Stickball

Stickball is a street game related to baseball, usually formed as a pick-up game played in large cities in the Northeastern United States, especially New York City and Philadelphia. The equipment consists of a broom handle and a rubber ball, typically a spaldeen, pensy pinky, high bouncer or tennis ball. The rules come from baseball and are modified to fit the situation. For example, a manhole cover may be used as a base, or buildings for foul lines. The game is a variation of stick and ball games dating back to at least the 1750s. This game was widely popular among youths during the 20th century until the 1980s.

Queens stickball
Stickball in New York

Variants

Boys Playing Stickball, Havana, Cuba, 1999
Kids playing stickball in Havana, 1999

Many Native American cultures in what is now the eastern United States played a stickball-like game that is the ancestor of modern-day lacrosse, using hickory sticks and a ball made of deer hair or hide.[1] In fungo, the batter tosses the ball into the air and hits it on the way down or after one or more bounces.[2]

Films

See also

References

  1. ^ "Stickball (a ne jo di)" at cherokee.org; retrieved 09 June 2014.
  2. ^ "Stickball Basics". Streetplay.com. Retrieved August 24, 2012.
Brewster Site

The Brewster Site is an archaeological site associated with a village of the Mill Creek culture near Cherokee, Iowa, United States. Among the items found here are ceremonial or decorative items manufactured from birds. Pottery that has been tempered with crushed granite, sand, and pulverized clamshell has also been found. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

Cherokee National Holiday

The Cherokee National Holiday is an annual event held each Labor Day weekend in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The event celebrates the September 6, 1839 signing of the Constitution of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma after the Trail of Tears Indian removal ended.

Coram's Fields

Coram's Fields is a large urban open space in the London borough of Camden in central London. It occupies seven acres in Bloomsbury and includes a children's playground, sand pits, a duck pond, a pets corner, café and nursery. Adults (defined as anyone over the age of 16) are only permitted to enter if accompanied by children (under 16).It is situated on the former site of the Foundling Hospital, established by Thomas Coram in what was then named Lamb's Conduit Field in 1739. In the 1920s The Foundling Hospital was relocated outside London to Ashlyns School in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, and the site was earmarked for redevelopment. However, a campaign organised by Janet Trevelyan and fundraising by local residents and a donation from Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere led to the creation of the current park that opened in 1936. Coram's Fields is owned and run by an independent registered charity, officially named Coram's Fields and the Harmsworth Memorial Playground.Coram's Fields also offers three eight-a-side football pitches, two tennis courts, a stickball field and a basketball court.

The Thomas Coram Foundation for Children (the successor charity to the Foundling Hospital) and the Foundling Museum housing the art collections of the former Hospital, are based in buildings nearby.

To the west is Brunswick Square, and to the east is Mecklenburgh Square (bordered by Goodenough College to the south), two historical London squares. To the north is the Thomas Coram Foundation and St George's Gardens. To the south are Guilford Street and Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Coram's Fields, and Brunswick and Mecklenburgh Squares are jointly listed Grade II on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.The park users are organised in an independent body called Coram's Fields User Group. Coram's Fields User Group (CFUG) acts as a critical friend and supporter of development of Coram's Fields. In recent years, Coram's Fields User Group was a vocal opponent of an extensive rental of Coram's Fields grounds to adults and private events, including through information published in local media: Camden New Journal Letter .

Culture of the Choctaw

The culture of the Choctaw has greatly evolved over the centuries combining mostly European-American influences; however, interaction with Spain, France, and England greatly shaped it as well. The Choctaws, or Chahtas, are a Native American people originally from the Southeastern United States. They were known for their rapid incorporation of modernity, developing a written language, transitioning to yeoman farming methods, and having European-American and African-Americans lifestyles enforced in their society. The Choctaw culture has it roots in the Mississippian culture era of the mound builders.

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI), (Cherokee: ᏣᎳᎩᏱ ᏕᏣᏓᏂᎸᎩ, Tsalagiyi Detsadanilvgi) is a federally recognized Native American tribe in the United States, who are descended from the small group of 800 Cherokee who remained in the Eastern United States after the Indian Removal Act moved the other 15,000 Cherokee to the west in the 19th century. They were required to assimilate and renounce tribal Cherokee citizenship.The history of the Eastern Band closely follows that of the Qualla Boundary, a land trust made up of an area of their original territory. When they reorganized as a tribe, they had to buy back the land from the US government. The EBCI also own, hold, or maintain additional lands in the vicinity, and as far away as 100 miles (160 km) from the Qualla Boundary. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians are primarily the descendants of those persons listed on the Baker Rolls of Cherokee Indians. They gained federal recognition as a tribe in the 20th century. The Qualla Boundary is not a reservations per se because the land is owned by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is one of three federally recognized Cherokee tribes, the others being the Cherokee Nation and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians, both based in Oklahoma. Its headquarters is in the namesake town of Cherokee, North Carolina in the Qualla Boundary, south of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Fuzzball

Fuzzball may refer to:

Fuzzball (sport), a variation of baseball similar to stickball

Fuzzball (string theory), an alternative quantum description of black holes

Fuzzball router, the first modern routers on the Internet

Fuzzball, a cartoon appearing in the TV series KaBlam!

