their wishes. One throws it at (and breaks the glass front panel of) a vending machine and gets his wish for "free" Doritos. The other wishes for a promotion, but accidentally throws it at his boss's groin. The ad makers, Joe and David Herbert of Batesville, Indiana, won US $1 million in a promotion sponsored by Doritos owner Pepsico.
2010 Snickers Octogenarian performers Betty White and Abe Vigoda play tackle football.
2011
(tie)
Bud Light Dog sitting. A guy sits intelligent dogs with a refrigerator full of Bud Light, and gets the intelligent dogs to cater a party for him serving said product. In a last shot, the dogs are playing cards with the guy picking up after them.
Doritos A boyfriend teases his girlfriend's pug with Doritos, closes and stands behind a glass door, causing the pug to run towards him, the pug knocks down the glass door to be on top of the boyfriend and gets the Doritos. This ad, because of the tie, was awarded $1 million from Pepsico, the second time in three years an ad created by online users won.
2012 Doritos (panel; online) Another low-budget dog ad from Doritos won the creator, Jonathan Friedman (who lives in Virginia Beach, Virginia), the third $1 million bonus offered by Pepsico in four years by having the owner of a cat bribed by his dog with a small bag of the sponsor's product in the panel voting. Cost of the ad was $20. The online winner, announced February 7, was another fan-made Doritos ad called "Sling Baby", created by West Los Angeles resident Kevin Willson. The ad featured 17-month-old Jonah Folk, who was used by his grandmother to steal a bag of Doritos from a boy who was taunting them with the bag. They achieved this by using the baby's chair as a slingshot. The prize money of $1 million was divided among cast and crew, including Folk's father, who worked on the special effects.
2013 Budweiser A Clydesdale is born. Three years later, the Clydesdales come to town. The owner has an emotional reunion with the Clydesdale born at his farm. (The real life foal was born eighteen days before the ad aired.) The ad is set to "Landslide" by Fleetwood Mac.
2014 Budweiser A puppy from an adoption agency runs off to a farm to play with a Clydesdale horse. Every time he does that he goes back to the adoption agency. When he is adopted by a customer, the Clydesdales run out and take the puppy and the horse owner decides to keep it. The ad is set to "Let Her Go" by Passenger.
2015 Budweiser A lost puppy finds its way home and then is saved from trouble by some very powerful friends, namely some Clydesdale horses.[2]
2016 Hyundai Kevin Hart plays the role of a helicopter parent during his daughter's first date, using a car finder GPS app to track the Hyundai Genesis that she and her boyfriend are driving and following them wherever they go (including, at one point, from an actual helicopter). The ad is set to "Another One Bites the Dust" by Queen.[3]
2017 Kia Melissa McCarthy plays the role of a woman sent to protect the environment, but gets involved in various calamities. The ad is set to Holding Out for a Hero by Bonnie Tyler.
2018 Amazon.com Alexa has lost her voice, and celebrities like Anthony Hopkins, Rebel Wilson and Cardi B help out. The ad features Nobody Does It Better by Carly Simon. It barely beat out an NFL ad starring Eli Manning and Odell Beckham Jr. that parodied the movie Dirty Dancing.[4]
2019 NFL Marshawn Lynch knocks a football centerpiece off a cake during a gala celebrating the NFL's 100th season, prompting a fight for the ball involving over 40 current and past players.[5][6]

Multiple winners

  • Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser, Bud Light brands) - 14 (1999-2008, 2011, 2013-15)
  • Pepsico (Pepsi-Cola and Diet Pepsi drink brands, Frito-Lay Doritos) -10 (1991, 1994–98, 2009, 2011–12)
  • Nike - 2 (1990, 1992)

See also

  • Adbowl - A popular website with a similar system

References

  1. ^ "Super Bowl LII: How much does an ad cost?". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  2. ^ https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2015/02/01/usa-today-ad-meter-2015-super-bowl-money/22378605/
  3. ^ http://admeter.usatoday.com/2016/02/07/the-5-best-super-bowl-50-commercials-according-to-ad-meter-voters/
  4. ^ "Amazon edges NFL in Ad Meter Even Closer Than Super Bowl LII". usatoday.com. Retrieved February 5, 2018.
  5. ^ "Just about every past and present NFL star showed up in the NFL 100 Super Bowl ad". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 2019-02-04.
  6. ^ "Super Bowl 2019: See the epic 'NFL 100' ad". For The Win. 2019-02-04. Retrieved 2019-02-04.

