Suncook, New Hampshire

Suncook is a census-designated place (CDP) in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 5,379 at the 2010 census.[1] Approximately 2/3 of Suncook is located in the town of Pembroke, with the remainder in Allenstown.[2]

The village of Suncook formed along the falls of the Suncook River, which drops 70 feet (21 m) in one-half mile (1 km) just before joining the Merrimack River. Much of the center of the village is occupied by 19th-century factory buildings which once used the river's energy for hydropower. The buildings have now largely been converted to other uses. Much of Suncook's late 19th-century commercial village center has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Suncook was once home to the Suncook Valley Railroad, a shortline railroad company that operated northwest to Concord and northeast to Barnstead. The railroad operated on former Boston and Maine track that was sold to the company. The Suncook Valley Railroad went bankrupt in 1952 and all its track was torn up.

Suncook, New Hampshire
Center of Suncook village
Center of Suncook village
Location in Merrimack County and the state of New Hampshire.
Location in Merrimack County and the state of New Hampshire.
Coordinates: 43°7′51″N 71°27′10″W / 43.13083°N 71.45278°WCoordinates: 43°7′51″N 71°27′10″W / 43.13083°N 71.45278°W
CountryUnited States
StateNew Hampshire
CountyMerrimack
TownsPembroke, Allenstown
Area
 • Total3.87 sq mi (10.02 km2)
 • Land3.71 sq mi (9.60 km2)
 • Water0.16 sq mi (0.42 km2)
Elevation
269 ft (82 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total5,379
 • Density1,452/sq mi (560.5/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
03275
Area code(s)603
FIPS code33-75140
GNIS feature ID0870274

Geography

Suncook is located in the southern corner of the town of Pembroke and the western end of the town of Allenstown. The Suncook River runs through the center of the village and forms the boundary between the two towns. The CDP is bordered to the south by the town of Hooksett and to the west by the Merrimack River, which forms the Bow town line.

U.S. Route 3 runs through the east side of the CDP, leading northwest 7 miles (11 km) to Concord, the capital of New Hampshire, and south 10 miles (16 km) to Manchester, the state's largest city. New Hampshire Route 28 leads south from Suncook with Route 3 but leads northeast up the Suncook River valley 15 miles (24 km) to Pittsfield.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the Suncook CDP has a total area of 3.9 square miles (10.0 km2), of which 3.7 square miles (9.6 km2) are land and 0.2 square miles (0.4 km2), or 4.23%, are water.[1]

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, the Suncook CDP had a population of 5,379, of whom 3,585 (66.6%) lived in the town of Pembroke[3] and 1,794 (33.4%) lived in the town of Allenstown.[4] There were 2,236 households and 1,375 families residing in the CDP. There were 2,408 housing units, of which 172, or 7.1%, were vacant. The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.9% white, 0.9% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.4% some other race, and 1.6% from two or more races. 1.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[5]

Of the 2,236 households in the CDP, 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.8% were headed by married couples living together, 12.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.5% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38, and the average family size was 2.95.[5]

22.9% of residents in the CDP were under the age of 18, 7.4% were from age 18 to 24, 28.7% were from 25 to 44, 28.2% were from 45 to 64, and 13.0% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.0 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.[5]

For the period 2011-15, the estimated median annual income for a household was $56,181, and the median income for a family was $78,814. Male full-time workers had a median income of $45,154 versus $43,118 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $26,148. 10.7% of the population and 5.9% of families were below the poverty line, along with 10.6% of people under the age of 18 and 7.1% of people 65 or older.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Suncook CDP, New Hampshire". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  2. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. P.L. 94-171 County Block Maps (2010 Census)
  3. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Suncook CDP (part), Pembroke town, Merrimack County, New Hampshire". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  4. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): Suncook CDP (part), Allenstown town, Merrimack County, New Hampshire". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (DP-1): Suncook CDP, New Hampshire". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  6. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics: 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates (DP03): Suncook CDP, New Hampshire". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved October 23, 2017.

Further reading

  • Laurence Armand French. Frog Town: Portrait of a French Canadian Parish in New England (2004) about the St. Jean-Baptiste parish Suncook. excerpt
Caleb Stark

Caleb Stark (December 3, 1759 – August 28, 1838) was an American state senator. He was the eldest son of General John Stark and his wife Molly Stark.

David L. Jewell House

The David L. Jewell House is a historic house at 48 Grandview Avenue in Quincy, Massachusetts. The 2-1/2 story wood frame house was built in 1887 for David Jewell, a mill agent from Suncook, New Hampshire. The house is one of the most elaborate Queen Anne Victorians on Wollaston Hill, exhibiting a wide variety of decorative shingles, a domed tower, and varied roof and dormer gables. It has a large sloping front gable, which extends all the way down to the first floor, partially sheltering the elaborately decorated porch. Its carriage barn, now a garage, is one a small number of such surviving outbuildings in Quincy.The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.

