Styles Bridges

Henry Styles Bridges (September 9, 1898 – November 26, 1961) was an American teacher, editor, and Republican Party politician from Concord, New Hampshire. He served one term as the 63rd Governor of New Hampshire before a twenty-four-year career in the United States Senate.

Styles Bridges
StylesBridges(R-NH)
Chair of the
Senate Republican Policy Committee
In office
January 3, 1955 – November 26, 1961
LeaderWilliam F. Knowland
Everett Dirksen
Preceded byHomer S. Ferguson
Succeeded byBourke B. Hickenlooper
76th President pro tempore of the United States Senate
In office
January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1955
Preceded byKenneth McKellar
Succeeded byWalter F. George
Chair of the
Senate Appropriations Committee
In office
January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1955
Preceded byKenneth McKellar
Succeeded byCarl Hayden
In office
January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949
Preceded byKenneth McKellar
Succeeded byKenneth McKellar
Senate Minority Leader
In office
January 8, 1952 – January 3, 1953
DeputyLeverett Saltonstall
Preceded byKenneth S. Wherry
Succeeded byLyndon B. Johnson
United States Senator
from New Hampshire
In office
January 3, 1937 – November 26, 1961
Preceded byHenry W. Keyes
Succeeded byMaurice J. Murphy Jr.
Governor of New Hampshire
In office
January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1937
Preceded byJohn Winant
Succeeded byFrancis P. Murphy
Personal details
Born
Henry Styles Bridges

September 9, 1898
Pembroke, Maine, U.S.
DiedNovember 26, 1961 (aged 63)
Concord, New Hampshire, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)
Sally Clement
(m. 1928; her death 1938)

Doloris Thauwald
(m. 1944; his death 1961)
EducationUniversity of Maine, Orono (BA)

Early life and career

Bridges was born in West Pembroke, Maine, the son of Alina Roxanna (Fisher) and Earle Leopold Bridges. He attended the public schools in Maine. Bridges attended the University of Maine at Orono until 1918. From 1918 he held a variety of jobs, including teaching, newspaper editing, business and state government. He was an instructor at Sanderson Academy, Ashfield, Massachusetts from 1918 to 1919. He was a member of the extension staff of the University of New Hampshire at Durham from 1921 until 1922. He was the secretary of the New Hampshire Farm Bureau Federation from 1922 until 1923, and the editor of the Granite Monthly Magazine from 1924 until 1926. Meanwhile, He was the director and secretary of the New Hampshire Investment Corporation from 1924 until 1929. He was then a member of the New Hampshire Public Service Commission from 1930 until 1934.

Political career

Bridges ran for governor of New Hampshire in 1934, and won, becoming the nation's youngest governor at the time, according to John Gunther's book, Inside U.S.A. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1936, and would serve until his death in 1961. In 1937 he retired from the Army Reserve Corps, in which he had served as a lieutenant since 1925. In 1940 he attempted to win the Republican nomination for President; the nomination was eventually won by Wendell Willkie. That same year, Bridges also received two delegates for the Republican vice presidential nomination, which eventually went to Charles L. McNary. Bridges broke his hip on New Year's Eve 1941, and missed several months of the next Senate session.

Bridges was reelected to four subsequent terms in 1942, 1948, 1954, and 1960, but he did not complete his final term due to his death. He became the highest-ranking Republican senator, serving as chairman of the Joint Committee on Foreign Economic Cooperation when the Republicans had control of the Senate from 1947 until 1949, Senate Minority Leader from 1952 until 1953, President pro tempore of the United States Senate when the Republicans had control of it from 1953 until 1955, chairman of the Joint Committee on Inaugural Arrangements for both of the inaugurations of President Dwight Eisenhower, Chairman of the Committee on Appropriations when the Republicans had control of the Senate from 1947–1949 and 1953–1955, and Chairman of the Republican Policy Committee from 1954 until his death.

In the Senate, John Gunther wrote, Bridges was "an aggressive reactionary on most issues...and he is pertinaciously engaged in a continual running fight with the CIO, the Roosevelt family and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics."[1]

Association with Joseph McCarthy

Bridges was a staunch defender of Senator Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin, and was one of only 22 senators, all Republicans, who voted against the censure of McCarthy for his "red scare" communist witch hunts, and for his so-called "lavender scare" tactics aimed at homosexuals in 1954.[2] During the immediate post-war era when the U.S. government was expediting the immigration of Nazi scientists, Bridges was quoted as saying that the U.S. State department – whose Jewish members were heavily questioning the rush to repatriate Nazi scientists – needed a "first-class cyanide fumigating job." [a][3][4]

Blackmail

Bridges was also a key collaborator, with fellow Republican Senators McCarthy and Herman Welker of Idaho in the blackmail of Democratic Wyoming Senator Lester C. Hunt, harassment that led to Senator Hunt's suicide in his Capitol office on June 19, 1954.[5][6] Bridges threatened that if he did not immediately retire from the Senate and agree not to seek reelection, Bridges would see that Hunt's son, Lester Hunt, Jr., who had been arrested for soliciting an undercover policeman, was prosecuted and that his son's homosexuality would be widely publicized. Bridges also threatened Inspector Roy Blick of the Morals Division of the Washington Police Department with the loss of his job for failing to prosecute Hunt Jr.[7][8] A Republican, Edward D. Crippa, was appointed by the Republican acting governor of Wyoming, Clifford Joy Rogers, to fill the vacant seat.[9]

Alex Ross in The New Yorker wrote in 2012 of an event "loosely dramatized in the novel and film Advise & Consent [in which] Senator Lester Hunt, of Wyoming, killed himself after ... Bridges ... threatened to expose Hunt's son as a homosexual".[10]

Death and burial

Bridges died of a heart attack on November 26, 1961, in East Concord and, after a service attended by a thousand people at the State House in Concord, was buried in Pine Grove Cemetery.[11][12]

He was one of the poorest men ever elected governor and still of modest means when elected to the Senate, yet his widow Doloris told then Vice President Lyndon Johnson that her husband had left her "a million dollars in cash".[13] Bridges willed his East Concord home to the state to serve as a residence for New Hampshire's governors. The New Hampshire Governor's Mansion is known as "Bridges House".[14]

