Subdistrict

A subdistrict is a low-level administrative division of a district.[1]

Usage by country

Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, subdistricts are known as upazilas. They are the third-level and the second lowest-level subdivisions, below divisions and zilas (districts).

Brunei

In Brunei, subdistricts are known as mukims and they are the second-level country subdivision, immediately below districts (daerah). Mukims are subdivided into villages (kampung).

China

In China, a subdistrict (Chinese: 街道; pinyin: jiēdào), literally means "street".

East Timor

In East Timor, a subdistrict is known by the Portuguese word subdistrito.

 India

In India, Census India calls the units below the district (जिला) and they are usually called subdivisions (अनुमंडल), tehsil (sometimes referred C D blocks प्रखंड), (taluk/ taluka / mandal) accordingly administrative divisions of india.

 Indonesia

In Indonesia, subdistrict refers to kelurahan, which has same level with village.

 Israel

In Israel, a subdistrict is known in Hebrew as nefa.

 Palestine

In Palestine, a subdistrict is known in Arabic as qadaa.

 Thailand

In Thailand, the equivalent of a subdistrict is a tambon.

 United Kingdom

In England and Wales, subdistrict was part of a registration district.

Historical usage

Kaza was the Turkish term for subdistricts during the Ottoman Empire

References

  1. ^ "the definition of subdistrict". www.Dictionary.com. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
Acre Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Acre Subdistrict (Arabic: قضاء عكا‎ Qadaa Akka, Hebrew: נפת עכו‎ Nefat Akko) was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located in modern-day northern Israel, having nearly the same territory as the modern-day Acre County. The city of Acre was the district's capital.

Beisan Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Beisan Subdistrict (Arabic: قضاء بيسان‎, Arabic: נפת ביסאן‎) was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Baysan. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the subdistrict disintegrated; most of it became part of Israel, and has been merged with the neighboring Nazareth Subdistrict to from the modern-day Jezre'el County. The southernmost parts, however, fell within the modern-day West Bank - because of that, they were first occupied and unilaterally annexed by Jordan, and were later occupied by Israel following the Six-day War.

Haifa Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Haifa Subdistrict (قضاء حيفا, נפת חיפה) was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It covered the northern Mediterranean coast of regional Palestine, southwestern Galilee, and the Wadi Ara region. It was disintegrated after the British withdrawal from the area. Prior to and during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War around half of the Arab localities were depopulated or destroyed. The entire district was captured by Israel and most of its Arab defenders were composed of the Arab Liberation Army and local militias.

Its predecessor was Haifa Subdistrict, Ottoman Empire.

Hebron Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Hebron Subdistrict was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Hebron. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the subdistrict disintegrated.

Jaffa Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Jaffa Subdistrict was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Jaffa. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the district disintegrated.

Jenin Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Jenin Subdistrict was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Jenin. After the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, the district disintegrated.

Jerusalem Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Jerusalem Subdistrict was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located in and around the city of Jerusalem. After the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, the district was integrated into the Jerusalem District.

List of Arab towns and villages depopulated during the 1948 Palestinian exodus

Around 400 Arab towns and villages were depopulated during the 1948 Palestinian exodus. Some places were entirely destroyed and left uninhabitable; others were left with a few hundred residents and were repopulated by Jewish immigrants, then renamed.

Those areas that became a part of Israel and had at least a partial Arab population consisted of approximately 100 villages and two towns. Arabs remained in small numbers in some of the cities (Haifa, Jaffa and Acre); and Jerusalem was divided between Jordan and Israel. Around 30,000 Palestinians remained in Jerusalem in what became the Arab part of it (East Jerusalem). In addition, some 30,000 non-Jewish refugees relocated to East Jerusalem, while 5,000 Jewish refugees moved from the Old City to West Jerusalem on the Israeli side. An overwhelming number of the Arab residents, and other non-Jews such as Greeks and Armenians, who had lived in the cities that became a part of Israel and were renamed (Acre, Haifa, Safad, Tiberias, Ashkelon, Beersheba, Jaffa and Beisan) fled or were expelled. Most of the Palestinians who remain there are internally displaced people from the villages nearby.There are more than 120 "village memorial books" documenting the history of the depopulated Palestinian villages. These books are based on accounts given by villagers. Rochelle A. Davis has described the authors as seeking "to pass on information about their villages and their values to coming generations".The towns and villages listed below are arranged according to the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine they were situated in.

Maar Dibsah

Maar Dibsah (Arabic: معر دبسة‎) is a Syrian village located in Saraqib Nahiyah in Idlib District, Idlib. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Maar Dibsah had a population of 7074 in the 2004 census.

Nazareth Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Nazareth Subdistrict was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Nazareth. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the district disintegrated; having fallen entirely within Modern-day Israel, it was merged with the Beisan Subdistrict into the Jezre'el County.

