Stoner film

Stoner film is a subgenre of comedy films that revolve around the use of cannabis.[1] Generally, cannabis use is one of the main themes and inspires much of the plot. They are often representative of cannabis culture.

"Stoner film" as a genre

The series of movies in the 1970s starring Cheech & Chong are archetypal "stoner movies". The historic film Reefer Madness (1936) has also become popular as a "stoner movie" because its anti-drug message is seen by some modern viewers as so over the top that the film amounts to self-parody. Playing on such parody, a musical comedy remake set in 1936 (as the original film was), Reefer Madness, was released in 2005.

High Times magazine regularly sponsors the Stony Awards to celebrate stoner films and television. Many of these films do not fit the category of "stoner film" as a subgenre, but contain enough cannabis use to be deemed noteworthy by the periodical.

Common elements

Many stoner movies have certain elements and themes in common.[2][3] The template involves a protagonist or protagonists (often two friends in a variation of the buddy film) who have or are attempting to find marijuana and have some task to complete. Often stoner films involve evading authority figures, sometimes law-enforcement agents, who are portrayed as comically inept, but also parents, co-workers, friends, and security guards, who disapprove of the protagonists' marijuana usage, usually out of a greater lack of acceptance of their lifestyle of leisure and innocence. Most serious moments are intended ironically, often to parody overwrought counterparts in mainstream cinema. The comic story arcs often approach or fall over the line into slapstick.[2]

Notable stoner films

Notable stoner television shows

See also

References

  1. ^ Meltzer, Marisa (26 June 2007). "Leisure and Innocence: The eternal appeal of the stoner movie". Slate. Retrieved 7 February 2012.
  2. ^ a b Pastorek, Whitney (27 July 2004). "Joint Ventures". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 1 April 2007.
  3. ^ Meltzer, Marisa (26 June 2007). "The eternal appeal of the stoner movie". Slate.com. Retrieved 20 April 2011.
  4. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Class_of_Nuke_%27Em_High
  5. ^ Alchimia Blog, Cannabis and Cinema
  6. ^ "Kid Cannabis" – via www.imdb.com.
Bradford Tatum

Bradford Steven Tatum (born March 29, 1965 in California) is an American actor and author, known for his role as Michael Hubbs in the cult favorite stoner film The Stoned Age (1994). He also played the bully, John Box in Powder (1995). In 1999, Bradford wrote, directed, and starred in the indie film Standing on Fishes. Bradford is married to actress Stacy Haiduk, whom he guest-starred with in the seaQuest DSV episode "Nothing but the Truth". In 2006, Tatum released the indie film Salt: A Fatal Attraction, which he wrote, produced and starred in. This film also featured his wife, Stacy Haiduk, and his daughter, Sophia Tatum. In 2016, he joined the cast of the HBO series Westworld.

Cannabis culture

Cannabis culture describes a social atmosphere or series of associated social behaviors that depends heavily upon cannabis consumption, particularly as an entheogen, recreational drug and medicine.

Historically cannabis has been used an entheogen to induce spiritual experiences - most notably in the Indian subcontinent since the Vedic period dating back to approximately 1500 BCE, but perhaps as far back as 2000 BCE. Its entheogenic use was also recorded in Ancient China, the Germanic peoples, the Celts, Ancient Central Asia, and Africa. In modern times, spiritual use of the drug is mostly associated with the Rastafari movement of Jamaica. Several Western subcultures have had marijuana consumption as an idiosyncratic feature, such as hippies, beatniks, hipsters (both the 1940s subculture and the contemporary subculture), ravers and hip hop.

Cannabis has now "evolved its own language, humour, etiquette, art, literature and music." Nick Brownlee writes: "Perhaps because of its ancient mystical and spiritual roots, because of the psychotherapeutic effects of the drug and because it is illegal, even the very act of smoking a joint has deep symbolism." However, the culture of cannabis as "the manifestation of introspection and bodily passivity" — which has generated a negative "slacker" stereotype around its consumers — is a relatively modern concept, as cannabis has been consumed in various forms for almost 5,000 years.The counterculture of the 1960s has been identified as the era that "sums up the glory years of modern cannabis culture," with the Woodstock Festival serving as "the pinnacle of the hippie revolution in the USA, and in many people's opinion the ultimate example of cannabis culture at work". The influence of cannabis has encompassed holidays (most notably 4/20), cinema (such as the exploitation and stoner film genres), music (particularly jazz, reggae, psychedelia and rap music), and magazines including High Times and Cannabis Culture.

Good Times (Styles P song)

"Good Times" is a song by American hip hop recording artist Styles P, released as his solo debut single and the lead single from his debut album, A Gangster and a Gentleman (2002). The single, produced by Swizz Beatz and Saint Denson, samples "I Get High (On Your Memory)", as performed by Freda Payne.

The song, which is dedicated to his marijuana use, peaked at number 22 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and received massive nationwide airplay in 2002. The song was also featured on the 2002 compilation album Swizz Beatz Presents G.H.E.T.T.O. Stories, as well as Music Inspired by Scarface (2003) and on the soundtrack to the 2004 stoner film, Soul Plane.

How High

How High is a 2001 stoner film starring Method Man and Redman, written by Dustin Lee Abraham, and director Jesse Dylan's debut feature film.

Kili Poyi

Kili Poyi is a 2013 Indian Malayalam language stoner film directed by debutant Vinay Govind, a former associate of V. K. Prakash. The film stars Asif Ali, Aju Varghese, Sampath Raj, Raveendran, and Sreejith Ravi in major roles. The film was produced by SJM Entertainments and written by Joseph Kurian, Vivek Ranjit and Vinay Govind. The film features music and background score composed by Rahul Raj. Kili Poyi is considered to be the first Indian stoner film.

Psychedelic film

Psychedelic film is a film genre characterized by the influence of psychedelia and the experiences of psychedelic drugs. Psychedelic films typically contain visual distortion and experimental narratives, often emphasizing psychedelic imagery. They might reference drugs directly, or merely present a distorted reality resembling the effects of psychedelic drugs. Their experimental narratives often purposefully try to distort the viewers' understanding of reality or normality.

Zoltan (hand gesture)

Zoltan is a hand gesture in which a person has their hands stacked on top of each other, only touching at the tips of the thumbs, in order to form a letter "Z". Originally used in the 2000 stoner film Dude, Where's My Car? (with the thumbs overlapping), the Zoltan hand gesture also became popular in 2012 with members of the Pittsburgh Pirates, as well as residents of Pittsburgh rallying around the team.

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