The "Styles Bridges Room" in the U.S. Capitol was named in his memory on March 12, 1981.[15] Interstate 93 in New Hampshire, from Concord north to the Vermont state line, is named the Styles Bridges Highway. In December 2012, the Boston Globe called for the state to examine Bridges's role in Senator Lester Hunt’s death and reconsider whether the state should continue to honor Bridges, or rename the highway.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ John Gunther, Inside U.S.A., p. 471
  2. ^ U.S. Senate, roll call vote on Senate Resolution 301, December 2, 1954 - Congressional Record.
  3. ^ Ross, Alex (April 30, 2018). "How American Racism Influenced Hitler". The New Yorker. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  4. ^ Senator Bridges on July 18, 1950, 81st Congress, 1st session, Congressional Record 96, part 8:10490-10492.
  5. ^ James J. Kiepper, Styles Bridges: Yankee Senator (Phoenix Publishing, 2001) ISBN 0-914659-93-6, 145-7
  6. ^ Michael Isikoff (June 21, 2015). "Uniquely Nasty: The blockbuster novel that haunted gay Washington". Yahoo. Retrieved June 19, 2017.
  7. ^ Pearson, Drew (June 22, 1954). "The Washington Merry-Go-Round" (PDF). Detroit Free Press. Detroit, Michigan. p. 16. Archived from the original on February 17, 2012. Retrieved February 28, 2011.
  8. ^ Pearson, Drew (February 21, 1974). Abell, Tyler (ed.). Diaries, 1949-1959. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. p. 325. ISBN 0030014263. OCLC 707040.
  9. ^ "Congressional Quiz". The Free Lance–Star. 70 (176). Fredericksburg, Virginia. Congressional Quarterly. July 28, 1954. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  10. ^ Ross, Alex, "Love on the March", The New Yorker, November 12, 2012. Retrieved November 6, 2012.
  11. ^ "Styles Bridges, Dean of Senate Republicans, Dies At Age 63". Lodi News-Sentinel. November 27, 1961.
  12. ^ Kiepper, Yankee Senator, 231-3
  13. ^ Kiepper, Yankee Senator, 189
  14. ^ Kiepper, Yankee Senator, 240
  15. ^ Kiepper, Yankee Senator, 242-3
  16. ^ "N.H. should reassess legacy of Senator Styles Bridges". Boston Globe. December 29, 2012. Retrieved June 11, 2013.

Footnotes

  1. ^ quote: Mr. President, the matter of the German scientists was very important. The Senator from Michigan [Mr. FERGUSON], the Senator from Nebraska Mr. WHERRY, and many other Senators who were interested in that situation at the time it was being considered, remember what took place. We sat in commmittee and heard a man testify that this individual said he did not care what the program of the President of the United States or of the Cabinet was, that he was going to block the coming into the United States of German scientists. As the result of this attitude on the part of some of our civilians, against the advice of the President and the military authorities, the entry into the United States of a sufficient number of scientists was blocked, and Russia obtained the bulk of them. We obtained only a few.⁋ Let us face the cold, grim, bloody facts. America is in a shooting war. The cold war is over. This may be the opening skirmish of World War III. Americans can honestly face these facts. Americans can be realistic.⁋ Or we can continue to hide our heads in the sand, utter pious hopes for the success of the United Nations under Trygve Lie, who has played the Communist tune, and continue to soften our people with more handouts.⁋ [...] On March 24, 1948, I spoke on the floor of the Senate. I offered a 17-point program to stop Communist aggression. Most of those points are as valid today as they were over 2 years ago.⁋ Today I offer an expanded program based on my original suggestions. I sincerely urge the President of the United States to adopt it as a program for saving the America we know.⁋ [...] Eleventh. Clean out the State Department. This is highly important. The small chance we have to postpone the full-scale encounter with Russia, until we are ready, depends on the skill of our diplomats. For many years our State Department has been infiltrated with men who either have unbelievably poor judgment or whose loyalty is open to serious question. It is not simply a matter of sweeping the front stoop by firing the top officials. It is a matter of a complete housecleaning. President Truman owes it to himself and his country to have the best possible advice on all levels.⁋ The need for the housecleaning can no longer be ignored. In 1939 Stalin ruled 180,000,000 people. Today he rules 800,000,000 people. Our foreign policy of appeasement has resulted in stark disaster. The architects of failure must be swept out of office.⁋ When an Army officer loses a battalion, he is relieved of command, in disgrace. When a naval officer loses his ship or runs it aground in the mud, he is courtmartialed. But when foreign-policy advisers lose a whole continent, they are applauded or even promoted.⁋ Mr. President, I have felt all along that there must be security risks in the State Department. I do not know the extent of these risks or of their disloyalty. Apparently, the Senate is not going to learn much about it as a result of any investigation by this Congress. But obviously, the great bulk of employees in the State Department are loyal Americans. These persons do not pose any security problem.⁋ But I do not like the way the State Department, collectively, thinks. American thinking has never been defensive. American thinking has always been aggressive. Traditionally, our country never has sought merely to keep aggressors quietly appeased. Traditionally, our policy has been to do something about it.⁋ We do not exercise world leadership by “waiting for the dust to settle.” I believe it is essentially un-American to “wait for the situation to clarify.” These phrases mean nothing, except that we do not know what we are doing or what we are trying to do. That is not the way Americans think. Americans are imaginative, forward looking. Americans have ideas. Americans get things done. America should embark on a diplomatic offensive to cut the ground out from under Communist diplomacy.⁋ The State Department needs a real house cleanihg. This is not a job of sweeping the dust under the rug with a whisk broom, or airing out the house by opening the front door and sweeping the front steps. This job calls for yellow soap, a scrubbing brush, and plenty of elbow grease, from the basement to the attic. It should be finished off with a first-class cyanide fumigating job.⁋ We can do this for our fighting men in Korea without spending a cent. It could be accomplished long before effective reinforcements get to Korea. It would give our military morale a terrific boost. Let us clean house, Mr. President.

