Stina Blackstenius

Emma Stina Blackstenius (born 5 February 1996) is a Swedish footballer who plays as a forward for Damallsvenskan club Linköpings FC. She is a member of the Swedish national team.

Stina Blackstenius
Stina Blackstenius
Personal information
Full name Emma Stina Blackstenius
Date of birth 5 February 1996 (age 23)
Place of birth Vadstena, Sweden
Height 1.74 m (5 ft 8 12 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Linköpings FC
Number 20
Youth career
Vadstena GIF
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2011–2012 Vadstena GIF 35 (59)
2013–2016 Linköpings FC 79 (39)
2017–2019 Montpellier HSC 38 (26)
2019– Linköpings FC 7 (4)
National team
2012–2013 Sweden U17 16 (11)
2013–2015 Sweden U19 29 (34)
2016 Sweden U20 5 (8)
2015– Sweden 48 (12)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 12:40, 30 June 2019 (UTC)

Club career

Blackstenius began her career with local club Vadstena GIF. In the 2012 season, she played for the club in Division Three and scored 38 goals to finish as top scorer. She was subsequently nominated for Östergötland's Girls Player of the Year.[1]

Prior to the 2013 season, Blackstenius signed a three-year contract with Linköpings FC. She enjoyed a successful debut season in the Damallsvenskan, scoring eight goals and posting three assists.[2] In January 2014 she extended her Linköpings contract by a further three years.[3]

In January 2017 she signed three-year deal with Division 1 Féminine club Montpellier HSC.[4] Blackstenius helped Montpellier to finish second in her first year at the club.

In 2019 Blackstenius returned to Sweden, signing a two-year contract with her former club Linköpings FC.[5] She made her second debut in a 5–0 win over Växjö DFF in the Damallsvenskan.

International career

As a Sweden under-19 international, Blackstenius featured prominently at the 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship. She finished as top goalscorer after hitting six goals for the victorious Swedish team, including two in the 3–1 final win over Spain.[6]

Blackstenius made her debut for the senior Sweden team in a 1–0 UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying win over Denmark on 27 October 2015, at Gamla Ullevi.

On 8 April 2016 she scored her first goal for the senior Sweden national team, the third in Sweden's 3–0 win over Slovakia in Poprad during a qualifying game for the 2017 European Championship in the Netherlands.

She was named in the Swedish team for the 2016 Summer Olympics, scoring as a substitute against the USA and in the gold medal match against Germany, where Sweden took the silver medals.

After helping Sweden qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup she was selected in the final squad to travel to France. She started the first game in a 2–0 win over Chile. In the Round of 16 match against Canada, she scored the only goal.[7] In the quarter-final against Germany she also scored the decisive goal, in Sweden's 2–1 win.[8]

International goals

Honours

Linköpings FC
Sweden
Sweden U19
France WWC 2019

References

  1. ^ "Supertalang klar för LFC" (in Swedish). Linköpings FC. 27 December 2012. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  2. ^ Johansson, Maja. "Sveriges 30 största talanger listas" (in Swedish). Damfotboll.com. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  3. ^ "Blackstenius fortsätter i LFC" (in Swedish). Sveriges Television. 9 January 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  4. ^ "Sweden's Stina Blackstenius signs three-year deal with Montpellier". Excelle Sport. 3 January 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-08-16. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  5. ^ "Stina Blackstenius is back!". Linköpings Fotboll Club (in Swedish). 2019-01-30. Retrieved 2019-06-16.
  6. ^ "Blackstenius crowned WU19 EURO top scorer". UEFA. 27 July 2015. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  7. ^ "Stina Blackstenius gives Sweden last-16 women's World Cup victory over Canada". Times of India. 25 June 2019. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Stina Blackstenius sends Sweden past Germany and into World Cup semi-final". The Guardian. 29 June 2019. Retrieved 29 June 2019.

External links

2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 14th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (18th edition if the Under-18 era is included), the annual European youth football competition contested by the women's under-19 national teams of the member associations of UEFA. Israel hosted the tournament. Players born on or after 1 January 1996 were eligible to participate in this competition.

Same as previous editions held in odd-numbered years, the tournament acted as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. The four semi-finalists qualified for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in Papua New Guinea as the UEFA representatives.

