Strafford County, New Hampshire

Strafford County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. As of the 2010 census, the population was 123,143.[1] Its county seat is Dover.[2] Strafford County was one of the five original counties identified for New Hampshire in 1769. It was named after William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in the mistaken belief that he was the ancestor of governor John Wentworth – although they were distantly related, William had no descendants. The county was organized at Dover in 1771. In 1840, the size of the original county was reduced with the creation of Belknap County. Strafford County constitutes a portion of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as of the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

Strafford County, New Hampshire
Strafford County Courthouse, Dover NH
Strafford County Courthouse
Seal of Strafford County, New Hampshire

Seal
Map of New Hampshire highlighting Strafford County

Location within the U.S. state of New Hampshire
Map of the United States highlighting New Hampshire

New Hampshire's location within the U.S.
Founded1771
Named forWilliam Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford
SeatDover
Largest cityDover
Area
 • Total384 sq mi (995 km2)
 • Land369 sq mi (956 km2)
 • Water15 sq mi (39 km2), 3.9%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)130,090
 • Density353/sq mi (136/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.co.strafford.nh.us

Geography

Strafford County is in southeastern New Hampshire, separated from York County in the state of Maine by the Salmon Falls River. The southern part of the Salmon Falls, from Rollinsford to Dover, is a tidal river that flows into the Piscataqua River.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 384 square miles (990 km2), of which 369 square miles (960 km2) is land and 15 square miles (39 km2) (3.9%) is water.[3] It is the smallest county in New Hampshire by area.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179023,611
180032,61438.1%
181041,59527.5%
182051,11722.9%
183058,91015.2%
184061,1273.8%
185029,374−51.9%
186031,4937.2%
187030,243−4.0%
188035,55817.6%
189038,4428.1%
190039,3372.3%
191038,951−1.0%
192038,546−1.0%
193038,5800.1%
194043,55312.9%
195051,56718.4%
196059,79916.0%
197070,43117.8%
198085,40821.3%
1990104,23322.0%
2000112,2337.7%
2010123,1439.7%
Est. 2018130,090[4]5.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 112,233 people, 42,581 households, and 27,762 families residing in the county. The population density was 304 people per square mile (118/km²). There were 45,539 housing units at an average density of 124 per square mile (48/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.29% White, 0.63% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.39% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. 1.03% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.8% were of English, 14.9% Irish, 14.0% French, 10.5% French Canadian, 7.6% American, 6.3% Italian and 6.2% German ancestry. 93.7% spoke English and 3.2% French as their first language.

There were 42,581 households out of which 32.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.10% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.80% were non-families. 24.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.70% under the age of 18, 13.60% from 18 to 24, 30.60% from 25 to 44, 20.90% from 45 to 64, and 11.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,803, and the median income for a family was $53,075. Males had a median income of $36,661 versus $26,208 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,479. About 5.00% of families and 9.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.10% of those under age 18 and 6.60% of those age 65 or over.

The largest cities in Strafford County are Dover (population) and Rochester (land area) .

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 123,143 people, 47,100 households, and 29,862 families residing in the county.[10] The population density was 333.7 inhabitants per square mile (128.8/km2). There were 51,697 housing units at an average density of 140.1 per square mile (54.1/km2).[11] The racial makeup of the county was 93.8% white, 2.6% Asian, 1.0% black or African American, 0.2% American Indian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.8% of the population.[10] In terms of ancestry, 24.4% were French or French Canadian, 19.7% were Irish, 17.4% were English, 9.5% were Italian, 8.7% were German, 5.2% were American, and 5.0% were Scottish.[12]

Of the 47,100 households, 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 36.6% were non-families, and 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.93. The median age was 36.9 years.[10]

The median income for a household in the county was $57,809 and the median income for a family was $72,286. Males had a median income of $50,489 versus $37,178 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,059. About 6.7% of families and 11.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.3% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.[13]

Politics and government

County Commission

The executive power of Strafford County's government is held by three county commissioners.[15]

Name Hometown Party
George Maglaras (Chairman) Dover, NH Democratic
Robert Watson (Vice Chairman) Rochester, NH Democratic
Deanna Rollo (Clerk) Rollinsford, NH Democratic

In addition to the County Commission, there are five directly-elected officials: they include County Attorney, Register of Deeds, County Sheriff, Register of Probate, and County Treasurer.[16]

Office Name
County Attorney Thomas Velardi (D)
Register of Deeds Catherine Berube (D)
County Sheriff David Dubois (D)
Register of Probate Cynthia Sweeney (D)
County Treasurer Pamela Arnold (D)

Legislative branch

The legislative branch of Strafford County is made up of all of the members of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from the county. In total, as of January 2019 there were 37 members from 25 different districts.