Additional sources

  • McDaniel, Rodger. Dying for Joe McCarthy's Sins: The Suicide of Wyoming Senator Lester Hunt (WordsWorth, 2013), ISBN 978-0983027591

External links

Party political offices
Preceded by
John Winant
Republican nominee for Governor of New Hampshire
1934
Succeeded by
Francis P. Murphy
Preceded by
Henry W. Keyes
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from New Hampshire
(Class 2)

1936, 1942, 1948, 1954, 1960
Succeeded by
Perkins Bass
Preceded by
Kenneth S. Wherry
Senate Republican Leader
1952–1953
Succeeded by
Robert A. Taft
Preceded by
Homer S. Ferguson
Chair of the Senate Republican Policy Committee
1955–1961
Succeeded by
Bourke B. Hickenlooper
Political offices
Preceded by
John Winant
Governor of New Hampshire
1935–1937
Succeeded by
Francis P. Murphy
Preceded by
Kenneth McKellar
President pro tempore of the U.S. Senate
1953–1955
Succeeded by
Walter F. George
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Henry W. Keyes
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from New Hampshire
1937–1961
Served alongside: Fred H. Brown, Charles W. Tobey, Robert W. Upton, Norris Cotton
Succeeded by
Maurice J. Murphy Jr.
Preceded by
Kenneth McKellar
Chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee
1947–1949
Succeeded by
Kenneth McKellar
New office Chair of the Joint Foreign Economic Cooperation Committee
1948–1949
Succeeded by
Pat McCarran
Preceded by
Kenneth S. Wherry
Senate Minority Leader
1952–1953
Succeeded by
Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded by
Carl Hayden
Chair of the Joint Inaugural Ceremonies Committee
1952–1957
Succeeded by
John Sparkman
Preceded by
Kenneth McKellar
Chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee
1953–1955
Succeeded by
Carl Hayden
Bridges (surname)

Bridges is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alan Bridges (1927–2013), English film and television director

Alexander Bridges, English footballer

Angelica Bridges (born 1970), American actress, model and singer

Barry Bridges (born 1941), English footballer

Beau Bridges (born 1941), American actor

Bill Bridges (basketball) (1939–2015), American basketball player

Bles Bridges (1947–2000), South African singer

Calvin Bridges (1889–1938), American geneticist

Charles Scott Bridges (1903–1961), American businessman

Edward Ettingdene Bridges, 1st Baron Bridges (1892–1969), British civil servant and Cabinet Secretary

Elisa Bridges (1973–2002), American model and actress

Frank Bridges (1890–1970), American college sports coach

Frank M. Bridges (1834–1885), American politician

Garey Bridges (born 1969), British actor

George Bridges (disambiguation), multiple people

George Washington Bridges (1825–1873), American politician

George Wilson Bridges (1788–1863), writer, photographer and Anglican cleric

Harry Bridges (1901–1990), American labor leader

Hedley Francis Gregory Bridges (1902–1947), Canadian politician

Henry Bridges (1697–1754), architect and clockmaker

Jeff Bridges (born 1949), American actor

John Bridges (disambiguation), multiple people

Jordan Bridges (born 1973), American actor

Lloyd Bridges (1913–1998), American actor

Lucas Bridges (1874–1949), Anglo-Argentine author and explorer

Ludacris (born 1977), Rapper born Christopher Bridges

Marilyn Bridges (born 1948), American photographer

Mark Bridges (disambiguation), multiple people

Michael Bridges (born 1978), English footballer

Michelle Bridges (born 1970), Australian personal trainer, author & TV personality

Penny Bae Bridges (born 1990), American actress

Robert Bridges (1844–1930), English Poet Laureate

Robert Bridges (critic) (1858–1941), American editor and author

Rocky Bridges (1927–2015), American baseball player

Roy D. Bridges Jr. (born 1943), American astronaut

Ruby Bridges (born 1954), American activist

Rutt Bridges, American geophysicist and politician

Stephen Bridges (born 1960), British ambassador to Cambodia 2000–2005

Steve Bridges (1963–2012), American comedian, impressionist and actor

Styles Bridges (1898–1961), American politician

Thomas Bridges (disambiguation), multiple people

Todd Bridges (born 1965), American actor

William Bridges (disambiguation), multiple peopleGiven name unknownBridges (cricketer, born 1790s), English cricketer with Cambridge Town Club

Bridges (cricketer, born 1780s), English cricketer with Homerton Cricket Club

Charles W. Tobey

Charles William Tobey (July 22, 1880 – July 24, 1953) was an American politician, who was a Governor of New Hampshire and a United States senator.

Doloris Bridges

Doloris Bridges (ca. 1916 – January 16, 1969), widow of 25-year U.S. Senator H. Styles Bridges, was the first woman to seek election to the U.S. Senate from New Hampshire. Considered an example of staunchly anti-communist women who emerged as leaders during the Goldwater era of the Republican Party in the mid-1960s, she died of cancer before the decade was over, without ever winning office.

Electoral history of Herbert Hoover

Electoral history of Herbert Hoover, 31st President of the United States (1929–1933) and 3rd United States Secretary of Commerce (1921–1928).

1920 Democratic presidential primaries:

Unpledged delegates - 165,460 (29.85%)

A. Mitchell Palmer - 91,543 (16.51%)

James M. Cox - 86,194 (15.55%)

William McAdoo - 74,987 (13.53%)

Gilbert M. Hitchcock - 37,452 (6.76%)

Edward I. Edwards - 28,470 (5.14%)

Herbert Hoover - 28,042 (5.06%)

William Jennings Bryan - 20,893 (3.77%)

Robert G. Ross - 13,179 (2.38%)

James W. Gerard - 4,706 (0.85%)1920 Republican presidential primaries:

Hiram W. Johnson - 965,651 (30.30%)

Leonard Wood - 710,863 (22.30%)

Frank O. Lowden - 389,127 (12.21%)

Herbert Hoover - 303,815 (9.53%)

Unpledged delegates - 298,109 (9.35%)

Edward R. Wood - 257,841 (8.09%)

Warren G. Harding - 144,762 (4.54%)

John J. Pershing - 45,640 (1.43%)

Howard Sutherland - 33,849 (1.06%)1920 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):

1928 Republican presidential primaries:

Herbert Hoover - 2,045,928 (49.73%)

Frank O. Lowden - 1,317,799 (32.03%)

George W. Norris - 259,548 (6.31%)

James Eli Watson - 228,795 (5.56%)

Guy D. Goff - 128,429 (3.12%)

Frank B. Willis - 84,461 (2.05%)