External links

2019 NFL season

The 2019 NFL season will be the 100th season of the National Football League (NFL). The season will begin on September 5, 2019 with the NFL Kickoff Game with the Chicago Bears hosting the Green Bay Packers. The season will conclude with Super Bowl LIV, the league's championship game, scheduled for February 2, 2020, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami, Florida.

Abe Vigoda

Abraham Charles Vigoda (; February 24, 1921 – January 26, 2016) was an American actor best known for his portrayals of Salvatore Tessio in The Godfather (1972) and Phil Fish in Barney Miller (1975–1977, 1982) and Fish (1977–1978).

Adriana Lima

Adriana Lima (Brazilian Portuguese: [adɾiˈãnɐ ˈlimɐ]; born June 12, 1981) is a Brazilian model and actress, best known as a Victoria's Secret Angel from 1999 to 2018, (being their longest-running model and named "the most valuable Victoria's Secret Angel" in 2017), as a spokesmodel for Maybelline cosmetics since 2003 and for her Super Bowl and Kia Motors commercials. At the age of 15, Lima won Ford's "Supermodel of Brazil" competition, and took second place the following year in the Ford "Supermodel of the World" competition before signing with Elite Model Management in New York City.

Lima is currently ranked by Models.com as one of the New Supers in the fashion industry. Since 2014, Lima has been the world's second highest-paid model. In 2012, she came in 4th on the Forbes top-earning models list, estimated to have earned $7.3 million in one year. In 2013, she came in 3rd place and in 2014 she came in 2nd place with earnings of $8 million. In 2015, she came in 2nd place with earnings of $9 million. In 2016, she kept the second place with earnings of $10.5 million.Lima has served as brand ambassador for the Barcelona-based clothing brand Desigual, for the Beachwear collection of Italian brand Calzedonia, and for the ready-to-wear collection of Italian brand Sportmax. She is currently an ambassador for IWC, Puma, and Chopard.

Alfonso Gomez-Rejon

Alfonso Gomez-Rejon (sometimes Alfonso Gómez-Rejón) is an American film and television director. His television program credits include several episodes of Glee and several episodes of American Horror Story. He was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing For a Miniseries for American Horror Story: Coven. He is most known for his second feature film Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, for Indian Paintbrush.

BBDO

BBDO is a worldwide advertising agency network, with its headquarters in New York City. The agency began in 1891 with George Batten's Batten Company, and later in 1928, through a merger of BDO (Barton, Durstine & Osborn) and Batten Co. the agency became Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn. BBDO Worldwide has been named the "Most Awarded Agency Network in the World" by The Gunn Report for six consecutive years beginning 2005. It has won "Network of the Year" at the Cannes Lions five times. With more than 15,000 employees in 289 offices in 80 countries, it is the largest of three global networks (BBDO, DDB, TBWA) of agencies in Omnicom's portfolio. BBDO was named Global Agency of the Year by Adweek in 2011. It has also been named Agency of the Year in 2005 by Adweek, Advertising Age, and Campaign. In 2006, Mayor Michael Bloomberg proclaimed January 10 as BBDO day in recognition of the strength of its advertising, as well as its contributions to New York City.

Betty White

Betty Marion White Ludden (born January 17, 1922) is an American actress and comedian, with the longest television career of any female entertainer, spanning 80 years. Regarded as a pioneer of television, she is one of the first women to have control both in front of and behind the camera and is recognized as the first woman to produce a sitcom (Life with Elizabeth), which contributed to her receiving the honorary title Mayor of Hollywood in 1955.She is known for her award-winning roles as Sue Ann Nivens on The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1973–77) and Rose Nylund on The Golden Girls (1985–92) – the Writers Guild of America has included both sitcoms in its list of the 101 Best Written TV Series of All Time – and Elka Ostrovsky on Hot in Cleveland (2010–15).