A small animal with fur, such as a kitten or ferret

History of lacrosse

Lacrosse has its origins in a tribal game played by eastern Woodlands Native Americans and by some Plains Indians tribes in what is now the United States of America and Canada. The game was extensively modified by European colonizers to North America to create its current collegiate and professional form. There were hundreds of native men playing a ball game with sticks. The game began with the ball being tossed into the air and the two sides rushing to catch it. Because of the large number of players involved, these games generally tended to involve a huge mob of players swarming the ball and slowly moving across the field. Passing the ball was thought of as a trick, and it was seen as cowardly to dodge an opponent. Years later lacrosse is still a popular sport played all over the world.

Indigenous North American stickball

Indigenous North American stickball is considered to be one of the oldest team sports in North America. Stickball and lacrosse are similar to one another, the game of lacrosse is a tradition belonging to tribes of the Northern United States and Canada; stickball, on the other hand, continues in Oklahoma and parts of the Southeastern U.S. where the game originated.

Although the first recorded writing on the topic of stickball was not until the mid-17th century, there is evidence that the game had been developed and played hundreds of years before that.

Invisible runner rule

An invisible runner, or ghost runner, is a device used in baseball-style games, including softball, stickball, and kickball, when a team has fewer than four players. Used primarily in schoolyard games, the rule is called into action when a live runner on base is next in line to bat. The specifics of the rule vary regionally, and are often negotiated prior to the start of the game.

Kullihoma Grounds

Kullihoma Grounds consists of 1,500 acres (6,100,000 m2) owned by the Chickasaw Nation, located 10 miles (16 km) east of Ada, Oklahoma. The land was purchased in 1936, and the Chickasaw built replicas of historic tribal dwellings on the site and uses it as a stomp ground. Historically, Chickasaw housing consisted of summer and winter houses and corn cribs. The tribe also built a circular council house on the site.

From Indian Removal to 1936, Chickasaw people held conducted an annual Green Corn Ceremony on this land.Choctaw and Chickasaw people use the ground for cultural celebrations, such as stomp dances, stick ball tournaments, and the annual Chikasha Ittafama, or Chickasaw Reunion. The game of chunkey, which had been played by Eastern Woodlands tribes and Plains tribes long before European and African contract, was reintroduced at the Chickasaw Reunion.

List of ball games

This is a list of ball games which are popular games or sports involving some type of ball or similar object. Ball sports are not sports in the true sense, but are instead considered to be games. These ball games can be grouped by the general objective of the game, sometimes indicating a common origin either of a game itself or of its basic idea:

Bat-and-ball games, such as cricket and baseball.

Racquet and ball games, such as tennis, squash, racquetball and ball badminton.

Hand and ball-striking games, such as various handball codes, rebound handball and 4 square.

Goal games, such as forms of hockey (except ice hockey which uses a hockey puck), basketball and all forms of football or lacrosse.

Net games, such as volleyball and sepak.

Little Italy, San Diego

Little Italy is a somewhat hilly neighborhood in Downtown San Diego, California that was originally a predominately Italian fishing neighborhood. It has since been gentrified and now Little Italy is a scenic neighborhood composed mostly of Italian restaurants, Italian retail shops, home design stores, art galleries, and residential units.

Little Italy is one of the more active downtown neighborhoods and has frequent festivals and events including a weekly farmers market, also known as the Mercato (the Market, in Italian). The neighborhood has low crime rates when compared with other neighborhoods in Downtown San Diego and is maintained by the Little Italy Neighborhood Association, which looks after trash collection, decorations, and special events.

MLB Stickball

MLB Stickball was a MLB-licensed stickball video game published by 2K Sports for the Xbox 360 via Xbox Live Arcade. It was released on October 8, 2008, and removed from the Xbox live Marketplace in December 2014.

New York Emperors Stickball League

The New York Emperors Stickball League is a stickball league in The Bronx, New York City. Established in 1985, the league has nine teams and a youth division. The seasons lasts from 180 games to 240 games a season.

Spaldeen

A Spalding Hi-Bounce Ball, often called a Spaldeen, is a rubber ball, the size of a tennis ball without the felt. It was the more expensive and more popular version of the Pensie Pinkie (made by Penn Racquet Sports). These balls are commonly used in street games developed in the mid-20th century, such as Chinese handball (a variation on American handball), stoop ball, hit-the-penny (involving trying to make a penny flip on a sidewalk), butts up, handball, punchball, half-rubber, and stickball (a variation of baseball).

Stickball (album)

Stickball is the third album by American saxophonist Charles Williams recorded in 1972 for the Mainstream label.

Street game

A street game is a sport or game that is played on city streets rather than a prepared field. Street games are usually simply play time activities for children in the most convenient venue. However some street games have risen to the level of organized tournaments, such as stickball.

When street games are based on organized sports the rules are usually highly modified to fit the situation, i.e. manhole covers for bases with cars or buildings for foul lines in stickball. When balls are used in street games, spaldeens are often used.

Vitilla

Vitilla is a popular variation of stickball played primarily in the Dominican Republic and areas in the United States with large Dominican populations.

Westminster School (Connecticut)

Westminster School is a private, coeducational college-preparatory, boarding and day school located in Simsbury, Connecticut accepting around 20% of applicants. The total student population is approximately 400, and includes pupils from 25 US states and 30 countries.. It is also a member of the Founders League, an athletic league comprising ten college preparatory boarding schools in Connecticut and one in New York .

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