Calvin Coolidge (inc.) - 12,985 (0.32%)

Charles G. Dawes - 12,297 (0.30%)1928 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):

Herbert Hoover - 837 (76.86%)

Frank O. Lowden - 74 (6.80%)

Charles Curtis - 64 (5.88%)

James Eli Watson - 45 (4.13%)

George W. Norris - 24 (2.20%)

Guy D. Goff - 18 (1.65%)

Calvin Coolidge (inc.) - 17 (1.56%)

Blank - 5 (0.46%)

Charles G. Dawes - 4 (0.37%)

Charles Evans Hughes - 1 (0.09%)United States presidential election, 1928:

Herbert Hoover/Charles Curtis (R) - 21,427,123 (58.2%) and 444 electoral votes (40 states carried)

Al Smith/Joseph Taylor Robinson (D) - 15,015,464 (40.8%) and 87 electoral votes (8 states carried)

Norman Thomas/James H. Maurer (Socialist) - 267,478 (0.7%)

William Z. Foster/Benjamin Gitlow (Communist) - 48,551 (0.1%)

Others - 48,396 (0.1%)1932 Republican presidential primaries:

Joseph I. France - 1,137,948 (47.50%)

Herbert Hoover (incumbent) - 861,602 (35.96%)

George W. Norris - 139,514 (5.82%)

Jacob S. Coxey - 100,844 (4.21%)

Hiram W. Johnson - 64,464 (2.69%)

Olin J. Ross - 48,867 (2.04%)

Unpledged delegates - 1,236 (0.05%)

Others - 6,126 (0.26%)1932 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):

Herbert Hoover (incumbent) - 1,127 (97.92%)

John J. Blaine - 13 (1.13%)

Calvin Coolidge - 5 (0.43%)

Joseph I. France - 4 (0.35%)

Charles W. Dawes - 1 (0.09%)

James W. Wadsworth - 1 (0.09%)United States presidential election, 1932

Franklin D. Roosevelt/John Nance Garner (D) - 22,821,277 (57.4%) and 472 electoral votes (42 states carried)

Herbert Hoover/Charles Curtis (R) (inc.) - 15,761,254 (39.7%) and 59 electoral votes (6 states carried)

Norman Thomas/James H. Maurer (Socialist) - 884,885 (2.2%)

William Z. Foster/James H. Ford (Communist) - 103,307 (0.3%)

William D. Upshaw/Frank S. Regan (Prohibition) - 81,905 (0.2%)

William Hope Harvey/Frank Hemenway (Liberty) - 53,425 (0.1%)

Verne L. Reynolds/J.W. Aiken (Socialist Labor) - 33,276 (0.1%)

Others - 12,569 (0.1%)1936 Republican presidential primaries:

William E. Borah - 1,478,676 (44.48%)

Alf Landon - 729,908 (21.96%)

Frank Knox - 527,054 (15.85%)

Earl Warren - 350,917 (10.56%)

Stephen A. Day - 155,732 (4.69%)

Warren E. Green - 44,518 (1.34%)

Leo J. Chassee - 18,986 (0.57%)

Herbert Hoover - 7,750 (0.23%)1940 Republican presidential primaries

Thomas E. Dewey - 1,605,754 (49.76%)

Jerrold L. Seawell - 538,112 (16.68%)

Robert A. Taft - 516,428 (16.00%)

Unpledged - 186,157 (5.77%)

Charles L. McNary - 133,488 (4.14%)

R. N. Davis - 106,123 (3.29%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 100,651 (3.12%)

Wendell Willkie - 21,140 (0.66%)

Franklin D. Roosevelt (inc.) - 9,496 (0.29%)

Arthur H. James - 8,172 (0.25%)

Herbert Hoover - 1,082 (0.03%)

John W. Bricker - 188 (0.01%)1940 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):First ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 360

Robert A. Taft - 189

Wendell Willkie - 105

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 76

Arthur H. James - 74

Joseph William Martin - 44

Scattering - 40

Hanford MacNider - 34

Frank E. Gannett - 33

Styles Bridges - 28

Herbert Hoover - 17Second ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 338

Robert A. Taft - 203

Wendell Willkie - 171

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 73

Arthur H. James - 66

Hanford MacNider - 34

Frank E. Gannett - 30

Scattering - 29

Joseph William Martin - 26

Herbert Hoover - 21

Styled Bridges - 9Third ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 315

Wendell Willkie - 259

Robert A. Taft - 212

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 72

Arthur H. James - 59

Herbert Hoover - 32

Hanford McNider - 28

Frank E. Gannett - 11

Scattering - 11

Styles Bridges - 1Fourth ballot:

Wendell Willkie - 306

Robert A. Taft - 254

Thomas E. Dewey - 250

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 61

Arthur H. James - 56

Herbert Hoover - 31

Scattering - 11

Frank E. Gannett - 4

Styles Bridges - 1Fifth ballot:

Wendell Willkie - 429

Robert A. Taft - 377

Arthur H. James - 59

Thomas E. Dewey - 57

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 42

Herbert Hoover - 20

Scattering - 11

Handorf MacNider - 4

Frank E. Gannett - 1Sixth ballot (before shifts):

Wendell Willkie - 655

Robert A. Taft - 318

Thomas E. Dewey - 11

Herbert Hoover - 10

Scattering - 5

Frank E. Gannett - 1

Electoral history of Robert Taft

Electoral history of Robert A. Taft, United States Senator from Ohio (1939–1953), United States Senate Majority Leader (1953) and a candidate for 1940, 1948 and 1952 Republican presidential nominations

Senator Taft was a longtime leader of conservative wing of the Republican Party, as well as co-leader of so-called Conservative coalition, which dominated United States Congress for decades

United States Senate election in Ohio, 1938:

Robert Taft (R) - 1,255,414 (53.62%)

Robert J. Bulkley (D) (inc.) - 1,085,792 (46.38%)Wisconsin Republican presidential primary, 1940:

Thomas E. Dewey - 70,168 (72.57%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 26,182 (27.08%)

Robert Taft - 341 (0.35%)Pennsylvania Republican presidential primary, 1940:

Thomas E. Dewey - 52,661 (66.68%)

Franklin D. Roosevelt (inc.) - 8,294 (10.50%)

