Stuart Peach

Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart William Peach, GBE, KCB, ADC, DL (born 22 February 1956) is a senior Royal Air Force officer. After training as a navigator, Peach commanded IX (Bomber) Squadron and then became Deputy Station Commander RAF Bruggen. He was deployed as NATO Air Commander (Forward) in Kosovo in 2000. He went on to be Chief of Defence Intelligence in 2006, Chief of Joint Operations in 2009 and the first Commander of Joint Forces Command in December 2011 before being appointed Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff in May 2013. Peach succeeded General Sir Nick Houghton as Chief of the Defence Staff on 14 July 2016. He succeeded General Petr Pavel as Chairman of the NATO Military Committee on 29 June 2018.

Sir Stuart Peach
Stuart Peach in dress uniform
Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach c.2012
Born22 February 1956 (age 63)
Walsall, Staffordshire, England
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Air Force
Years of service1974 –
RankAir Chief Marshal
Service number5202786A
Commands heldChairman of the NATO Military Committee
Chief of the Defence Staff
Joint Forces Command
Chief of Joint Operations
Chief of Defence Intelligence
Air Warfare Centre
NATO Air Commander (Forward), Kosovo
IX (Bomber) Squadron
Battles/warsOperation Jural
Kosovo
AwardsKnight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire
Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air
Commander First Class of the Order of King Abdulaziz (Saudi Arabia)
Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)
National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal (United States)

Early life and education

Peach was born on 22 February 1956 in Staffordshire, England, to Clifford Peach and Jean Mary Peach.[1] He was educated at Aldridge Grammar School, in Aldridge, Staffordshire.[2] He studied geography, economics, and social history at the University of Sheffield, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in 1977.[1][2] He later studied at Downing College, Cambridge, and completed a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) degree in 1997.[1]

Service career

Tornado GR1 at Fairford 88
A Tornado GR1 in 1988: Peach served as a navigator on this type of aircraft

Peach was appointed an acting pilot officer on 1 September 1974[3] and was commissioned on graduation from university as a substantive pilot officer on 15 July 1977;[4] he was promoted to flying officer on 15 January 1978[5] and to flight lieutenant on 15 October 1978.[6] A navigator, Peach was posted to No. 13 Squadron in 1979[1] and served a tour on the English Electric Canberra in the photographic reconnaissance role before being transferred to IX (Bomber) Squadron in 1982 where he served on the ground attack variant of the Panavia Tornado in the UK.[7] He transferred to No. 31 Squadron in 1984 and served on the Tornado in Germany.[7] Promoted to squadron leader on 1 July 1986,[8] he became a Qualified Weapons Instructor[7] and received the Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air in the 1990 Birthday Honours List.[9]

After Staff College in 1990 he returned to Germany to serve as Personal Staff Officer to, in turn, Deputy Commander RAF Germany, Commander-in-Chief RAF Germany and Commander Second Allied Tactical Air Force (of which RAF Germany formed a part),[7] being promoted to wing commander on 1 July 1991.[10] Peach saw action as a Detachment Commander in Saudi Arabia during Operation Jural.[2] From 1994 to 1996 Peach commanded IX (Bomber) Squadron operating in the Strike, Attack and SEAD role, also acting as Deputy Station Commander RAF Bruggen.[7]

Stuart Peach in 95s
Stuart Peach in MTP Uniform.

Following promotion to group captain on 1 July 1996,[11] Peach became Director Defence Studies (Royal Air Force) in 1997, commissioning scholarship, editing books and writing articles on air power: he secured an MPhil from Downing College, Cambridge at that time.[1] In 1999 he was appointed Assistant Director of the Higher Command and Staff Course at the Joint Services Command and Staff College (having previously graduated from that course).[7]

Peach served as Commander British Forces Italy from 1999 to 2000 and NATO Air Commander (Forward) in Kosovo in 2000,[7] as a result of which he was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire on 6 April 2001.[12] He was then appointed Commandant of the Air Warfare Centre[13] and Assistant Chief of Staff Intelligence[7] at RAF Strike Command, being promoted to air commodore on 1 January 2001.[14]

Promoted to air vice marshal on 1 August 2003,[15] Peach served as Director General Intelligence Collection from July 2003 to March 2006.[7] He was promoted to air marshal on 17 March 2006,[16] and appointed Chief of Defence Intelligence,[17] becoming Chief of Joint Operations in March 2009,[18] having been appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB) in the 2009 New Year Honours List.[19]

