Stuffy McInnis

John Phalen "Stuffy" McInnis (September 19, 1890 – February 16, 1960) was a first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball.

McInnis gained his nickname as a youngster in the Boston suburban leagues, where his spectacular playing brought shouts of "that's the stuff, kid".

From 1909-27, McInnis played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1909–17), Boston Red Sox (1918–21), Cleveland Indians (1922), Boston Braves (1923–24), Pittsburgh Pirates (1925–26) and Philadelphia Phillies (1927). He batted and threw right-handed.

Stuffy McInnis
Stuffy McInnis
McInnis with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925
First baseman / Manager
Born: September 19, 1890
Gloucester, Massachusetts
Died: February 16, 1960 (aged 69)
Ipswich, Massachusetts
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 12, 1909, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
August 1, 1927, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.307
Hits2,405
Home runs20
Runs batted in1,063
Managerial record51–103
Winning %.331
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Career

In a 19-season career, McInnis posted a .307 batting average with 20 home runs and 1,063 RBI in 2,128 games.

A native of Gloucester, Massachusetts, McInnis broke into baseball with the Philadelphia Athletics as a shortstop in 1909. Two seasons later, he replaced Harry Davis at first base as a member of the famous $100,000 infield, teaming up with second baseman Eddie Collins, third baseman Frank Baker and shortstop Jack Barry. As prices and costs rose in later years the tag seemed low, but at this time the group was higher-price than any.

The Athletics were in their prime, winning the American League pennant in 1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914, and back-to-back World Championships in 1910 and 1911. But after they were swept by the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series, owner Connie Mack asked waivers on three starting pitchers and began to dismantle his team in light of the attempted raids on his stars by the new Federal League. The $100,000 infield broken up after Collins was sold to the White Sox, Baker went to the Yankees, and Barry was sent to the Red Sox. Only McInnis stayed, and he was traded to the Red Sox at the end of the 1917 season.

McInnis was part of the Red Sox in the 1918 World Series. He drove in the only run of Babe Ruth's 1-0 pitching victory over the Chicago Cubs in Game 1 of the Series.

He joined Cleveland for one season in 1922 before going to the National League in 1923. He played with the Braves and Pirates, and also managed the Phillies in 1927, his last year in the majors.

A good contact line drive hitter, McInnis batted over .300 during 12 of his 19 seasons, and in each year from 1910 to 1915. His most productive season came in 1912, when he hit .327, though he batted .368 in 59 games for the Pirates champion team in 1925. Extremely hard to strike out, he fanned only 189 times in 7,822 at-bats and amassed 2,405 hits. In 1921, he struck out only 9 times in 584 at bats.

McInnis also excelled in moving runners ahead with sacrifice hits. His career total of 384 sacrifice hits is third best in MLB history.[1]

McInnis also was an especially solid defensive player. He for decades held major league fielding records for first basemen over one season. In 1921, he played in 152 games with the Red Sox and committed only one error in 1,651 chances for a .9993 mark, and his 1,300 errorless chances, also represented a season mark. Between May 31, 1921, and June 2, 1922, McInnis set a third record with 1,700 chances without an error over the course of 163 games.

On June 25, 2007, Kevin Youkilis played in his 120th consecutive game at first base without an error, breaking the prior Red Sox record set in 1921 by McInnis.[2] In his 205th game without an error on April 27, 2008, Youkilis also established a new major league record for first basemen when he fielded his 1,701st consecutive chance without an error, passing the old mark of 1,700 set by McInnis.[3] His streak was snapped at 238 games (2,002 fielding attempts) on June 7, 2008.[4]

Following his retirement as a player, McInnis coached the Norwich University baseball team from 1931 until 1944 and the Harvard baseball team from 1949-54. He died in Ipswich, Massachusetts, at age 69.