Arthur H. James - 8,172 (10.35%)

Robert Taft - 5,213 (6.60%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 2,384 (3.02%)

Herbert Hoover - 1,082 (1.37%)

Wendell Willkie - 707 (0.90%)

Others - 463 (0.59%)Ohio Republican presidential primary, 1940:

Robert Taft - 510,025 (99.52%)

Thomas E. Dewey (write-in) - 2,059 (0.40%)

John W. Bricker - 188 (0.04%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg (write-in) - 83 (0.02%)

Wendell Willkie - 53 (0.01%)

Others - 53 (0.01%)Oregon Republican presidential primary, 1940:

Charles L. McNary - 133,488 (95.89%)

Thomas E. Dewey - 5,190 (3.73%)

Robert Taft - 254 (0.18%)

Wendell Willkie - 237 (0.17%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 36 (0.03%)New Jersey Republican presidential primary, 1940:

Thomas E. Dewey - 340,734 (93.85%)

Wendell Willkie - 20,143 (5.55%)

Franklin D. Roosevelt - 1,202 (0.33%)

Robert Taft - 595 (0.16%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 168 (0.05%)

Scattering - 90 (0.03%)

Arthur H. James - 81 (0.02%)

Herbert Hoover - 69 (0.02%)All candidates, except Dewey, run as write-in

1940 Republican presidential primaries:

Thomas E. Dewey - 1,605,754 (49.76%)

Jerrold L. Seawell - 538,112 (16.68%)

Robert Taft - 516,428 (16.00%)

Unpledged - 186,157 (5.77%)

Charles L. McNary - 133,488 (4.14%)

R. N. Davis - 106,123 (3.29%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 100,651 (3.12%)

Wendell Willkie - 21,140 (0.66%)

Franklin D. Roosevelt (inc.) - 9,496 (0.29%)

Arthur H. James - 8,172 (0.25%)

Herbert Hoover - 1,082 (0.03%)

John W. Bricker - 188 (0.01%)

Charles Montgomery - 5 (0.00%)

Joseph William Martin, Jr. - 1 (0.00%)1940 Republican National Convention (presidential tally):First ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 360

Robert Taft - 189

Wendell Willkie - 105

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 76

Arthur H. James - 74

Joseph William Martin - 44

Scattering - 40

Hanford MacNider - 34

Frank E. Gannett - 33

Styles Bridges - 28

Herbert Hoover - 17Second ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 338

Robert Taft - 203

Wendell Willkie - 171

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 73

Arthur H. James - 66

Hanford MacNider - 34

Frank E. Gannett - 30

Scattering - 29

Joseph William Martin - 26

Herbert Hoover - 21

Styles Bridges - 9Third ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 315

Wendell Willkie - 259

Robert Taft - 212

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 72

Arthur H. James - 59

Herbert Hoover - 32

Hanford McNider - 28

Frank E. Gannett - 11

Scattering - 11

Styles Bridges - 1Fourth ballot:

Wendell Willkie - 306

Robert Taft - 254

Thomas E. Dewey - 250

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 61

Arthur H. James - 56

Herbert Hoover - 31

Scattering - 11

Frank E. Gannett - 4

Styles Bridges - 1Fifth ballot:

Wendell Willkie - 429

Robert Taft - 377

Arthur H. James - 59

Thomas E. Dewey - 57

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 42

Herbert Hoover - 20

Scattering - 11

Handorf MacNider - 4

Frank E. Gannett - 1Sixth ballot (before shifts):

Wendell Willkie - 655

Robert Taft - 318

Thomas E. Dewey - 11

Herbert Hoover - 10

Scattering - 5

Frank E. Gannett - 1United States Senate election in Ohio, 1944:

Robert Taft (R) (inc.) - 1,500,609 (50.30%)

William G. Pickrel (D) - 1,482,610 (49.70%)Nebraska Republican presidential primary, 1948:

Harold Stassen - 80,979 (43.54%)

Thomas E. Dewey - 64,242 (34.54%)

Robert Taft - 21,608 (11.62%)

Arthur Vandenberg - 9,590 (5.16%)

Douglas MacArthur - 6,893 (3.71%)

Earl Warren - 1,761 (0.95%)

Joseph William Martin, Jr. - 910 (0.49%)

Others - 24 (0.01%)Illinois Republican presidential primary, 1948:

Riley A. Bender - 324,029 (96.90%)

Douglas MacArthur - 6,672 (2.00%)

Harold Stassen - 1,572 (0.47%)

Thomas E. Dewey - 953 (0.29%)

Robert Taft - 705 (0.21%)

Others - 475 (0.14%)All candidate, except Bender, run as write-in

New Jersey Republican presidential primary, 1948:

Thomas E. Dewey - 3,714 (41.38%)

Harold Stassen - 3,123 (34.79%)

Douglas MacArthur - 718 (8.00%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 516 (5.75%)

Robert Taft - 495 (5.52%)

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 288 (3.21%)

Joseph William Martin, Jr. - 64 (0.71%)

Alfred Driscoll - 44 (0.49%)

Earl Warren - 14 (0.16%)Pennsylvania Republican presidential primary, 1948:

Harold Stassen - 81,242 (31.47%)

Thomas E. Dewey - 76,988 (29.82%)

Edward Martin - 45,072 (17.46%)

Douglas MacArthur - 18,254 (7.07%)

Robert Taft - 15,166 (5.88%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 8,818 (3.42%)

Harry S. Truman (inc.) - 4,907 (1.90%)

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 4,726 (1.83%)

Henry A. Wallace - 1,452 (0.56%)

Others - 1,537 (0.60%)All candidates except Martin and Vandenberg, run as write-in

Ohio Republican presidential primary, 1948:

Robert Taft - 426,767 (56.79%)

Harold Stassen - 324,707 (43.21%)1948 Republican presidential primaries:

Earl Warren - 771,295 (26.99%)

Harold Stassen - 627,321 (21.96%)

Robert Taft - 464,741 (16.27%)

Thomas E. Dewey - 330,799 (11.58%)

Riley A. Bender - 324,029 (11.34%)

Douglas MacArthur - 87,839 (3.07%)

Leverett Saltonstall - 72,191 (2.53%)

Herbert E. Hitchcock - 45,463 (1.59%)