A staple guest of many American game shows such as Password, Match Game, and The $25,000 Pyramid, White has been dubbed the 'First Lady of Game Shows' and became the first woman to receive an Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show Host in 1983 for the show Just Men! She is also known for her appearances on Boston Legal, Mama's Family, and Saturday Night Live.

In a career that has spanned 80 years, she has received eight Emmy Awards in various categories, three American Comedy Awards, three Screen Actors Guild Awards, and a Grammy Award. She also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, is a Television Hall of Fame inductee (class of 1995), and a Disney Legend (class of 2009).

Crash the Super Bowl

The Crash the Super Bowl contest was an annual online commercial competition run by Frito-Lay. Consumers were invited to create their own Doritos ads and each year, at least one fan-made commercial was guaranteed to air during the Super Bowl. In later editions of the contest, Doritos offered bonus prizes ranging from $400,000 to $1,000,000. Eight editions of the Crash the Super Bowl commercial contest were held between 2006 and 2016 and, during that time, fans submitted more than 36,000 entries.

Doritos

Doritos () is an American brand of flavored tortilla chips produced since 1964 by Frito-Lay, a wholly owned subsidiary of PepsiCo. The original Doritos were not flavored. The first flavor was Taco, released in 1967, though other flavors have since debuted for the company. The concept for Doritos originated in a restaurant at Disneyland.

Doritos has also gained notability for its marketing campaigns, including many ads aired during the Super Bowl.

Gino Bona

Gino Bona (born April 14, 1973) is an American marketing professional. In January 2007, he won the National Football League's "Pitch Us Your Idea For the Best Super Bowl Commercial Ever" contest. His concept was turned into a commercial that aired on February 4, 2007 during the Super Bowl XLI telecast on CBS.

Holding Out for a Hero

"Holding Out for a Hero" is a song recorded by Welsh singer Bonnie Tyler for the soundtrack to the 1984 film Footloose, and later included on her 1986 album Secret Dreams and Forbidden Fire. It was written by Jim Steinman and Dean Pitchford. Initially, the song only just reached the Top 100 in the UK Singles Chart, but made it to number 2 the following year, and re-entered the charts again at number 69 in 1991. The song reached No. 1 on the Irish Singles Chart on 28 September 1985. It reached the top 40 in the United States and Canada.

The song's instrumental break was reused from an earlier song by Jim Steinman called "Stark Raving Love", which featured on Steinman's 1981 album Bad for Good.

Joe Pytka

Joe Pytka (born November 4, 1938) is an American film, television, commercial and music video director born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He holds the record for the most nominations for the Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directing – Commercials.

Marketing buzz

Marketing buzz or simply buzz—a term used in viral marketing—is the interaction of consumers and users of a product or service which amplifies or alters the original marketing message. This emotion, energy, excitement, or anticipation about a product or service can be positive or negative. Buzz can be generated by intentional marketing activities by the brand owner or it can be the result of an independent event that enters public awareness through social or traditional media such as newspapers. Marketing buzz originally referred to oral communication but in the age of Web 2.0, social media such as Facebook and Twitter are now the dominant communication channels for marketing buzz.

In the 16th-early-20th centuries, nearly every town had its local weekly or monthly newspapers, and subscribed editions of larger publications were regularly carried by post riders to distant populations, where their key news stories from nearby county seat or capitols and far off cities were regularly read aloud in local taverns—which were much more a part of daily life than today's bars. On a predictable schedule, these subscriptions readings would occur on various nights, giving the tavern an attraction to draw in visitors, and a gathering place for men to discuss the implications of such news.

Mofilm

MOFILM is a British-based content sourcing company, which allows users to produce video and photographic content for various brands and social causes. The company was co-founded by Jeffrey Merrihue. Jon Landau is the Chairman of the MOFILM Advisory board.