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/SH_career.shtml
  2. ^ "Kevin Youkilis archive". mlb.com and the Boston Herald. 2007-04-04. Retrieved 2007-06-26.
  3. ^ "Rays hand Red Sox fourth straight loss" Archived 2012-03-06 at the Wayback Machine, Cape Cod Online, 4/27/08, accessed 7/30/09
  4. ^ Remme, Mark (6/7/08). "Youk's late error halts streak; Slugger ends longest stretch at first without a miscue in history". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 2008-06-08. Retrieved 6/8/08. Check date values in: |accessdate=, |date= (help)

External links

$100,000 infield

The $100,000 infield was the infield of the Philadelphia Athletics in the early 1910s. The $100,000 infield consisted of first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, shortstop Jack Barry and third baseman Frank Baker. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, the nickname reflects "the purported combined market value of the foursome," which is equivalent to about $2.7 million in 2018.

Baseball historian Bill James rated the 1914 edition of the $100,000 infield the greatest infield of all time, and also ranked the 1912 and 1913 editions in the top five all time. The $100,000 infield helped the Athletics win four American League championships in five years—1910, 1911, 1913 and 1914—and win the World Series in 1910, 1911 and 1913. The group was broken up after losing the 1914 World Series as a result of the financial pressures resulting from the emergence of the Federal League. Two members—Collins and Baker—have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

1910 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1910 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the American League with a record of 102 wins and 48 losses, winning the pennant by 14½ games over the New York Highlanders. The A's then defeated the Chicago Cubs in the 1910 World Series 4 games to 1.

1911 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1911 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The A's finished first in the American League with a record of 101 wins and 50 losses, then went on to defeat the New York Giants in the 1911 World Series, four games to two, for their second straight World Championship.

Starting in 1911, the team was known for its "$100,000 infield", consisting of John "Stuffy" McInnis (first base), Eddie Collins (second base), Jack Barry (shortstop), and Frank "Home Run" Baker (third base) as well as pitchers Eddie Plank and Charles "Chief" Bender.

1913 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1913 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 96 wins and 57 losses. The team then defeated the New York Giants in the 1913 World Series, 4 games to 1.

In 2001, baseball historian Bill James ranked the 1913 incarnation of the Athletics' famous "$100,000 infield" as the best of all time in major league history (first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, third baseman Frank "Home Run" Baker, shortstop Jack Barry).

1914 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1914 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. It involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 99 wins and 53 losses. They went on to face the Boston Braves in the 1914 World Series, which they lost in four straight games.

After the season, Connie Mack sold his best players off to other teams due to his frustration with the Federal League. The A's would then post seven consecutive last place finishes in the American League and would not win another pennant until 1929.

1915 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1915 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. After the team won the American League pennant in 1914, the team dropped all the way to last place with a record of 43 wins and 109 losses.

1917 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1917 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 55 wins and 98 losses.

1918 Boston Red Sox season

The 1918 Boston Red Sox season was the eighteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 51 losses, in a season cut short due to World War I. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Chicago Cubs in the 1918 World Series, which the Red Sox won in six games to capture the franchise's fifth World Series. This would be the last World Series championship for the Red Sox until 2004.

The Red Sox' pitching staff, led by Carl Mays and Bullet Joe Bush, allowed the fewest runs in the league. Babe Ruth was the fourth starter and also spent significant time in the outfield, as he was the best hitter on the team, leading the AL in home runs and slugging percentage.

1919 Boston Red Sox season

The 1919 Boston Red Sox season was the nineteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished sixth in the American League (AL) with a record of 66 wins and 71 losses.

1920 Boston Red Sox season

The 1920 Boston Red Sox season was the 20th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 72 wins and 81 losses.

1921 Boston Red Sox season

The 1921 Boston Red Sox season was the 21st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses.

1927 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1927 Philadelphia Phillies season.

Doc Martin (baseball)

Harold Winthrop Martin (1887–1935) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1908, 1911 and 1912 seasons. He attended Tufts University and played for the Athletics while still a student at Tufts. In 1911, he joined the Athletics after finishing his college semester in June and then returned to college after the end of the World Series, which the Athletics won although Martin did not pitch in the series. The 1912 Reach Guide described him as a "clever young pitcher" and said that the Athletics were "fortunate" in his "gradual development" in their pursuit of the 1911 league championship. As of the beginning of the 1911he was expected to graduate as a doctor in June 1912. He only pitched in two games for the Athletics in 1912 and never played professionally again.Martin played semi-pro baseball prior to 1911 for a team in Rockport, Massachusetts where he was a teammate of future Athletics teammate Stuffy McInnis.