Edward Martin - 45,072 (1.58%)

Unpledged - 28,854 (1.01%)

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 18,924 (0.66%)1948 Republican National Convention (presidential tally):First ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 434

Robert Taft - 224

Harold Stassen - 157

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 62

Earl Warren - 59

David H. Green - 56

Alfred Driscoll - 35

Others - 65Second ballot:

Thomas E. Dewey - 515

Robert Taft - 274

Harold Stassen - 149

Arthur H. Vandenberg - 62

Earl Warren - 57

Others - 37United States Senate election in Ohio, 1950:

Robert Taft (R) (inc.) - 1,645,643 (57.54%)

Joseph T. Ferguson (D) - 1,214,459 (42.46%)New Hampshire Republican vice presidential primary, 1952:

Styles Bridges - 6,535 (30.85%)

Harold Stassen - 5,876 (27.74%)

Douglas MacArthur - 4,722 (22.29%)

Earl Warren - 2,148 (10.14%)

Robert Taft - 1,590 (7.51%)

Sherman Adams - 310 (1.46%)All candidates run as write-in

New Hampshire Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 46,661 (50.43%)

Robert Taft - 35,838 (38.73%)

Harold Stassen - 6,574 (7.11%)

Douglas MacArthur (write-in) - 3,227 (3.49%)

William R. Schneider - 230 (0.25%)Minnesota Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Harold Stassen - 129,706 (44.37%)

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 108,692 (37.18%)

Robert Taft - 24,093 (8.24%)

Edward C. Slettedahl - 22,712 (7.77%)

Earl Warren - 5,365 (1.84%)

Douglas MacArthur - 1,369 (0.47%)

Estes Kefauver - 386 (0.13%)All candidates except Stassen and Slettedahl run as write-in

Nebraska Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Robert Taft - 9,357 (36.20%)

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 66,078 (30.15%)

Harold Stassen - 53,238 (24.29%)

Mary E. Kenny - 10,411 (4.75%)

Douglas MacArthur - 7,478 (3.41%)

Earl Warren - 1,872 (0.85%)

Others - 767 (0.35%)Pennsylvania Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 863,785 (73.62%)

Robert Taft* - 178,629 (15.23%)

Harold Stassen - 120,305 (10.25%)

Douglas MacArthur* - 6,028 (0.51%)

Earl Warren - 3,158 (0.27%)

Harry S. Truman* (inc.) - 267 (0.02%)

Others - 1,121 (0.10%)All candidates, except Stassen and Kenny, run as write-in

Wisconsin Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Robert Taft - 315,541 (40.63%)

Earl Warren - 262,271 (33.77%)

Harold Stassen - 169,679 (21.85%)

Grant A. Ritter - 26,208 (3.38%)

Perry J. Stearns - 2,925 (0.38%)Illinois Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Robert Taft - 935,867 (73.56%)

Harold Stassen - 155,041 (12.19%)

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 147,518 (11.59%)

Riley A. Bender - 22,321 (1.75%)

Douglas MacArthur - 7,504 (0.59%)

Earl Warren - 2,841 (0.22%)

Others - 1,229 (0.10%)All candidates, except Taft and Bender, run as write-in

New Jersey Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 390,591 (60.74%)

Robert Taft - 228,916 (35.60%)

Harold Stassen - 23,559 (3.66%)Massachusetts Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 254,898 (68.68%)

Robert Taft - 110,188 (29.69%)

Douglas MacArthur - 2,277 (0.61%)

Earl Warren - 1,538 (0.41%)

Harold Stassen - 1,069 (0.29%)

Estes Kefauver - 417 (0.11%)

Harry S. Truman (inc.) - 98 (0.03%)

Leverett Saltonstall - 77 (0.02%)

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. - 36 (0.01%)

William O. Douglas - 33 (0.01%)

Herbert Hoover - 17 (0.01%)

Thomas E. Dewey - 15 (0.00%)

Paul A. Dever - 14 (0.00%)

Paul H. Douglas - 1 (0.00%)

Others - 442 (0.12%)All candidates run as write-in

Ohio Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Robert Taft - 663,791 (78.79%)

Harold Stassen - 178,739 (21.22%)West Virginia Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Robert Taft - 139,812 (78.52%)

Harold Stassen - 38,251 (21.48%)Oregon Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 172,486 (64.55%)

Earl Warren - 44,034 (16.48%)

Douglas MacArthur - 18,603 (6.96%)

Robert A. Taft - 18,009 (6.74%)

Wayne Morse - 7,105 (2.66%)

Harold Stassen - 6,610 (2.47%)

William R. Schneider - 350 (0.13%)Taft was only write-in candidate in Oregon

South Dakota Republican presidential primary, 1952:

Robert Taft - 64,695 (50.32%)

George T. Mickelson - 63,879 (49.68%)1952 Republican presidential primaries:

Robert Taft - 2,794,736 (35.84%)

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 2,050,708 (26.30%)

Earl Warren - 1,349,036 (17.30%)

Harold Stassen - 881,702 (11.31%)

Thomas H. Werdel - 521,110 (6.68%)

George T. Mickelson - 63,879 (0.82%)

Douglas MacArthur - 44,209 (0.57%)1952 Republican National Convention (presidential tally):

First ballot before shifts:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 595

Robert Taft - 500

Earl Warren - 81

Harold Stassen - 20

Douglas MacArthur - 10Second ballot after shifts:

Dwight D. Eisenhower - 845

Robert Taft - 280

Earl Warren - 77

Douglas MacArthur - 4United States Senate Majority Leader, 1953:

Robert Taft - unamiously

Francis P. Murphy

Francis Parnell Murphy (August 16, 1877 – December 19, 1958) was a manufacturer and politician from Nashua, New Hampshire. He served in the New Hampshire House of Representatives and on the Governor's Council before being twice elected as a Republican Governor.

Murphy supported Roosevelt's New Deal policies and switched to the Democratic Party in an attempt to unseat U.S. Senator Styles Bridges in the 1942 Senate election. He retired from politics to enter the radio broadcasting business and later started the WMUR

radio and television stations in Manchester.

A large flood control project in northern New Hampshire at the headwaters of the Connecticut River is named for him, with Murphy Dam impounding Lake Francis. He was also responsible for one of the first ski area aerial tramways in the United States when the Cannon Mountain tramway was built in Franconia Notch, New Hampshire.