Peach was promoted to air chief marshal and appointed the first commander of the new Joint Forces Command in December 2011.[20] He went on to become Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff in May 2013.[21][22] As of 2015, Peach was paid a salary of between £190,000 and £194,999 by the department, making him one of the 328 most highly paid people in the British public sector at that time.[23] He was appointed Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire (GBE) in the 2016 New Year Honours.[24]

On 22 January 2016, the Ministry of Defence announced that Peach would succeed General Sir Nick Houghton as Chief of the Defence Staff in summer 2016.[25][26][27][28] Peach took over on 14 July 2016.[29] He succeeded General Petr Pavel as Chairman of the NATO Military Committee on 29 June 2018.[30]

Family and personal life

Peach married Brigitte Ender in 1986; they have one son and one daughter.[1] He is President of the RAF Rugby League;[2] he is interested in sport, military history and cooking[1] and has an honorary DTech degree from Kingston University[2] and an honorary LittD degree from the University of Sheffield.[31] He is an Honorary Fellow of Downing College, Cambridge.[32]

Works

  • Peach, Stuart (1998). Perspectives on Air Power. The Stationery Office. ISBN 978-0117728882.

Honours and awards

Order of the British Empire (Military) Ribbon.png Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire (GBE) 2016 New Year Honours[24]
Order of the Bath UK ribbon.png Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB) 2009 New Year Honours[19]
Mentioned in Dispatches emblem.png Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air 1990 Birthday Honours[9]
Spange des König-Abdulaziz-Ordens.png Commander First Class of the Order of King Abdulaziz (Saudi Arabia)[33]
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)[33]
NIDRib.gif National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal (United States)[33]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Who's Who 2014, A & C Black, 2010, ISBN 978-1408181195
  2. ^ a b c d e "Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach KCB CBE ADC DL BA MPhil DTech DLitt RAF". Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  3. ^ "No. 46432". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 December 1974. p. 12878.
  4. ^ "No. 47352". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 October 1977. p. 13103.
  5. ^ "No. 47437". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 January 1978. pp. 607–608.
  6. ^ "No. 47670". The London Gazette (Supplement). 23 October 1978. p. 12646.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Air Marshal S W Peach CBE BA MPhil DTech FRAeS" (PDF). Cambridge Conference. 2007. Archived from the original on 8 July 2011. Retrieved 22 January 2016.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  8. ^ "No. 50583". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 June 1986. pp. 8719–8720.
  9. ^ a b "No. 52173". The London Gazette. 15 June 1990. p. 27.
  10. ^ "No. 52591". The London Gazette (Supplement). 1 July 1991. p. 10091.
  11. ^ "No. 54453". The London Gazette. 1 July 1996. p. 8919.
  12. ^ "No. 56168". The London Gazette (Supplement). 6 April 2001. pp. 4244–4245.
  13. ^ "RAF Senior Appointments" (PDF). September 2011. p. 58. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  14. ^ "No. 56078". The London Gazette (Supplement). 2 January 2001. p. 14622.
  15. ^ "No. 57018". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 August 2003. p. 9733.
  16. ^ "No. 57931". The London Gazette (Supplement). 21 March 2006. p. 3968.
  17. ^ "Ministry of Defence and Tri-Service Senior Appointments" (PDF). September 2011. p. 7. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  18. ^ RAF Air Rank Appointments List 04/08 Archived 22 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine retrieved 9 June 2008
  19. ^ a b "No. 58929". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 2008. p. 2.
  20. ^ RAF Air Rank Appointments List 07/11 retrieved 1 December 2011
  21. ^ "New senior military officers appointed". Inside Government. 24 January 2013. Retrieved 24 January 2013.
  22. ^ "New Vice Chief of the Defence Staff". Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  23. ^ "Senior officials 'high earners' salaries as at 30 September 2015 – GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. 17 December 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2016.
  24. ^ a b "No. 61450". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 2015. p. N7.
  25. ^ "Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach appointed new Chief of the Defence Staff". Ministry of Defence. 22 January 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  26. ^ "New Head Of Armed Forces Is Appointed". Sky News. 22 January 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  27. ^ "Senior RAF officer who commanded Britain's intervention in Libya will be next Chief of the Defence Staff". The Daily Telegraph. 22 January 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  28. ^ BBC News (22 January 2016). "Sir Stuart Peach named as new head of UK armed forces". BBC News. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  29. ^ "Sir Stuart Peach". Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 14 July 2016.
  30. ^ "NATO has a new top military adviser". Defence News. 29 June 2018. Retrieved 29 June 2018.
  31. ^ "Honorary Graduates" (PDF). University of Sheffield. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  32. ^ "Honorary Fellows, Downing College, Cambridge". Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  33. ^ a b c "Stuart Peach". Retrieved 6 November 2018.