The website has 50,000 filmmakers who can produce work with a number of companies, including, brands such as Pepsi and Chevrolet. In 2009, the company had Kevin Spacey as its host for the MOFILM Barcelona 2009 Awards. In 2013, it was ranked 43rd on Sunday Times Hiscox Tech Track 100 list.

See the USA in Your Chevrolet

The song "See The U.S.A. In Your Chevrolet" (title as filed for 1950 copyright) is a commercial jingle from c. 1949, with lyrics and music by Leo Corday (ASCAP) and Leon Carr (ASCAP), written for the Chevrolet Division of General Motors. The song was the Chevrolet jingle sung on the show Inside U.S.A. with Chevrolet by Chevrolet's real-life husband-wife duo, Peter Lind Hayes and Mary Healy, years before it became associated with Dinah Shore through Chevrolet's decade-long sponsorship of her television shows. Dinah Shore sang the song after 1952, and it became something of a signature song for her. Later the song was also sung by male spokesman Pat Boone on his Pat Boone-Chevy Showroom (ABC) from 1957 through 1960. When the games of the Los Angeles Dodgers were televised in the 1960s, commercials were aired with the song sung by John Roseboro and Don Drysdale, whose singing careers, announcer Vin Scully said, were "destined to go absolutely nowhere."Missing punctuation, the song is also titled as "See the USA in Your Chevrolet" on IMDb. The title has been catalogued for ASCAP since year 2001, as "See The U S A In Your Chevrolet (Chevrolet)" (listed without publisher in the 2001 ASCAP ACE Database).

So God Made a Farmer

"So God Made a Farmer" was a speech given by radio broadcaster Paul Harvey at the 1978 Future Farmers of America convention. The speech was first published in 1986 in Harvey's syndicated column. The speech borrowed a few phrases from a 1975 article written by Harvey in the Gadsden Times, which was itself inspired by parts of a 1940 definition of a dirt farmer published in The Farmer-Stockman. The 1940 article was copied verbatim by Tex Smith in a letter to the editor in the Ellensburg Daily Record in 1949. The speech was given as an extension of the Genesis creation narrative referring to God's actions on the 8th day of creation. Harvey described the characteristics of a farmer in each phrase, ending them with the recurring "So God Made a Farmer".

The speech was used in a commercial by Ram Trucks during the fourth quarter of Super Bowl XLVII. The ad featured photographs of rural America set to a narration of a portion of Harvey's speech. In a collaboration with the FFA, Dodge agreed to donate $100,000 for every 1,000,000 views that the YouTube video of the ad received up to $1,000,000. This goal was reached in less than five days. There were eight photographers who participated and photographed the images in this commercial Andy Anderson, Matt Turley, Olaf Veltman, Andy Mahr, Kurt Markus, David Beltra, David Spielman, Mark Gooch, Jim Arndt, William Allard, and Kurt Markus.

Super Bowl XXXIX

Super Bowl XXXIX was an American football game played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2004 season. The Patriots defeated the Eagles by the score of 24–21. The game was played on February 6, 2005, at Alltel Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida, the first time the Super Bowl was played in that city.

The Patriots, who entered the Super Bowl after compiling a 14–2 regular season record, became the most recent team to win consecutive Super Bowls (As of 2019). New England also became the second team after the Dallas Cowboys to win three Super Bowls in four years. The Eagles were making their second Super Bowl appearance after posting a 13–3 regular season record.

The game was close throughout, with the teams battling to a 14–14 tie by the end of the third quarter. The Patriots then scored 10 points in the 4th quarter with Corey Dillon's 2-yard touchdown run and Adam Vinatieri's 22-yard field goal. The Eagles then cut their deficit to 24–21, with quarterback Donovan McNabb's 30-yard touchdown pass to receiver Greg Lewis, with 1:48 remaining in the game but could not sustain the comeback. Overall, New England forced four turnovers, while Patriots wide receiver Deion Branch was named Super Bowl MVP for recording 133 receiving yards and tied the Super Bowl record with 11 catches.To avoid the possibility of an incident similar to the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show during the previous year, the league selected Paul McCartney as a "safe" choice to perform during Super Bowl XXXIX's halftime. The broadcast of the game on Fox was watched by an estimated 86 million viewers.

