Street football

The terms street football and street soccer (in United States) encompass a number of informal varieties of association football. These informal pick up games do not necessarily follow the requirements of a formal game of football, such as a large field, field markings, goal apparatus and corner flags, eleven players per team, or match officials (referee and assistant referees).[1][2]

Paolo Monti - Serie fotografica (Venezia, 1960) - BEIC 6328452
Street football, Venice (1960)

Background

Tripoli Libya Flyover
Street football in Libya

Street football is more similar to beach football and futsal than to association football. Often the most basic of set-ups will involve just a ball with a wall or fence used as a goal, or items such as clothing being used for goalposts[1][3] (hence the phrase "jumpers for goalposts"). The phrase was used by Ed Sheeran in his 2015 documentary Jumpers for Goalposts: Live at Wembley Stadium as a nod to playing the concerts at Wembley Stadium, the home of English football.[4] The ease of playing these informal games on the streets and open spaces make football the most popular sport in the world.[5]

Currently several common street football organisations exist (Streetfootballworld, SISM Street Soccer in the USA, The International Street Soccer Association, WhizzKids United, Buntkicktgut, Street Soccer USA). Nowadays, street football is also one method for coaching young football players[6] and is realized with freestyle football, which has grown in popularity since the early 2000s when Nike began to focus on street football and freestyle via their TV ads.[7][8]

The first Street Football World Championship took place in the Mariannenplatz in Berlin-Kreuzberg.[9] The World Street 3s, the first international World Street Soccer Championships took place in Manchester on 25 September 2016.[10]

The United States held their first international tournament in 2014. The American Panna & Freestyle Tournament hosted by SISM Street Soccer, took place in San Jose, California. The inaugural event consisted of freestyle football, street soccer and panna. The event drew many top professionals from around the world to judge and compete in the Bay Area. [11]

Video games

In 2005, video game publisher Electronic Arts introduced FIFA Street, a franchise based on street football and freestyle football. FIFA Street series focuses on flair, style and trickery, reflecting the cultures of street football and freestyle football played in streets and backlots across the world.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Meseguer, Pedro (November 7, 2016). "El fútbol callejero" (in Spanish). Alicante: Futbol Jobs. Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  2. ^ "Fútbol Callejero: Historia, trucos, jugadas y mucho más" (in Spanish). Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  3. ^ Kummetz, Pablo (October 19, 2004). "Fútbol callejero para la integración social" (in Spanish). Berlin: Deutsche Welle. Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  4. ^ "Watch the trailer for Ed Sheeran's exuberant concert film 'Jumpers for Goalposts'". USA Today. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  5. ^ "Street Soccer" (PDF). Retrieved April 21, 2019. Soccer is the undisputed # 1 game in the world and the primary way kids around the world developed their ball skills was through “street soccer”. World-class players came out of this environment.
  6. ^ Modern Sports Stories Publication, published 09/09/2013. Staff interview with Darren Laver, Page 96.
  7. ^ "UK's and World's Best Football Freestyle Agency". www.ukfootballfreestyle.co.uk. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  8. ^ "Welcome". World Class Freestyle - Freestyle Football Event Hire - Search Freestylers by Location - #1 Freestyle Soccer agency. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  9. ^ ‹See Tfd›(in English) ‹See Tfd›(in German) Street Football World Festival 2006 Archived 2007-01-22 at the Wayback Machine not in reference
  10. ^ "NETHERLANDS WIN THE FIRST WORLD STREET 3s CHAMPIONSHIP – World Street 3s". www.worldstreet3s.com. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  11. ^ "History of American Panna & Freestyle Tournament". SISM Street Soccer. Retrieved 31 January 2018.
Allan Nielsen

Allan Nielsen (born 13 March 1971) is a Danish former professional football player whose most notable period of football was four years at English Premier League club Tottenham Hotspur with whom he won the 1999 League Cup, scoring the winning goal.

He was also an integral part of the Denmark national football team from 1996 to 2001, playing a total of 44 matches and scoring seven goals. He competed for Denmark in the international 1996 European Championship (Euro 1996), 1998 FIFA World Cup and Euro 2000 tournaments.

Andover New Street F.C.

Andover New Street Football Club is a football club based in Andover, Hampshire, England. Affiliated to the Hampshire Football Association, they are currently members of the Wessex League Division One and play at Foxcotte Park in the neighbouring village of Charlton

Bank Street (football ground)

Bank Street, also known as Bank Lane, was a multi-purpose stadium in Clayton, Manchester, England. It was mostly used for football matches and was the second home ground of Manchester United Football Club (then known as Newton Heath Football Club), after North Road, which they left in 1893. The stadium had a capacity of around 50,000, but the club moved to Old Trafford in 1910 because club owner John Henry Davies believed he could not sufficiently expand the ground.

The stadium was in poor repair towards the end of its life and, shortly after the club moved out to Old Trafford, the main stand at Bank Street blew down in a storm. The site is now occupied by the car park of the Manchester Velodrome, with a plaque on a house wall on Bank Street indicating the presence of the former ground. The site is close to the City of Manchester Stadium, the home of Manchester City Football Club.