External links

Media related to Stuart Peach at Wikimedia Commons

Military offices
Preceded by
R J Horwood
Commandant Air Warfare Centre
2000–2003
Succeeded by
Chris Nickols
Preceded by
Michael Laurie
Director General Intelligence Collection
2003–2006
Succeeded by
John Rose
Preceded by
Andrew Ridgway
Chief of Defence Intelligence
2006–2009
Succeeded by
Chris Nickols
Preceded by
Nick Houghton
Chief of Joint Operations
2009–2011
Succeeded by
David Capewell
New title Commander, Joint Forces Command
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Barrons
Preceded by
Sir Nick Houghton
Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff
2013–2016
Succeeded by
Sir Gordon Messenger
Chief of the Defence Staff
2016–2018
Succeeded by
Sir Nick Carter
Preceded by
Petr Pavel
Chairman of the NATO Military Committee
2018–
Incumbent
Aldridge School

Aldridge School is a mixed secondary school and sixth form with academy status located in Aldridge, in the Metropolitan Borough of Walsall in the West Midlands, England. The school is recognised as a Science College. The current head is Ian Bryant.

Anthony Morton

Admiral Sir Anthony Storrs Morton (6 November 1923 – 6 May 2006) was a senior Royal Navy officer and Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff.

Ben Hasselman

General Benjamin Richard Pieter Frans Hasselman (1898–1984) was an officer of the Royal Netherlands Army and chairman of the NATO Military Committee from 1957 to 1958.

Chairman of the NATO Military Committee

The Chairman of the NATO Military Committee (CMC) is the head of the NATO Military Committee, which advises the North Atlantic Council (NAC) on military policy and strategy. He is the senior military spokesman of the 29-nation alliance and principal advisor to the Secretary General. The Chairman is one of the foremost officials of NATO, next to the Secretary General and the Supreme Allied Commander Europe. He is assisted by the Deputy Chairman, who advises the Deputy Secretary General and serves as the principal agent for coordination of nuclear, biological, and chemical matters for the Military Committee.The current Chairman of the NATO Military Committee is Air Chief Marshal Stuart Peach, former Chief of Defence Staff of the British Armed Forces, who took office on 29 June 2018.

Chief of the Defence Staff (United Kingdom)

The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) is the professional head of the British Armed Forces and the most senior uniformed military adviser to the Secretary of State for Defence and the Prime Minister. The Chief of the Defence Staff is based at the Ministry of Defence and works alongside the Permanent Under Secretary, the Ministry's senior civil servant. The Chief of the Defence Staff is the British equivalent position of what in NATO and the European Union is known as the Chief of Defence.

Constitutionally, the Sovereign is the de jure Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces. However, in practice, the British Government de facto exercises the royal prerogative and provides direction of the Armed Forces through the Ministry of Defence's Defence Council of which the Chief of the Defence Staff is a member.

The current Chief of the Defence Staff is General Sir Nick Carter, who succeeded Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach in June 2018. Chiefs of the Defence Staff are appointed on the recommendation of the Secretary of State for Defence to the Prime Minister before being approved by the Queen.

Etienne Baele

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Gordon Messenger

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Joint Forces Command

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List of Honorary Fellows of Downing College, Cambridge

This is a list of Honorary Fellows of Downing College, Cambridge.

Aitzaz Ahsan

Michael Apted

Janet Baker

Martin Baker

Quentin Blake

Colin Blakemore

Alan Bowness

Richard Bowring

Godfrey Bradman

Giles Brindley

Arnold Burgen

John Cardy

Alan Carrington

Stephen Chambers

Lawrence Collins, Baron Collins of Mapesbury

Barry Everitt

Francis Graham-Smith

Alan Howard

David Ingram

Howard Jacobson

P. D. James

Martin Kemp

David King

Kim Lewison

David Lloyd Jones

Peter Mathias

Richard McCombe

Wilfrid Mellers

Keith Murray, Baron Murray of Newhaven

Trevor Nunn

Stuart Peach

John Pendry

David Rees

Brian Vickers

Caroline Wilson

N. T. Wright

List of Royal Air Force air chief marshals

The following is a list of Royal Air Force air chief marshals. The rank of air chief marshal is a four-star officer rank and currently the highest rank to which RAF officers may be promoted to in a professional capacity. Throughout the history of the RAF there have been 140 RAF officers promoted to air chief marshal and at present two RAF officers hold the rank in an active capacity. These are Sir Stephen Hillier, the Chief of the Air Staff (the only dedicated RAF 4-star post) and Sir Stuart Peach who is the Chairman of the NATO Military Committee.