2016 Damallsvenskan

The 2016 Damallsvenskan is the 28th season of the Swedish women's association football top division, Damallsvenskan. FC Rosengård were the defending champions, having won the competition in 2015.Linköpings FC is the champion of the season.

2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2016 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup was the 8th edition of the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-20 national teams of the member associations of FIFA. The tournament was held in Papua New Guinea from 13 November to 3 December 2016. This was the first FIFA tournament held in the country.

North Korea won their 2nd title in this event by beating France in the final, 3–1. They became the first country to win the U-20 and U-17 Women's World Cup in the same year, with their under-17 team winning the 2016 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup earlier in the year.

2017–18 Division 1 Féminine

The 2017–18 Division 1 Féminine season was the 44th edition since its establishment. Lyon were the defending champions, having won the title in each of the past eleven seasons. The season began on 3 September 2017 and ended on 27 May 2018. Lyon won their 16th (12th straight) title.

2018 Algarve Cup

The 2018 Algarve Cup was the 25th edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It took place from 28 February to 7 March 2018.Because the final between the Netherlands and Sweden was cancelled, the trophy was awarded to both teams.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group F

Group F of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 11 to 20 June 2019. The group consisted of Chile, Sweden, Thailand and the United States. The top two teams, the United States and Sweden, advanced to the round of 16.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 22 June with the round of 16 and ended on 7 July with the final match, held at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu. A total of 16 teams (the top two teams from each group, along with the four best third-placed teams) advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament.All times listed are local, CEST (UTC+2).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 4

UEFA Group 4 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Sweden, Denmark, Ukraine, Hungary, and Croatia. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 15 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics

The association football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 20 August in Brazil.In addition to the Olympic host city of Rio de Janeiro, matches were played in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Salvador, São Paulo, and Manaus. All six cities hosted matches during the 2014 World Cup, with the Estádio Olímpico João Havelange in Rio the only Olympic venue not to have been a World Cup venue.Associations affiliated with FIFA might send teams to participate in the tournament. Men's teams were restricted to under-23 players (born on or after 1 January 1993) with a maximum of three overage players allowed, while there were no age restrictions on women's teams. The Games made use of about 400 footballs.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament – Group E

Group E of the women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played from 3 to 9 August 2016, and included hosts Brazil, China, South Africa and Sweden. The top two teams advanced to the knockout stage, while the third-placed team also advanced if they were among the two best third-placed teams among all three groups.All times are BRT (UTC−3). For matches in Manaus, which is in AMT (UTC−4), local times are listed in parentheses.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament – Knockout stage

The knockout stage of the women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played from 12 to 19 August 2016. The top two teams from each group in the group stage and the two best third-placed teams qualified for the knockout stage.All times are local, BRT (UTC−3).

Linköpings FC

Linköpings Fotboll Club is an association football club from Linköping, Sweden. The club was established in 2003 when Kenty DFF women's football club decided to merge with the premier division ice hockey club Linköpings HC under the new name Linköpings FC. The club's goal was both to establish women's football as a sport in Linköping and eventually become one of the top four teams.

List of women's Olympic football tournament records and statistics

This is a list of records of the women's football tournament in the Olympic games ever since the inaugural edition in 1996.

Stina

Stina is a feminine given name, common in the Nordic countries, and may refer to:

Stina Aronson (1892–1956), Swedish writer

Stina Berg (1869–1930), Swedish actress

Stina Bergman (1888–1976), Swedish writer, translator, and screenwriter

Stina Blackstenius (born 1996), Swedish association football player

Stina Lundberg Dabrowski (born 1950), Swedish journalist, television host, producer and writer