Jacob Noyes Block

The Jacob Noyes Block is a historic commercial building at 48 Glass Street in the Pembroke side of Suncook, New Hampshire. Built about 1865, it is a distinctive local example of Italianate commercial architecture, and is the largest 19th-century commercial building in the village. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

Joseph LaPage

Joseph LaPage (born 1838 as Joseph Paget in Quebec, Canada - March 15, 1878 in Concord, New Hampshire, United States), also known as "The French Monster" and various other aliases, was a Canadian rapist, serial killer and necrophile who murdered four women in Canada and the United States, also attempting to kill his wife's sister and another unnamed woman. He was hanged for the murder of 17-year-old Josie Langmaid, which occurred in Pembroke, New Hampshire.

Noyes House

Noyes House may refer to:

in the United States (by state then city or town)

Noyes Mansion, Napa, California, listed on the NRHP in Napa County, California

William Noyes Farmstead, Ledyard, Connecticut, listed on the NRHP in New London County, Connecticut

Noyes House (New Canaan, Connecticut), listed on the NRHP in Fairfield County

J.A. Noyes House, Cambridge, Massachusetts, listed on the NRHP

James Noyes House, Newbury, Massachusetts, listed on the NRHP

Noyes-Parris House, Wayland, Massachusetts, listed on the NRHP

Jonathon L. and Elizabeth H. Wadsworth Noyes House, Faribault, Minnesota, listed on the NRHP in Rice County, Minnesota

Noyes Hall, State School for the Deaf, Faribault, Minnesota, listed on the NRHP in Rice County

Charles P. Noyes Cottage, White Bear Lake, Minnesota, listed on the NRHP

Noyes Cottage, Saranac Lake, New York, listed on the NRHP

John Noyes House, Starkey, New York, listed on the NRHP

Larsen-Noyes House Ephraim, Utah, listed on the NRHP in Sanpete County, Utah

Young-Noyes House, Charleston, West Virginia, listed on the NRHP

Suncook

The name Suncook may refer to a location in the United States:

The Suncook River in New Hampshire

The Suncook Lakes, at the head of the river

Suncook, New Hampshire, a village on the Suncook River

The USS Suncook (1865), a United States naval vessel

Suncook Valley Railroad

The Suncook Valley Railroad was a short-line railroad in the United States, originating in Suncook, New Hampshire, and terminating in Barnstead, New Hampshire. It was operated as its own business entity since September 28, 1924, when control was regained from the Boston and Maine Railroad. Starting in 1869, the Suncook Valley RR was leased by the Concord Railroad, and subsequently Concord & Montreal Railroad, then finally the B&M. It served the Suncook River valley region in central New Hampshire, stopping in key communities such as Epsom, Allenstown and Center Barnstead.

Suncook Village Commercial–Civic Historic District

The Suncook Village Commercial–Civic Historic District encompasses the civic and commercial heart of Suncook, New Hampshire, a village on the Suncook River in Pembroke and Allenstown. The civic district is a 3-acre (1.2 ha) area on the Pembroke side of the river, adjacent to the Pembroke Mill, a site that had seen industrial use since the 18th century. The district includes 21 commercial buildings, 19 of which are historically significant. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.The Suncook area was settled in the late 1730s, and small-scale industrial works along the river were an early feature, with a sawmill and gristmill being followed by a fulling mill in the 1700s. The area did not begin to grow substantially until the 1830s, when the first textile mills began to be built there in 1814, although it did benefit from the presence first of ferry services and then bridges, placing the nascent village on major travel routes. Declining agricultural income and rising factory income led to the growth of the commercial center adjacent to the mill complexes that lined the river. In the 1850s the arrival of railroads spurred further growth. By the 1860s Main Street and Glass Street were lined with wood frame commercial buildings.Fires in this area in the 1870s resulted in significant changes to the village. One fire in 1876 destroyed much of Main Street's west side, while a second destroyed much of the east side two years later. The town of Pembroke widened the street, and a significant number of brick buildings were built along Main Street. Many of the buildings in the district were built in the wake of these fires, and exhibit some Italian and Renaissance Revival styling that was popular at that time. The most architecturally interesting is the Clock Tower building at 116 Main Street, which occupies a prominent place overlooking the river, and whose four-story clock tower is the tallest structure in the village.

William Ezra Worthen

William Ezra Worthen (March 14, 1819 – April 2, 1897) was a Harvard educated American civil engineer. He was President of the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1887, and elected an Honorary Member in 1898.

William M. Butterfield

William M. Butterfield (1860–1932) was an American architect from New Hampshire.

Municipalities and communities of Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States
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