Craven Street Football Ground

Craven Street Football Ground was a rugby league and a short lived greyhound racing and Association Football stadium located on Craven Street in Hull.

FIFA Street (2005 video game)

FIFA Street is a sports video game developed by EA Canada and published under the EA Sports BIG label. It is commentated on by MC Harvey of the So Solid Crew. It was released in February 2005 for PlayStation 2, Xbox and Nintendo GameCube. The cover features Brazilian international footballer Ronaldinho.

FIFA Street (2012 video game)

FIFA Street (also known as FIFA Street 2012 and FIFA Street 4) is a sports video game by EA Sports' FIFA Street franchise based on street football. It is the first such game in almost four years, and a reboot for the series. FIFA Street was developed by some of the same team behind FIFA 12, including creative director Gary Paterson, and uses the FIFA 12 game engine. Sid Misra, the line producer for FIFA Street, promised "the first true quality street football experience."The game was announced on 16 August 2011 at the Gamescom event in Germany, and was released on the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 consoles in March 2012. Along with several other new EA Sports titles, FIFA Street was available early to purchasers of the EA Sports Season Ticket. Lionel Messi features on the cover after EA announced, in November 2011, that he had signed a deal to become the new face of the FIFA franchise. The "Adidas All-Star Team" including 13 of the greatest footballers in the world and the Lionel Messi Barcelona-themed venue were available as pre-order bonus. A FIFA Street demo was launched on 28 February 2012 on Xbox Live and a day later on PSN.In an effort to make the game more "authentic", the stylised cartoon-like visuals of previous games in the series has been dropped in favour of a more realistic look, though there will still be the same emphasis on skill moves and tricks. The focus is once again on fast-paced games involving small teams of five or six players per side, one-on-one, and game modes based on panna and futsal are also included. As with the previous games in the series, skill moves are an important element of gameplay. FIFA Street features twice as many tricks as are possible in FIFA 12, with much greater variety, and over 50 more than its predecessor FIFA Street 3. Other new features include improved one-touch passing, a feature called Street Ball Control, and a new "ATTACK" dribbling system.The game features a large number of real life players from 3000 teams of many of the world's biggest leagues, and locations from around the world ranging from the streets of Amsterdam to the beaches of Rio de Janeiro. Each of these arenas attempt to reflect the style of football played in that country. The game is the first game in the series to feature both national and club teams.The game features a World Tour mode, which lets the player create their own team, from details such as crest and team kit, to players and their individual street kits. The user then competes in competitions against the AI, after which, the total skill points each player earned in the game is tallied up in a levelling system. From levelling up players the user can use points earned to upgrade their player's skill and ability from passing to shooting to goalkeeping. With the integration of EA Sports Football Club, players can add friends' players onto their World Tour team.

FIFA Street 2

FIFA Street 2 is the 2006 sequel to the EA Sports video game FIFA Street. A new "trick stick beat" system was introduced and new authentic tricks were also introduced. The game was released for the GameCube, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, PSP, Xbox, and mobile phones. The player on the game cover is Portugal international Cristiano Ronaldo.

The home console editions of the game received average reviews for the improvements on the first FIFA Street. However, the hand-held versions, particularly on the DS, were received poorly for not including those innovations.

FIFA Street 3

FIFA Street 3 is an arcade-style sports game for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and Nintendo DS. It is the third game in the FIFA Street series from EA Sports BIG, and would be the last title released under the brand until 2012's reboot of the franchise.

Football tennis

Footballtennis, also known as futnet (in Czech and Slovak nohejbal) is a sport originating in the 1920s in Czechoslovakia. It is a ball game that can be played indoors or outdoors in a court divided by a low net with two opposing teams (one, two or three players) who try to score a point hitting the ball with any part of their body except for the hands and making it bounce in the opponent's area in a way that makes it difficult or impossible for the other team to return it over the net.

Homeless World Cup

The Homeless World Cup is an annual football tournament organized by the Homeless World Cup Foundation, a social organization which advocates the end of homelessness through the sport of association football (or soccer). The organization puts together an annual football tournament where teams of homeless people from each country compete.

Keepie uppie

Keepie uppie, keep-ups or kick-ups is the skill of juggling with an association football using feet, lower legs, knees, chest, shoulders, and head, without allowing the ball to hit the ground. It is similar to Kemari, a game formerly practiced in the Japanese imperial court.

Memorial Stadium (Indiana University)

Memorial Stadium, also known as The Rock, is a stadium in Bloomington, Indiana. It is primarily used for football, and is the home field of the Indiana Hoosiers. The stadium opened in 1960 as part of a new athletics area at the university and currently has a capacity of 52,626. It replaced the original Memorial Stadium, built in 1925, a 20,000-seat stadium located on 10th Street where the arboretum now stands.

Nutmeg (football)

A nutmeg (or tunnel, nut, megs, megnuts, panna, brooksy, codling) is a skill used mainly in association football, but also in field hockey, ice hockey, and basketball. The aim is to kick, roll, dribble, throw, or push the ball (or puck) between an opponent's legs (feet).