Stina Ekblad (born 1953), Swedish-speaking Finnish actress

Stina Grenholm, Swedish ski-orienteer

Stina Mårtensson (1882–1962), Swedish missionary

Stina Martini (born 1993), Austrian skater

Stina Nordenstam (born 1969), Swedish singer, songwriter and musician

Stina Lykke Petersen (born 1986), Danish footballer

Stina Rautelin (born 1963), Swedish-speaking Finnish actress

Stina Robson, formally known as Inga-Stina Robson, Baroness Robson of Kiddington

Stina Segerström (born 1982), Swedish footballer

Stina Torjesen, Norwegian scientist

Stina Troest (born 1994), Danish hurdler

Stina Viktorsson (born 1985), Swedish curler

Stina Wirsén (born 1968), Swedish illustrator

Stina Wollter (born 1964), Swedish radio host and artist

Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Sweden women's national football team has represented Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. There were runners up once. and three times bronze medalists: in 1991, in 2011 and in 2019.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Group B

Group B of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 contained Germany, Italy, Russia and Sweden. The matches were played from 17 to 25 July 2017.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 knockout stage

The knockout phase of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 began on 29 July 2017 and ended on 6 August 2017 with the final.All times local (UTC+2).

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying Group 4

Group 4 of the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying competition consisted of five teams: Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Slovakia, and Moldova. The composition of the eight groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 20 April 2015.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format. The group winners qualified directly for the final tournament, while the runners-up also qualified directly if they were one of the six best runners-up among all eight groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team); otherwise, the runners-up advance to the play-offs.

UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship is a competition in women's football for European national teams of players under 19 years of age. National under-19 teams whose countries belong to the European governing body UEFA can register to enter the competition.

In odd years the tournament is also a FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup qualifying competition. The tournament began in the 1997–98 season as an under-18 event and became an under-19s event from the 2001–02 season, it is held yearly. The Championship has 3 phases: the qualifying phase open to all eligible nations, the elite phase featuring the group winners and runners-up from the qualifying phase, and the finals phase which is composed of 8 qualifying teams. The finals themselves are composed of two groups of four teams; each team plays the others in the group. The winner of each group after the 3 matches plays the runner-up of the opposing group in a semi-final, with the winner contesting the final.

Key (expand for notes on “international goals” and sorting)
Location Geographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
Sorted by country name first, then by city name
Lineup Start – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
(c) – captain
Sorted by minutes played

# NumberOfGoals.goalNumber scored by the player in the match (alternate notation to Goal in match)
Min The minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/pass The ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pk Goal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
Score The match score after the goal was scored.
Sorted by goal difference, then by goal scored by the player's team
Result The final score.

Sorted by goal difference in the match, then by goal difference in penalty-shoot-out if it is taken, followed by goal scored by the player's team in the match, then by goal scored in the penalty-shoot-out. For matches with identical final scores, match ending in extra-time without penalty-shoot-out is a tougher match, therefore precede matches that ended in regulation

aet The score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Light-purple background colorexhibition or closed door international friendly match
Light-yellow background color – match at an invitational tournament
Light-orange background color – Olympic women's football qualification match
Light-blue background color – FIFA women's world cup qualification match
Orange background color – Olympic women's football tournament
Blue background color – FIFA women's world cup final tournament

NOTE: some keys may not apply for a particular football player


Goal
Date
Location Opponent Score Result Competition
1 2015-09-22 Poprad, Slovakia  Slovakia

0–3

0–3

Euro 2017 qualifying
2 2016-08-12 Brasília, Brazil  United States

0–1

1–1

Olympics 2016
3 2016-08-19 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil  Germany

1–2

1–2

Olympics 2016
4 2017-07-21 Deventer, Netherlands  Russia

2–0

2–0

UEFA Women's Euro 2017
5 2017-07-25 Doetinchem, Netherlands  Italy

2–2

2–3

UEFA Women's Euro 2017
6 2018-02-28 Parchal, Portugal  Canada

1–3

1–3

2018 Algarve Cup
7 2018-03-02 Parchal, Portugal  South Korea

1–0

1–1

2018 Algarve Cup
8 2018-04-05 Szombathely, Hungary  Hungary

1–3

1–4

2019 World Cup qualification
9 2018-06-07 Gothenburg, Sweden  Croatia

1–0

4–0

2019 World Cup qualification
10 2018-06-07 Gothenburg, Sweden  Croatia

3–0

4–0

2019 World Cup qualification
11 2019-06-24 Paris, France  Canada

1–0

1–0

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
12 2019-06-29 Rennes, France  Germany

1–2

1–2

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
Linköpings FC – current squad

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