Pearl River Delta

The Pearl River Delta Metropolitan Region (PRD, Chinese: 珠江三角洲城市圈; pinyin: Zhūjiāng Sānjiǎozhōu Chéngshìquān) is the low-lying area surrounding the Pearl River estuary, where the Pearl River flows into the South China Sea. It is one of the most densely urbanized regions in the world, and is often considered as a megacity. It is now the wealthiest region in South China and one of the wealthiest in the whole China along with Yangtze River Delta in East China and Jingjinji in North China. The region's economy is referred to as Pearl River Delta Economic Zone, it is also part of the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Greater Bay Area.

The PRD is a megalopolis, with future development into a single mega metropolitan area, yet itself is at the southern end of a larger megalopolis running along the southern coast of China, which include metropolises such as Chaoshan, Zhangzhou-Xiamen, Quanzhou-Putian and Fuzhou. The nine largest cities of the PRD had a combined population of 57.15 million at the end of 2013, comprising 53.69% of the provincial population. According to the World Bank Group, the PRD has become the largest urban area in the world in both size and population.The west side of this region, along with Chaoshan, was also the source of much Chinese emigration from the 19th to the mid 20th centuries, including to the Western world, where they formed many Chinatowns. Today, much of the Chinese diaspora in the US, Canada, Australia, Latin America, and much of Southeast Asia traces their ancestry to the west side of this region. Its dominant language is Cantonese.

Qurqania

Qurqania (Arabic: قورقانيا‎, also spelled Qurqanya or Korkania) is a town in Syria, administratively part of the Harem District of the Idlib Governorate. Qurqania is the administrative center of the Qurqania Subdistrict, which contained 13 localities with a collective population of 12,522 in 2004. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Qurqania itself had a population of 2,050 in the 2004 census.

Safad Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Safad Subdistrict (Arabic: قضاء صفد‎, Hebrew: נפת צפת‎) was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Safad. According to the 1947 Partition Plan, the Subdistrict was to lie entirely in the Jewish State. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the subdistrict, which fell entirely within modern-day Israel, became the modern-day Tzfat County in the Northern District (Israel).

Sahyan

Sahyan (Arabic: صهيان‎) is a Syrian village located in Hish Nahiyah in Maarrat al-Nu'man District, Idlib. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Sahyan had a population of 241 in the 2004 census.

Sheikh Idris

Sheikh Idris (Arabic: شيخ ادريس‎) is a Syrian village located in Saraqib Nahiyah in Idlib District, Idlib. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Sheikh Idris had a population of 3881 in the 2004 census.

Subdistricts of China

The subdistrict (Chinese: 街道 / 街; pinyin: jiēdào / jiē, literally "Street") is one of the smaller political divisions of China. It is a form of township-level division which is typically part of a larger urban area, as opposed to a discrete town surrounded by rural areas, or a rural township known as a xiang (乡).

In general, urban areas are divided into subdistricts, and a subdistrict is sub-divided into several residential communities or neighbourhoods as well as into villagers' groups (居民区/居住区,小区/社区,村民小组).

The subdistrict's administrative agency is the subdistrict office (Chinese: 街道办事处; pinyin: jīedào bànshìchù) or simply the jiedao ban (街道办,jiēdào bàn). Because of the influence of the literal meaning of the Chinese word for 'subdistrict' (street [街道, jiedao]), the term is prone to alternative translations like 'street community'.

Tambon

Tambon (Thai: ตำบล, pronounced [tām.bōn]) is a local governmental unit in Thailand. Below district (amphoe) and province (changwat), they form the third administrative subdivision level. As of 2016 there were 7,255 tambons, not including the 180 khwaeng of Bangkok, which are set at the same administrative level, thus every district contains eight to ten tambon. Tambon is usually translated as "township" or "subdistrict" in English — the latter is the recommended translation, though also often used for king amphoe, the designation for a subdistrict acting as a branch (Thai: king) of the parent district. Tambon are further subdivided into 69,307 villages (muban), about ten per tambon. Tambon within cities or towns are not subdivided into villages, but may have less formal communities called chumchon (ชุมชน) that may be formed into community associations.

Tulkarm Subdistrict, Mandatory Palestine

The Tulkarm Subdistrict was one of the subdistricts of Mandatory Palestine. It was located around the city of Tulkarm. After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the subdistrict disintegrated, the western part became part of the Central District of Israel and the eastern part, became a part of the Jordanian annexation of the West Bank from 1948 to 1967). Most of the eastern part is today the Tulkarm Governorate, part of the State of Palestine.

Umm Jalal

Umm Jalal (Arabic: أم جلال‎) is a Syrian village located in Al-Tamanah Nahiyah in Maarrat al-Nu'man District, Idlib. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Umm Jalal had a population of 2641 in the 2004 census.

Designations for types of administrative territorial entities

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