Super Bowl commercials

The U.S. television broadcast of the Super Bowl – the championship game of the National Football League (NFL) – features many high-profile television commercials, colloquially known as Super Bowl ads. The phenomenon is a result of the game's extremely high viewership and wide demographics: Super Bowl games have frequently been among the United States' most watched television broadcasts, with Nielsen having estimated that Super Bowl XLIX in 2015 was seen by at least 114.4 million viewers in the United States, surpassing the previous year's Super Bowl as the highest-rated television broadcast in U.S. history. As such, advertisers have typically used commercials during the Super Bowl as a means of building awareness for their products and services among this wide audience, while also trying to generate buzz around the ads themselves so they may receive additional exposure, such as becoming a viral video.

Super Bowl commercials have become a cultural phenomenon of their own alongside the game itself; many viewers only watch the game to see the commercials, national surveys (such as the USA Today Super Bowl Ad Meter) judge which advertisement carried the best viewer response, and CBS has aired yearly specials since 2000 chronicling notable commercials from the game. Super Bowl advertisements have become iconic and well-known because of their cinematographic quality, unpredictability, surreal humor, and use of special effects. The use of celebrity cameos has also been common in Super Bowl ads. A number of major brands, including Budweiser, Coca-Cola, Doritos, GoDaddy and Master Lock, have been well known for making repeated appearances during the Super Bowl.

The prominence of airing a commercial during the Super Bowl has also carried an increasingly high price: the average cost of a 30-second commercial during the Super Bowl has ranged from $37,500 at Super Bowl I, to around $2.2 million at Super Bowl XXXIV in 2000, and by Super Bowl XLIX in 2015, had doubled to around $4.5 million. The cost of advertising during the Super Bowl has reached a point that some companies may not be able to recoup their costs from the resulting revenue. Some commercials airing during, or proposed to air during the game, have also attracted controversy due to the nature of their content.

Super Bowl commercials are largely limited to the United States' broadcast of the game. Complaints about the inability to view the ads are prevalent in Canada, where federal "simsub" regulations require pay television providers to replace feeds of programs from U.S. broadcast stations with domestic feeds if they are being broadcast at the same time as a Canadian broadcast station. In 2016, the CRTC, Canada's telecom regulator, enacted a policy to forbid the use of simsub during the Super Bowl, citing viewer complaints and a belief that these ads were an "integral part" of the game; Super Bowl LI was the first game to fall under this policy. The NFL's Canadian rightsholder Bell Media challenged the policy at the federal appeals court, arguing that it violated the Broadcasting Act by singling out a specific program for regulation, and devalued its broadcast rights to the game. The court, however, ruled in December 2017 that the CRTC's actions were reasonable.

Troy Hartman

Troy Hartman (born October 31, 1971) is a professional aerial stuntman, skydiver and inventor. He is an X Games gold medalist for skysurfing and accomplished television host for many shows, most notably the MTV series "Senseless Acts of Video". He was the face of the award-winning 1998 Pepsi Super Bowl commercial.Most recently, Troy built a jet-powered personal backpack and used it on skis and in flight. With the device he was capable of skiing uphill and attaining speeds of up to 47 mph. It can take off from the ground.

He is currently developing a jet wing similar to that used by Yves Rossy.

USA Today

USA Today is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company. The newspaper has a generally centrist audience. Founded by Al Neuharth on September 15, 1982, it operates from Gannett's corporate headquarters on Jones Branch Drive, in McLean, Virginia. It is printed at 37 sites across the United States and at five additional sites internationally. Its dynamic design influenced the style of local, regional, and national newspapers worldwide, through its use of concise reports, colorized images, informational graphics, and inclusion of popular culture stories, among other distinct features.With a weekly circulation of 1,021,638 and an approximate daily reach of seven million readers as of 2016, USA Today shares the position of having the widest circulation of any newspaper in the United States with The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. USA Today is distributed in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, and an international edition is distributed in Asia, Canada, Europe, and the Pacific Islands.

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