Murphy was the fourth of eight children born to Irish immigrant Roman Catholic parents. His father was a tannery worker and a Civil War veteran.

Murphy graduated from high school in the factory town of Hudson, Massachusetts and secured an entry-level job nailing packing cases for shoes together at a local shoe factory. Murphy worked his way up from this entry position, holding successively more responsible jobs at factories in Newport, Manchester, and Nashua.

During World War I Murphy was chairman of New Hampshire's Committee on Electric Power Supply, and he was a longtime member of the New Hampshire National Guard. In 1922 Murphy and two partners organized the J.F. McElwain Company, a manufacturer of shoes, and in 1925 Murphy served on Governor Winant's military staff with the rank of major. He was elected to the state legislature (1931), and to Governor Winant's Executive Council (1933).

By 1936 Murphy's shoe manufacturing plant had grown to twelve shoe manufacturing plants, and J.F. McElwain Company was the largest employer of labor in New Hampshire. Murphy won the Republican nomination for governor in 1936. Then he won the election in the face of an overwhelming electoral landslide for Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Democrat entering his second of four election victories as president. Even Republican New Hampshire voted (narrowly) for Roosevelt, so much ticket splitting was necessary for Murphy to win. He was reelected to a second term in 1938.

Governor Murphy supported much New Deal legislation, particularly legislation which supported labor rights. He also had the traditional New Hampshire concern for sound budgeting. In order to ease homeowners' tax burdens, he eliminated the state tax on real estate in favor of a new tax on tobacco products. The State House annex was built to bring all state agencies under one roof and improve efficiency. The state got into tourism with the new Cannon Mountain Tramway, and with new State-owned bathing facilities at Hampton Beach. The State Police were established at this time and a statewide system of probation was set up to make law enforcement more efficient.

In 1940, just before he was due to retire as governor, Murphy entered the broadcasting business. He founded Radio Voice of New Hampshire, Inc. and opened WMUR (AM 610, now WGIR in 1941. He made one last effort at political life, campaigning against Styles Bridges for the U.S. Senate seat in 1942. When Murphy lost that election (by 15,000 votes), he returned to his business interests. When television came, he set up WMUR-TV in 1954.

Henry Bridges (disambiguation)

Henry Bridges, architect.

Henry Bridges may also refer to:

Henry Styles Bridges (1898–1961), governor of New Hampshire and U.S. senator

Henry Bridges (musician) (1915–1986), American jazz saxophonist

Henry W. Keyes

Henry Wilder Keyes (pronounced to rhyme with "lies") (May 23, 1863 – June 19, 1938) was a Republican politician from Haverhill, New Hampshire. He served as Governor of New Hampshire and as a United States Senator.

Homer S. Ferguson

Homer Samuel Ferguson (February 25, 1889 – December 17, 1982) was a United States Senator from Michigan. He was born in the Pittsburgh suburb of Harrison City, Pennsylvania to parents Samuel Ferguson (Oct. 1857 in Pennsylvania – 1933) and Margaret Bush (Nov. 1857 in Pennsylvania – 1940).

Inauguration of John F. Kennedy

The inauguration of John F. Kennedy as the 35th President of the United States was held on Friday, January 20, 1961 at the eastern portico of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.. The inauguration marked the commencement of John F. Kennedy's only term as President and of Lyndon B. Johnson's only term as Vice President. Kennedy was assassinated 2 years, 306 days into this term, and Johnson succeeded to the presidency.

Kennedy took office following the November 1960 presidential election, in which he narrowly defeated Richard Nixon, the then–incumbent Vice President. He was the first Catholic to become President, and became the youngest person elected to the office.

His inaugural address encompassed the major themes of his campaign and would define his presidency during a time of economic prosperity, emerging social changes, and diplomatic challenges. This inauguration was the first in which a poet, Robert Frost, participated in the program.

Presidential inaugurations are organized by the Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies. For John F. Kennedy's inauguration, this committee was chaired by Senator John Sparkman, and included Senators Carl Hayden and Styles Bridges, and Representatives Sam Rayburn, John William McCormack, and Charles A. Halleck.

Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies

A Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies is a special committee of the United States Congress formed every four years to manage presidential inaugurations.

A committee has been formed every four years since at least the 1901 inauguration of William McKinley.The members are sitting members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives. Typically, the House members include the Speaker of the House as well as the House majority and minority leaders. The Senate members are drawn from the leadership of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration (previously known by other names). A senator acts as Chairman of the Joint Committee; the chairman is therefore drawn from the party in control of the Senate, which may or may not be the same party as the president-elect's. Membership in the committee gives its members the opportunity to control tickets to the inauguration ceremonies.

Kenneth McKellar (politician)

Kenneth Douglas McKellar (January 29, 1869 – October 25, 1957) was an American politician from Tennessee who served as a United States Representative from 1911 until 1917 and as a United States Senator from 1917 until 1953. A Democrat, he served longer in both houses of Congress than anyone else in Tennessee history, and only a few others in American history have served longer in both houses.

Kenneth S. Wherry

Kenneth Spicer Wherry (February 28, 1892 – November 29, 1951) was an American businessman, attorney, and politician. A member of the Republican Party, he served as a U.S. Senator from Nebraska from 1943 until his death in 1951; he was the minority leader for the last two years.

Maurice J. Murphy Jr.

Maurice J. ("Moe") Murphy Jr. (October 3, 1927 – October 27, 2002) was (for one month) the New Hampshire Attorney General and (for eleven months) an appointed United States Senator.

