Suiko Seamount

Suiko Seamount, also called Suiko Guyot, is a guyot of the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain in the Pacific Ocean.

The name

Suiko Seamount was named by in 1954, and in 1967 the name was approved by the United States Board on Geographic Names. The 33rd Emperor of Japan was Empress Suiko, who reigned from 593 to 628.[1]

Geology

The last eruption from Suiko Seamount occurred 60 million years ago, during the Paleogene Period of the Cenozoic Era.[2][3]

Suiko Seamount rises 4,500 metres (14,800 ft) [1] from the floor of the Pacific, to 951 metres (3,120 ft) from the ocean's surface.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Calgue David A., Dalrymple G. Brent, Greene H. Gary, Wald Donna, KonoMasaru, Kroenke Loren W. "BATHYMETRY OF THE EMPEROR SEAMOUNTS" (PDF). deepseadrilling. Retrieved 1 May 2018.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ Suiko Seamount, North - John Search
  3. ^ Suiko Seamount, Central Region - John Search

Bibliography

  • Jackson, Everett D.; Koizumi, Itaru; Kirkpatrick, R. James; Avdeiko, Gennady; Clague, David; Dalrymple, G. Brent; Karpoff, Anne-Marie; McKenzie, Judith; Butt, Arif; Ling, Hsin Yi; Takayama, Toshiaki; Green, H. Gary; Morgan, Jason; Kono, Masaru (1980). "Site 433: Suiko Seamount" (PDF). Deep Sea Drilling Project Initial Reports. 55: 127–282. doi:10.2973/dsdp.proc.55.106.1980.

Coordinates: 44°35′N 170°20′E / 44.583°N 170.333°E

Koko Guyot

Koko Guyot (also sometimes known as Kinmei and Koko Seamount) is a 48.1-million-year-old guyot, a type of underwater volcano with a flat top, which lies near the southern end of the Emperor seamounts, about 200 km (124 mi) north of the "bend" in the volcanic Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain. Pillow lava has been sampled on the north west flank of Koko Seamount, and the oldest dated lava is 40 million years old. Seismic studies indicate that it is built on a 9 km (6 mi) thick portion of the Pacific Plate. The oldest rock from the north side of Koko Seamount is dated at 52.6 and the south side of Koko at 50.4 million years ago. To the southeast of the bend is Kimmei Seamount at 47.9 million years ago and southeast of it, Daikakuji at 46.7.

List of volcanoes in the Hawaiian – Emperor seamount chain

The Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain is a series of volcanoes and seamounts extending about 6,200 km across the Pacific Ocean. The chain has been produced by the movement of the ocean crust over the Hawaiʻi hotspot, an upwelling of hot rock from the Earth's mantle. As the oceanic crust moves the volcanoes farther away from their source of magma, their eruptions become less frequent and less powerful until they eventually cease to erupt altogether. At that point, erosion of the volcano and subsidence of the seafloor cause the volcano to gradually diminish. As the volcano sinks and erodes, it first becomes an atoll island and then an atoll. Further subsidence causes the volcano to sink below the sea surface, becoming a seamount and/or a guyot. This list documents the most significant volcanoes in the chain, ordered by distance from the hotspot; however, there are many others that have yet to be properly studied.

The chain can be divided into three subsections. The first, the Hawaiian archipelago (also known as the Windward isles), consists of the islands comprising the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi (not to be confused with the island of Hawaiʻi). As it is the closest to the hotspot, this volcanically active region is the youngest part of the chain, with ages ranging from 400,000 years to 5.1 million years. The island of Hawaiʻi is comprised by five volcanoes, of which two (Kilauea and Mauna Loa) are still active. Lōʻihi Seamount continues to grow offshore, and is the only known volcano in the chain in the submarine pre-shield stage.The second part of the chain is composed of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, collectively referred to as the Leeward isles, the constituents of which are between 7.2 and 27.7 million years in age. Erosion has long since overtaken volcanic activity at these islands, and most of them are atolls, atoll islands, and extinct islands. They contain many of the most northerly atolls in the world; one of them, Kure Atoll, is the northern-most atoll in the world.The oldest and most heavily eroded part of the chain are the Emperor seamounts, which are 39 to 85 million years in age. The Emperor and Hawaiian chains are separated by a large L-shaped bend that causes the orientations of the chains to differ by about 60°. This bend was long attributed to a relatively sudden change in the direction of plate motion, but research conducted in 2003 suggests that it was the movement of the hotspot itself that caused the bend. The issue is still currently under debate. All of the volcanoes in this part of the chain have long since subsided below sea level, becoming seamounts and guyots (see also the seamount and guyot stages of Hawaiian volcanism). Many of the volcanoes are named after former emperors of Japan. The seamount chain extends to the West Pacific, and terminates at the Kuril–Kamchatka Trench, a subduction zone at the border of Russia.

Outline of oceanography

The following outline is provided as an overview of and introduction to Oceanography.

Windward
Isles
Leeward
Isles
Emperor
Seamounts
Notable eruptions
and vents
Topics

Languages

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