Harry Davis (1900s first baseman)

Harry H. Davis (July 19, 1873 – August 11, 1947) was a Major League Baseball first baseman and right-handed batter who played for the New York Giants (1895–96), Pittsburgh Pirates (1896–98), Louisville Colonels (1898), Washington Senators (1898–99), Philadelphia Athletics (1901–11, 1913–17), and Cleveland Naps (1912).

Davis was born in Philadelphia. He attended Girard College. After having played the 1900 for the minor league Providence Grays, he decided to quite baseball, but Athletics manager Connie Mack made him an offer too large to refuse to return to baseball in 1901 with the Athletics. He led the American League in home runs from 1904 to 1907, one of only five players to have ever led their league for four consecutive seasons. He also hit for the cycle on July 10, 1901.

He led the AL in doubles three times and the NL in triples once.

Davis was the starting first baseman and first captain of manager Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1910. In 1905 he led the American league in home runs, RBI, runs and doubles, and led the Athletics to the 1905 World Series against the New York Giants. He was the starting first baseman for the 1910 World Champions and hit .353 in the 1910 World Series. In 1911, the 37-year-old Davis was replaced at first base by the younger Stuffy McInnis, and Davis played a reserve role for the 1911 World Champions.

Davis managed the 1912 Cleveland Naps, but left with 28 games left in the season and a record of 54–71. He returned to the Athletics as a player, coach and assistant captain in 1913, amassing only 33 plate appearances over the next five seasons combined. He continued as a coach and scout with Mack's Athletics until 1927 and also served as a Philadelphia City Councilman.

Davis died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1947, at the age of 74.

Harvard Crimson baseball

The Harvard Crimson baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball team of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The program has been a member of the Ivy League since the conference officially began sponsoring baseball at the start of the 1993 season. The team plays at Joseph J. O'Donnell Field, located across the Charles River from Harvard's main campus. Bill Decker has been the program's head coach since the 2013 season.

The program has appeared in four College World Series and 14 NCAA Tournaments. It has won five Ivy League Championship Series, eight Rolfe Division titles, 15 EIBL regular season titles, and 12 Ivy League regular season titles.

As of the start of the 2014 Major League Baseball season, 12 former Crimson players have appeared in Major League Baseball.

List of Boston Red Sox team records

The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team based in Boston, Massachusetts. They have competed in the American League (AL) since it was founded in 1901, and in the AL East division since it was formed in 1969. Note that before 1908, the team was known as the Boston Americans. The list below documents players and teams that hold particular club records.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Jake Beckley is the all-time leader in career putouts with 23,743. Cap Anson (22,572), Ed Konetchy (21,378), Eddie Murray (21,265), Charlie Grimm (20,722), and Stuffy McInnis (20,120) are the only other players to record 20,000 career putouts.

McInnis

McInnis is a surname originating from the Isle of Skye. Notable people with the surname include:

David Lee McInnis (born 1973), American actor

Evon McInnis (born 1980), Jamaican cricketer

James McInnis (1855–1917), Prince Edward Island politician

Jan McInnis, American stand-up comedian

Jeff McInnis (born 1974), American basketball player

John K. McInnis (1854–1923), Canadian educator and politician

John McInnis (c. 1880 – 1972), Canadian businessman and politician

John McInnis (1950–2003), Canadian politician

Marty McInnis (born 1970), American ice hockey player

Nadine McInnis, Canadian writer

Scott McInnis (born 1953), American lawyer and politician

Stanley McInnis (1865–1907), Canadian politician

Stuffy McInnis (1890–1960), American baseball player

Putout

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods:

Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout)

Catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out)

Catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play

Catching a third strike (a strikeout)

Catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout)

Being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference

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