Sunshine tax

"Sunshine tax" or "Paradise tax" is an ironic term used in the United States and Canada to describe the phenomenon that salaries are often lower than the national average, and costs of living higher than the national average, in places that have a desirably temperate climate.[1]

The term can also be used to mean anything that has the effect of making costs higher in areas like the Sunbelt. In 2007, the San Diego Union-Tribune calculated the cost of the California sunshine tax at $1.1 billion just for the additional cost of gasoline in the state.[2]

In Hawaii, the same concept is called a "paradise tax". It arises because incomes are lower and the cost of living is higher in Hawaii than on the mainland.[3] It is not an actual tax, but a perceived persistent difference between costs among locations. It is also described as "the price you pay for paradise" or "the cost of living in paradise." Randall W. Roth, in a book entitled The Price of Paradise, listed a number of possible causes, including shipping costs, land availability, and differences in regulation.[4]

The phenomenon arises because many people are willing to accept lower earnings and higher costs of living to live in a place like Hawaii,[4] California,[5] Florida,[6] Colorado,[7] British Columbia,[8] or other places with an attractive climate.

"As most people know, everything seems to cost more in California. The houses are more expensive, the gas and groceries cost more and don’t ask about the cost of daycare. This added cost of living has inspired its own term – the sunshine tax. It is the added cost to live in one of the best climates on earth, where the sun shines almost every day."[9]

References

  1. ^ Dixon, John A. & Sherman, Paul B. (1990). Economics of protected areas: a new look at benefits and costs. Island Press. p. 36. ISBN 1-55963-032-9. Retrieved April 11, 2011.
  2. ^ "Sunshine tax: Drivers suffer the mistakes of politicians". San Diego Union-Tribune. March 15, 2007. Retrieved April 11, 2011.
  3. ^ Smith, James R. Living and Retiring in Hawaii: The 50th State in the 21st Century
  4. ^ a b Peter S. Adler, Joanne Punu, Randall W. Roth and Eric Yamamoto, "What is the paradise tax and what are its implications?" in Randall W. Roth, ed., The Price of Paradise, Volume II, Honolulu: Mutual Publishing, 1993
  5. ^ Horn, Jonathan (October 26, 2012). "The sunshine tax: Just how much is it?". San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved 23 January 2014.
  6. ^ "Intellectual labor is her life's work". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. February 26, 2007. Retrieved April 11, 2011.
  7. ^ Melcher, Michael F. (2007). The creative lawyer: a practical guide to authentic professional satisfaction. Chicago: ABA Publishing. p. 154. ISBN 978-1-59031-843-0. Retrieved April 11, 2011.
  8. ^ Jon Manchester (2009-07-09). "Some Fuel for Thought". Kelowna Daily Courier, via Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2011-07-03.
  9. ^ The Sunshine Tax, M is for Money, via Wayback Machine, September 14, 2009
Economy of San Diego

The economy of San Diego — of the city of San Diego and the Greater San Diego area, located in southwestern San Diego County, Southern California. The gross domestic product of Greater San Diego was $206 billion in 2014, 17th largest amongst metro areas in the United States and 4th largest amongst California's metro areas. The economy is also part of the San Diego–Tijuana international metropolitan conurbation.

The largest sectors of the San Diego's economy are defense/military, tourism, international trade, and research/manufacturing, respectively. In 2014, San Diego was designated by a Forbes columnist as the best city in the country to launch a small business or startup company.

Hawaii

Hawaii ( (listen) hə-WY-ee; Hawaiian: Hawaiʻi [həˈvɐjʔi]) is a state of the United States of America. It is the only state located in the Pacific Ocean and the only state composed entirely of islands.

The state encompasses nearly the entire Hawaiian archipelago, 137 islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). The volcanic archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania. At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are, in order from northwest to southeast: Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui, and Hawaiʻi. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "Hawaiʻi Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago.

Hawaii is the 8th smallest geographically and the 11th least populous, but the 13th most densely populated of the 50 states. It is the only state with an Asian American plurality. Hawaii has over 1.4 million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. The state capital and largest city is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu. The state's ocean coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S., after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida, and California. Hawaii is the most recent state to join the union, on August 21, 1959. It was an independent nation until 1898.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and East Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture.

Kelowna

Kelowna () is a city on Okanagan Lake in the Okanagan Valley in the southern interior of British Columbia, Canada. It serves as the head office of the Regional District of the Central Okanagan. The name Kelowna derives from an Okanagan language term for "grizzly bear".The Kelowna metropolitan area has a population of 194,882; the third-largest metropolitan area in the province, behind only Vancouver and Victoria. Additionally, the City of Kelowna is the seventh-largest city in the province. It ranks as the 22nd-largest in Canada and is the largest inland city in British Columbia. Kelowna's city proper contains 211.82 square kilometres (81.78 sq mi), and the census metropolitan area contains 2,904.86 square kilometres (1,121.57 sq mi). In 2016, the population of Kelowna consisted of 127,380 individuals occupying 53,903 private dwellings.Nearby communities include the City of West Kelowna (also referred to as Westbank, Westside) to the west across Okanagan Lake, Lake Country and Vernon to the north, and Peachland to the southwest, and further to the south, Summerland and Penticton.

Okanagan

The Okanagan (), also known as the Okanagan Valley and sometimes as the Okanagan Country, is a region in the Canadian province of British Columbia defined by the basin of Okanagan Lake and the Canadian portion of the Okanagan River. It is part of the Okanagan Country, extending into the United States as Okanogan County in north-central Washington. According to the 2016 Canadian census, the region's population is 362,258. The primary city is Kelowna.

The region is known for its dry, sunny climate, dry landscapes and lakeshore communities and particular lifestyle. The economy is retirement and commercial-recreation based, with outdoor activities such as boating and watersports, skiing and hiking. Agriculture has been focused primarily on fruit orchards, with a recent shift in focus to vineyards and wine.

The region stretches northwards via the Spallumcheen Valley to connect to Sicamous in the Shuswap Country, and reaches south of the Canada–United States border, where it continues as Okanagan Country. The Okanagan as a region is sometimes described as including the Boundary, Similkameen and Shuswap regions, though this is because of proximity and historic and commercial ties with those areas.

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