Penalty shoot-out (association football)

A penalty shoot-out (officially kicks from the penalty mark) is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time (if used) have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play (including extra time, if any). Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

The penalty shoot-out is one of the three methods of breaking a draw that are currently approved by the Laws of the Game; the others are extra time and, for two-legged ties, the away goals rule. A shoot-out is usually used only after one or more of the other methods fail to produce a winner. The method of breaking a draw for a specific match is determined beforehand by the match organizing body. In most professional level competitions, two 15-minute extra time periods are played if the score is tied at the end of regulation time, and a shoot-out is held if the score is still tied after the extra time periods.

Although widely employed in football since the 1970s, penalty shoot-outs have been widely criticized by many followers of the game, due primarily to their perceived reliance on luck rather than skill and their dependence on individual duels between opposing players, which is arguably not in keeping with football as a team sport. Conversely, some believe the pressure and unpredictability involved makes it one of the most thrilling finales to any sport.

Sony

Sony Corporation (ソニー株式会社, Sonī Kabushiki Kaisha, SOH-nee, stylized as SONY) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo. Its diversified business includes consumer and professional electronics, gaming, entertainment and financial services. The company owns the largest music entertainment business in the world, the largest video game console business and one of the largest video game publishing businesses, and is one of the leading manufacturers of electronic products for the consumer and professional markets, and a leading player in the film and television entertainment industry. Sony was ranked 97th on the 2018 Fortune Global 500 list.Sony Corporation is the electronics business unit and the parent company of the Sony Group (ソニー・グループ, Sonī Gurūpu), which is engaged in business through its four operating components: electronics (AV, IT & communication products, semiconductors, video games, network services and medical business), motion pictures (movies and TV shows), music (record labels and music publishing) and financial services (banking and insurance). These make Sony one of the most comprehensive entertainment companies in the world. The group consists of Sony Corporation, Sony Pictures, Sony Mobile, Sony Interactive Entertainment, Sony Music, Sony/ATV Music Publishing, Sony Financial Holdings, and others.

Sony is among the semiconductor sales leaders and since 2015, the fifth-largest television manufacturer in the world after Samsung Electronics, LG Electronics, TCL and Hisense.The company's current slogan is Be Moved. Their former slogans were The One and Only (1979–1982), It's a Sony (1982–2005), like.no.other (2005–2009) and make.believe (2009–2013).Sony has a weak tie to the Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group (SMFG) corporate group, the successor to the Mitsui group.

Street F.C.

Street Football Club are a football club based in Street, near Glastonbury, in Somerset, England. They are currently members Western League Premier Division and play at the Tannery. The club is affiliated to the Somerset County FA.

Street football (American)

Street football, also known as backyard football or sandlot football, is a simplified variant of American football primarily played informally by youth. It features far less equipment and fewer rules than its counterparts, but unlike the similar touch football, features full tackling.

Séan Garnier

Arnaud "Séan" Garnier (born 18 June 1984 in Sens, France) is a French freestyle footballer. He began as an association football player, notably for Auxerre and Troyes, but his professional career was cut short due to injuries.

In 2006, Garnier studied to become a football instructor and started a program of urban freestyle art gaining fame for his own style and skills. He was taught by the current world champion Benjamin Aw. In 2008, he was declared World Champion at the inaugural Red Bull Street Style World Finals in São Paulo, Brazil. Garnier combined music, breakdance, somersaults, various football and basketball elements to his routines. He formed his own team dubbed Street Style Society also called S3 Crew, which combines freestyle football, freestyle basketball as well as some other street sport styles.Garnier is sponsored by Red Bull. In addition to performing at freestyle football shows, he also practices this sport discipline in matches, such as street soccer, futsal, profutsal or panna. He is the captain of French profotsal team Massaliotes, and champion freestyle in particular with Mexico street football players.

Ukrainian Association of Football

The Ukrainian Association of Football (UAF) (Ukrainian: Українська асоціація футболу) is the governing body of football in Ukraine. Before 2019 it was known as the Football Federation of Ukraine, FFU (Ukrainian: Федерація Футболу України). As a subject of the International Olympic Movement, UAF is a member of the National Olympic Committee of Ukraine. UAF is also member of international football organizations such as UEFA and FIFA.

Ukrainian Association of Football governs all sport events and organizations associated with the game of football including irregular competitions of beach football, mini-football, street football and others. Its main features include football competitions including the Ukrainian Professional League, the Ukrainian Cup, the Amatory, the competitions among the youth (under-18), and also the Ukraine national football team. It also sets the regulations to the Premier League and the Professional Football League.

It is headquartered in the national capital, Kiev near the Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex at the House of Football.

The organization was established in 1991. Between 1932-1991 with the Football Federation of the Soviet Union there existed its direct predecessor, Football Federation of Ukraine (Ukrainian SSR). The Soviet federation of Ukraine also conducted own championship, cup competitions, competitions among amateur teams (collectives of physical culture), as well as had own national team which participated exclusively in Soviet competitions such as the Spartakiad of Peoples of the USSR.

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