The rank was first used in 1922 when Sir Hugh Trenchard the then Chief of the Air Staff was promoted. Up until the mid-1930s there was usually only one RAF officer in the rank of air chief marshal. During World War II, with the great expansion of the RAF, the number of air chief marshals active at any one time rose to six by the end of the War. This number of air chief marshals was to remain approximately constant throughout the Cold War but after the British defence cuts of the mid-1990s there were only two dedicated 4-star RAF posts, namely the AOC-in-C, Strike Command and the Chief of the Air Staff. In 2007 with the reduction to a single command (Air Command) the RAF initially retained two air chief marshal posts (the AOC-in-C, Air Command and the Chief of the Air Staff) but in 2012 the post of AOC-in-C, Air Command was subsumed within the responsibilities of the Chief of the Air Staff leaving only a single dedicated RAF air chief marshal post.

Lord-Lieutenant of Lincolnshire

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The lord-lieutenancy is now an honorary titular position, usually awarded to a retired notable person in the county. Until 1975, this had been awarded to a peer connected to the county.

NATO Military Committee

The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation Military Committee (NATO MC) is the body of NATO that is composed of member states' Chiefs of Defence (CHOD). These national CHODs are regularly represented in the MC by their permanent Military Representatives (MilRep), who often are two- or three-star flag officers. Like the Council, from time to time the Military Committee also meets at a higher level, namely at the level of Chiefs of Defence, the most senior military officer in each nation's armed forces.

Nick Carter (British Army officer)

General Sir Nicholas Patrick Carter, (born 11 February 1959) is a Kenyan-born senior British Army officer. He served as commanding officer of 2nd Battalion, Royal Green Jackets in which role he was deployed to Bosnia in 1998 and Kosovo in 1999. After service in Afghanistan, he took command of 20th Armoured Brigade in 2004 and commanded British forces in Basra. He was subsequently appointed General Officer Commanding 6th Division, which was deployed to Afghanistan with Carter as Commander ISAF Regional Command South, before he became Director-General Land Warfare. After that he became Deputy Commander Land Forces in which role he was the main architect of the Army 2020 concept. Following a tour as Deputy Commander, International Security Assistance Force, he assumed the position of Commander Land Forces in November 2013. In September 2014, he became head of the British Army as Chief of the General Staff succeeding General Sir Peter Wall. In June 2018 he succeeded Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach as Chief of the Defence Staff.

Nick Houghton

General John Nicholas Reynolds Houghton, Baron Houghton of Richmond, (born 18 October 1954) is a retired senior British Army officer and former Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) of the British Armed Forces. He was appointed CDS in July 2013, following the retirement of General Sir David Richards. He served as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, the Green Howards in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and later became Commander of the 39th Infantry Brigade in Northern Ireland. He deployed as Senior British Military Representative and Deputy Commanding General, Multi-National Force – Iraq during the Iraq War. Later, he became Chief of Joint Operations at Permanent Joint Headquarters and served as Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff until assuming the position of CDS. Houghton retired from the British Army in July 2016, and was succeeded as CDS by Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach.

Peter Herbert (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir Peter Geoffrey Marshall Herbert, (28 February 1929 – 3 May 2019) was a senior Royal Navy officer and former Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff.

Petr Pavel

General Petr Pavel (born 1 November 1961) is a Czech army officer who served from 2015 to 2018 as the Chairman of the NATO Military Committee. He is the first person from a former Eastern Bloc state and the first former communist to hold the position. Prior to his current role he was Chief of the General Staff of the Czech Army from 1 July 2012 to 1 May 2015.

Richard Vincent, Baron Vincent of Coleshill

Field Marshal Richard Frederick Vincent, Baron Vincent of Coleshill, (23 August 1931 – 8 September 2018) was a British Army officer. After serving with British Army of the Rhine he served with the Commonwealth Brigade in Malaysia during the Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation. He commanded 12th Light Air Defence Regiment in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, and later commanded 19th Airportable Brigade. Although he never served as one of the individual service heads, he went on to be Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff in the late 1980s and then Chief of the Defence Staff in the aftermath of the Gulf War. He subsequently became Chair of the Military Committee of NATO in the mid-1990s.

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Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff (United Kingdom)

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