Born in Dover, New Hampshire, he graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in 1950 and from Boston College Law School in 1953. He was admitted to the bar and commenced the practice of law in Portsmouth in 1955. He served as an enlisted man in the United States Army in 1946 and 1947 and again in 1953 and 1954. He was legal counsel to the New Hampshire Senate in 1957-1958, and administrative assistant to Governor Wesley Powell from 1959 to 1961. After serving as deputy attorney general for several months, Murphy was appointed by Governor Powell as New Hampshire Attorney General, and took office on November 4, 1961. Three weeks later, the longest-serving U.S. Senator, conservative Republican H. Styles Bridges, died in office. On December 7, 1961, Governor Powell appointed Murphy as U.S. Senator, to fill the vacancy until a November 1962 special election. Powell's choice of Murphy was controversial; powerful publisher William Loeb published a front-page editorial in the Manchester Union Leader attacking Powell for passing over the late Senator's widow Doloris Bridges. Many political observers expected that Mrs. Dolores Bridges would be appointed to her husband's seat.Murphy ran in the 1962 election in an effort to keep his seat. However, Murphy was challenged in the primary by Doloris Bridges, Congressman Perkins Bass, and Congressman Chester Merrow. Murphy finished third behind Bass and Mrs. Bridges. Governor Powell, too, was defeated in that primary, and in his election night speech, he referenced Loeb's opposition and added that "I'm paying the penalty for appointing a Catholic to the U.S. Senate."Murphy then resumed the practice of law. He was chairman of the board and general counsel of the Portsmouth (N.H.) Savings Bank from 1968 to 1988. At the time of his death in 2002, he resided in Stratham, New Hampshire. He was interred in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Greenland, New Hampshire.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Merrimack County, New Hampshire

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 88 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 2 National Historic Landmarks.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted April 12, 2019.

New Hampshire Governor's Mansion

The New Hampshire Governor's Mansion, known as "Bridges House", is the official residence of the Governor of New Hampshire and the governor's family. Bridges House, located at 21 Mountain Road in Concord, the capital of New Hampshire, has served as the governor's official residence since 1969. Built in 1836, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 22, 2005.

New Hampshire Route 18

New Hampshire Route 18 is a 20.116-mile-long (32.374 km) state highway in northwestern New Hampshire. It is a local road serving Franconia, Bethlehem, and Littleton, New Hampshire, which I-93 bypasses. Its northern extension, Vermont Route 18, continues northward from the Connecticut River to St. Johnsbury, Vermont. NH 18 closely parallels I-93 for its entire length and has several interchanges with the Interstate highway.

USS Moray (SS-300)

USS Moray (SS-300), a Balao-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the moray, a family of large eels found in crevices of coral reefs in tropical and subtropical oceans.

Moray (SS-300) was laid down 21 April 1943 at Cramp Shipbuilding Co., Philadelphia; launched 14 May 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Styles Bridges, wife of the New Hampshire Senator; and commissioned 26 January 1945, Comdr. Frank L. Barrows in command.

She departed Philadelphia 31 January 1945, arriving New London, Connecticut, 1 February. {The Moray accidentally rammed a coal barge Annapolis; no lives were lost }After shakedown training there and off Newport, Rhode Island, Moray left New London with Carp (SS-338) and Gillette (DE-681) 14 April for Balboa, Panama, C.Z., arriving 25 April. Underway 5 May, Moray arrived Pearl Harbor 21 May for final training, after which she sailed for the Marianas 7 June, arriving Saipan 20 June.

The submarine cleared Saipan 27 June for her first war patrol as the senior unit of a coordinated attack group including Sea Poacher (SS-406), Angler (SS-240), Cero (SS-225), Lapon (SS-260), and Carp (SS-338). Comdr. Barrows in Moray assigned stations when the group reached its patrol area off Tokyo 1 July. The first phase of this patrol centered on lifeguard duty. From 7 July to 9 July Moray's special mission was service as picketboat southeast of Honshū in preparation for 3rd Fleet bombardment. Then she continued lifeguard operations.

By June 1945, successful American submarine operations had made enemy targets almost nonexistent, and lifeguard duty became a vital mission for American submarines. However, Moray did get a chance at some action, when she and Kingfish (SS-234) attacked a convoy off Kinkazan, Honshū, 10 July. Allowing Kingfish to attack first, Moray then moved in to fire six torpedoes, then pulled out to rearm and permit Kingfish a second stab. A few moments later one of Moray's torpedoes hit a whaler "Fumi Maru No.6" {361 GRT}. No other shipping was sighted; on 16 July the patrol was shifted to the Kurile Islands. Moray completed her patrol at Midway 6 August.

On 1 September the submarine sailed for the West Coast, arriving San Francisco, California, 11 September. She then went into deactivation overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard. She decommissioned 12 April 1946 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet in January 1947. She was redesignated an Auxiliary Research Submarine AGSS-300 on 1 December 1962. Moray was struck from the Navy List 1 April 1967 and sunk as a torpedo target, 18 June 1970, off San Clemente, California.

Moray received one battle star for World War II service.

United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

The United States Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over all discretionary spending legislation in the Senate.

The Senate Appropriations Committee is the largest committee in the U.S. Senate, with 31 members in the 115th Congress. Its role is defined by the U.S. Constitution, which requires "appropriations made by law" prior to the expenditure of any money from the Treasury, and is therefore, one of the most powerful committees in the Senate.[1] The committee was first organized on March 6, 1867, when power over appropriations was taken out of the hands of the Finance Committee.[2]The chairman of the Appropriations Committee has enormous power to bring home special projects (sometimes referred to as "pork barrel spending") for his or her state as well as having the final say on other senators' appropriation requests.[3] For example, in fiscal year 2005 per capita federal spending in Alaska, the home state of then-Chairman Ted Stevens, was $12,000, double the national average. Alaska has 11,772 special earmarked projects for a combined cost of $15,780,623,000. This represents about four percent of the overall spending in the $388 billion Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2005 passed by Congress.[4]Because of the power of this committee and the fact that senators represent entire states, not just parts of states, it is considered extremely difficult to unseat a member of this committee at an election - especially if he or she is a subcommittee chair, or "Cardinal". Since 1990, four members of this committee have gone on to serve as Senate Majority Leader for at least one session of Congress: Tom Daschle (committee member August 12, 1991 - December 10, 1999; Senate Majority Leader January 3–20, 2001 and June 6, 2001 - January 3, 2003), Bill Frist (committee member April 17, 1995 - December 29, 2002; Senate Majority Leader January 3, 2003 - January 3, 2007), Harry Reid (committee member August 13, 1989 - December 23, 2006; subcommittee chair March 15, 1991 - December 24, 1994 and June 11, 2001 - December 22, 2002; Senate Majority Leader January 3, 2007 - January 3, 2015), Mitch McConnell; Senate Majority Leader January 3, 2015 – present.

Class 2
Class 3
Democratic Party
Convention
Republican Party
Convention

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.