Affiliation Members Voting share
Democratic Party 27 73%
Republican Party 10 27%
Total 37 100%

Communities

Daniel Waldron Justice of the Peace
Order naming Daniel Waldron justice of the peace, Strafford County, 1815

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Villages

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2014.
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  10. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  11. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  12. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  13. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  15. ^ http://sos.nh.gov/2016CountyGen.aspx?id=8589964161
  16. ^ https://www.co.strafford.nh.us/country-information/state-and-county-elected-officials

Further reading

External links

Coordinates: 43°17′N 71°02′W / 43.29°N 71.03°W

Berrys River

The Berrys River is a 12.9-mile (20.8 km) long river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Isinglass River, part of the Cocheco River/Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river rises in Farmington, New Hampshire and flows southeast past Blue Job Mountain. Turning south, the river passes through the eastern corner of Strafford and enters Barrington, where it is interrupted by Long Pond. One mile below the pond, the Berrys River reaches the Isinglass.

Big River (New Hampshire)

The Big River is a 14.9-mile-long (24.0 km) river located in central New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Suncook River, part of the Merrimack River (and therefore Gulf of Maine) watershed.

The Big River rises in high ground in the southern corner of Alton, New Hampshire and flows southeast through corners of New Durham and Farmington into Strafford. Running up against the Blue Hills Range, the river reverses course, turning west into Barnstead, where it meets the Suncook River in the village of Center Barnstead.

Blue Job Mountain

Blue Job Mountain is a mountain in Farmington, New Hampshire. It has a fire tower at the summit, and numerous trails, most commonly accessed from First Crown Point Road in neighboring Strafford, crisscross the mountain.

Blue Job Mountain State Forest occupies 284 acres (115 ha) around the summit.

Branch River (New Hampshire)

The Branch River is an 11.9-mile (19.2 km) long river located in eastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Salmon Falls River, part of the Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river begins at the outlet of Lovell Lake at Sanbornville, a village in the town of Wakefield, New Hampshire. The river turns south, paralleling New Hampshire Route 16, passes through the village of Union, and turns southeast to reach the Salmon Falls River in Northeast Pond, within the town of Milton.

A significant tributary is Jones Brook.

Bunker Creek

Bunker Creek is a stream in the town of Durham, Strafford County, New Hampshire, in the United States. It is a tributary of the tidal Oyster River. The stream is 0.7 miles (1.1 km) long.Bunker Creek was named for James Bunker, who built a garrison on the creek in the 1650s.

Cochecho River

The Cochecho River or Cocheco River is a tributary of the Piscataqua River, 38.3 miles (61.6 km) long, in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. It rises in northern Strafford County and runs southeastward, through the town of Farmington and the cities of Rochester and Dover, where it provides hydroelectric power. Below the center of Dover, the river is tidal and joins the Salmon Falls River at the Maine border to form the Piscataqua.

Significant tributaries include the Ela River, the Mad River, and the Isinglass River.

Ela River

The Ela River is a 10.6-mile (17.1 km) long river located in eastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Cocheco River, part of the Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river begins at Coldrain Pond in New Durham, New Hampshire, four miles east of Lake Winnipesaukee. Flowing south through Club Pond, the river turns southeast and descends to Farmington, where it joins the Cocheco. New Hampshire Route 11 parallels the river for most of its southeasterly course.

