Stresemann's bird-of-paradise

Stresemann's bird-of-paradise is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is an intergeneric hybrid between a Queen Carola's parotia and greater lophorina.

Stresemann's bird-of-paradise
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Superfamily: Corvoidea
Family: Paradisaeidae
Hybrid: Parotia carolae × Lophorina superba
Synonyms

History

Only one female specimen is known of this hybrid, held in the Berlin Natural History Museum, coming from Mount Hunstein in the Sepik district of north-eastern New Guinea. It was first identified as a female Carola's Parotia in 1923 and later, in 1934, described as a subspecies of the Superb Bird of Paradise; it is named for its original identifier and later describer, German ornithologist Erwin Stresemann.[1]

Notes

  1. ^ Frith & Beehler (1998), pp.514-515.

References

  • Frith, Clifford B. & Beehler, Bruce M. (1998). The Birds of Paradise. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-854853-9.
Astrapia

The astrapias are a genus, Astrapia, of birds-of-paradise. The genus contains five species.

They are endemic to New Guinea. The males have highly iridescent plumage and remarkably long tails. Females are duller and have shorter tails.

Barnes's astrapia is a hybrid produced by the interbreeding of Princess Stephanie's astrapia and the ribbon-tailed astrapia.

Astrapian sicklebill

The astrapian sicklebill, also known as the green-breasted riflebird, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that believed to be an intergeneric hybrid between an Arfak astrapia and black sicklebill. This explanation was proposed by Erwin Stresemann who used the same explanation for the Elliot's bird-of-paradise. The two forms are substantially different and the latter's validity is still under question.

Bensbach's bird-of-paradise

Bensbach's bird-of-paradise, also known as Bensbach's riflebird , is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is often now considered an intergeneric hybrid between a magnificent riflebird and lesser bird-of-paradise. However, some authors, such as Errol Fuller, believe that it was a distinct and possibly extinct species.

Drepanornis

Drepanornis is a genus of bird-of-paradise found in forests of New Guinea. They have long decurved sickle-like bills and an overall brown plumage.The genus is sometimes considered a subgenus of Epimachus, but the two members of Drepanornis have a far shorter tail and their sexual dimorphism is less extreme.

Duivenbode's bird-of-paradise

Duivenbode's bird-of-paradise is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is a hybrid between the emperor bird-of-paradise and lesser bird-of-paradise. The common name commemorates Maarten Dirk van Renesse van Duivenbode (1804–1878), Dutch trader of naturalia on Ternate.

Duivenbode's riflebird

Duivenbode's riflebird is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is a presumed intergeneric hybrid between a magnificent riflebird and lesser lophorina. The common name commemorates Maarten Dirk van Renesse van Duivenbode (1804-1878), Dutch trader of naturalia on Ternate.

Epimachus

Epimachus is a genus of bird-of-paradise from highland forests in New Guinea. They have long decurved sickle-like bills and long tails. Males of both species have extensive iridescent blackish to their plumage, while females are overall brown with barred underparts.

The two members of the genus Drepanornis are sometimes included in Epimachus, but their tail is far shorter and their sexual dimorphism is less extreme.

False-lobed astrapia

The false-lobed astrapia, also known as the false-lobed long-tail, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is a presumed intergeneric hybrid between a long-tailed paradigalla and black sicklebill. Another interpretation that has been put forward is that the only known specimen is an immature Elliot's bird-of-paradise.

Gilliard's bird-of-paradise

Gilliard's bird-of-paradise is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is a hybrid between a raggiana bird-of-paradise and lesser bird-of-paradise. It is known from adult male specimens taken in the upper Baiyer Valley in Papua New Guinea. It was named after American ornithologist Ernest Thomas Gilliard by Clifford Frith and Bruce Beehler.

List of hybrid birds-of-paradise

Hybrid birds of paradise may occur when individuals of different species, that look similar and have overlapping ranges, confuse each other for their own species and crossbreed.

Erwin Stresemann hypothesised that hybridisation among birds-of-paradise might explain why so many of the described species were so rare. Stresemann examinined many controversial specimens and, during the 1920s and 1930s, he published several papers on his hypothesis. Many of the species described in the late 19th and early 20th centuries are now generally considered to be hybrids, though some are still subject to dispute; their status is unlikely to be settled definitely without genetic examination of museum specimens.

Mantou's riflebird

Mantou's riflebird, also known as Bruijn's riflebird, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is presumed to be an intergeneric hybrid between a twelve-wired bird-of-paradise and magnificent riflebird.

Manucode

Manucodes are birds-of-paradise in the genus Manucodia, that are medium-sized with black-glossed purple and green plumages.

The members of this genus are distributed in the lowland forests of New Guinea and nearby islands. They are monogamous and sexually monomorphic, in contrast to most birds-of-paradise.

The name Manucodia is derived from Javanese "manuk dewata"; "manuk" means bird and "dewata" means gods.

Mysterious bird of Bobairo

The mysterious bird of Bobairo, named as such by Errol Fuller, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is presumed to be an intergeneric hybrid between a black sicklebill and greater lophorina. Only one adult male specimen is known of this bird, and is held in the Netherlands National Museum of Natural History in Leiden. It derives from Bobairo, near Enarotali on Lake Paniai in the Weyland Mountains of Western New Guinea.

Paradigalla

The genus Paradigalla consists of two species of birds-of-paradise. Both are medium-sized black birds with blue and yellow facial wattles.

The name of the genus is derived from two words, the Paradisaea and Gallus, the junglefowl of pheasant family. The two paradigallas and the four junglefowls exhibits facial wattles.

Ruys's bird-of-paradise

Ruys's bird-of-paradise is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is presumed to be an intergeneric hybrid between a magnificent bird-of-paradise and lesser bird-of-paradise.

Schodde's bird-of-paradise

Schodde's bird of paradise is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is an intergeneric hybrid between a Lawes's parotia and blue bird-of-paradise.

Sharpe's lobe-billed parotia

Sharpe's lobe-billed parotia, also known as Sharpe's lobe-billed riflebird, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is an intergeneric hybrid between a long-tailed paradigalla and western parotia.

Wilhelmina's bird-of-paradise

Wilhelmina's bird-of-paradise, also known as Wilhelmina's riflebird, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is presumed to be an intergeneric hybrid between a greater lophorina and magnificent bird-of-paradise.

Wonderful bird-of-paradise

The wonderful bird-of-paradise, also known as Reichenow's riflebird, is a bird in the family Paradisaeidae that is an intergeneric hybrid between a twelve-wired bird-of-paradise and lesser bird-of-paradise.

Birds-of-paradise (family: Paradisaeidae)

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