Jones Brook

Jones Brook is a 10.6-mile-long (17.1 km) stream located in eastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Branch River, which leads to the Salmon Falls River, part of the Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

Jones Brook rises in the Moose Mountains, on the border between Brookfield and Middleton, New Hampshire, and flows southeast through Middleton. Upon entering Milton, the stream turns back to the northwest and joins the Branch River downstream from the village of Union.

Little River (Big River tributary)

The Little River is a 4.9-mile-long (7.9 km) river located in central New Hampshire in the United States. Its outflow travels via the Big River, Suncook River, and Merrimack River to the Gulf of Maine, an arm of the Atlantic Ocean.

The Little River drains the west side of the Blue Hills Range in Strafford, New Hampshire. It begins at the outlet of the Willey Ponds and flows northwest, joining the Big River just north of the village of South Barnstead.

Little River (Lamprey River tributary)

The Little River is a 10.4 mile long (16.7 km) river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river rises in Barrington, New Hampshire as a tributary of Mendums Pond. Upon leaving Mendums Pond, the river enters Nottingham, flowing south through Nottingham Lake and then east, where it joins the Lamprey River near the town center of Lee.

Madbury, New Hampshire

Madbury is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 1,771 at the 2010 census.

Merrymeeting River

The Merrymeeting River is a 10.0-mile-long (16.1 km) river located in the Lakes Region of central New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of Lake Winnipesaukee, part of the Merrimack River watershed.

The river begins at the outlet of Merrymeeting Lake in the town of New Durham. The river flows south through a chain of ponds to the village proper of New Durham. After passing under New Hampshire Route 11, the river enters Merrymeeting Marsh and turns sharply to the northwest, the course it will take the rest of the way to its end. The river crosses a small dam at Alton and reaches Lake Winnipesaukee at the community of Alton Bay.

Middleton, New Hampshire

Middleton is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 1,783 at the 2010 census.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Strafford County, New Hampshire

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Strafford County, New Hampshire.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 45 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including one National Historic Landmark.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted June 7, 2019.

New Durham, New Hampshire

New Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,638 at the 2010 census. It is drained by the Merrymeeting , Cocheco and Ela rivers, and is known for Merrymeeting Lake. New Durham is home to the Powder Mill Fish Hatchery. Also located here is the Lions Club's Camp Pride, a camp for children and adults with special needs.

North River (New Hampshire)

The North River is a 15.1-mile (24.3 km) long river located in southeastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Lamprey River, part of the Great Bay and Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river begins at the outlet of North River Pond in the northern corner of Nottingham, New Hampshire. It flows southeast through hilly, wooded terrain, crossing the entire town of Nottingham, the southwest corner of Lee, and a northern part of Epping, where it joins the Lamprey. A major tributary of the North River is the Bean River, which joins from the west in the center part of Nottingham.

Rattlesnake River

The Rattlesnake River is a 3.6-mile-long (5.9 km) river in eastern New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Cocheco River, part of the Piscataqua River watershed leading to the Atlantic Ocean.

The river is located entirely in the town of Farmington. It rises north of Hussey Mountain and Chesley Mountain and flows east to the Cocheco River, dropping 500 feet in elevation over its length.

Salmon Falls River

The Salmon Falls River is a tributary of the Piscataqua River in the U.S. states of Maine and New Hampshire. It rises at Great East Lake, Newichawannock Canal, and Horn Pond and flows south-southeast for approximately 38 miles (61 km), forming the border between York County, Maine, and Strafford County, New Hampshire.The Salmon Falls River joins the Cochecho River near Dover, New Hampshire to form the Piscataqua River.It provides hydroelectric power at the New Hampshire towns of Milton, North Rochester, East Rochester, New Hampshire, Somersworth, and Rollinsford, and in Maine at Berwick and South Berwick. The final three miles of the river, from South Berwick to the Piscataqua, are tidal.

Local Abenaki Indians called the river Newichawannock, meaning "river with many falls". See Newichawannock Canal

Strafford, New Hampshire

Strafford is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 3,991 at the 2010 census. The two main settlements in town are Center Strafford and Bow Lake Village.

Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
Places adjacent to Strafford County, New Hampshire
Municipalities and communities of Strafford County, New Hampshire, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Other villages
Topics
Regions
Counties
Cities
Towns
Townships

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.