Steve Sloan

Stephen Charles Sloan (born August 19, 1944) is a former American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played college football as a quarterback at the University of Alabama from 1962 to 1965 and then played for two seasons in the National Football League with the Atlanta Falcons (1966–1967). Sloan served as the head football coach at Vanderbilt University (1973–1974), Texas Tech University (1975–1977), the University of Mississippi (1978–1982), and Duke University (1983–1986), compiling a career record of 68–86–3. He also served as the athletic director at the University of Alabama, the University of North Texas, University of Central Florida, and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga before his retirement in 2006.[1] In 2000, Sloan was inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame.[2]

Steve Sloan
Biographical details
BornAugust 19, 1944 (age 74)
Cleveland, Tennessee
Playing career
1962–1965Alabama
1966–1967Atlanta Falcons
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1968–1970Alabama (assistant)
1971Florida State (OC)
1972Georgia Tech (OC)
1973–1974Vanderbilt
1975–1977Texas Tech
1978–1982Ole Miss
1983–1986Duke
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1987–1989Alabama
1991–1993North Texas
1993–2002UCF
2002–2006Chattanooga
Head coaching record
Overall68–86–3
Bowls0–2–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 SWC (1976)
Awards
Sammy Baugh Trophy (1965)
SEC Coach of the Year (1974)
SWC Coach of the Year (1976)

Playing career

Sloan played college football at the University of Alabama under legendary coach Paul "Bear" Bryant between 1962–1965. He arrived in Tuscaloosa in 1962, though was not eligible to play with the varsity team due to NCAA rules at the time. In his sophomore season, Sloan was a backup to quarterback Joe Namath, but played in most games at defensive back. Sloan quarterbacked the Tide's final regular season game and the Sugar Bowl when Bryant benched Namath for disciplinary reasons.[2] The 1963 Crimson Tide went 9–2 with a 12–7 victory over Ole Miss in the Sugar Bowl.

Sloan was the primary quarterback in his junior season in 1964 while Namath was injured. The 1964 team finished 10–1, won the Southeastern Conference title, and was named the consensus national champion. However, in the 1965 Orange Bowl versus Texas, Sloan was forced out of the game with injury. Namath came off the bench to win MVP honors despite Alabama losing, 21–17.[3]

Following the departure of Namath to the American Football League, Sloan became Alabama's full-time starter for the 1965 season,[2][4] in which Alabama repeated as SEC and national champions. The team finished 9–1–1 with a 39–28 victory over Nebraska in the 1966 Orange Bowl.

After college, Sloan was selected by the NFL's Atlanta Falcons in the 11th round of the 1966 NFL Draft. He played sparingly as a back-up over the course of two seasons. In his brief NFL career, he only appeared in eight games, and only one as a starter. During those eight games, he completed 10 of 31 passes, for no touchdowns and four interceptions.[5]

Coaching career

In 1971, Sloan received his first coaching job as an offensive coordinator for the Florida State Seminoles.[6] The following year, he moved to the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets for the same position.[6]

In 1973, Sloan took his first job as a head coach of the Vanderbilt Commodores.[7] In his first season, Vanderbilt finished at 5–6, including a 1–6 record in conference play. During his second season, however, Vanderbilt finished at 7–3–1 and qualified for a post-season bowl game. The team was placed in the Peach Bowl against the Texas Tech Red Raiders.[8] The two teams played to a 6–6 tie in the game.[9] It was Vanderbilt's first bowl game since 1955 and second in school history.

The Texas Tech University athletic department offered Sloan head football coaching position in January 1975. Though Sloan originally declined,[10][11] he took the job on January 2, 1975.[12] Texas Tech was believed to have offered him a US$30,000 per year contract, as well as $11,000 from television show income.[11] He took five of his assistant coaches with him to the Red Raiders program, including defensive coordinator Bill Parcells.[13] In his three seasons with Texas Tech, Sloan compiled a 23–12 record.

In late 1977, Sloan took his third head coaching job with the Ole Miss Rebels football program.[14] Sloan was head coach for five seasons at Ole Miss, winning 20 games, losing 34, and tying one. His best season came in 1978 when the Rebels finished at 5–6.

In December 1982, Sloan decided to leave Ole Miss to become the head football coach for the Duke Blue Devils football program.[15] In his first season at Duke, Sloan led the Blue Devils to a 3–8 record, despite beginning the season 0–7.[16] In his remaining three seasons, he compiled a 10–23 record before resigning. Steve Spurrier was named as his successor.[17]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Vanderbilt Commodores (Southeastern Conference) (1973–1974)
1973 Vanderbilt 5–6 1–5 10th
1974 Vanderbilt 7–3–2 2–3–1 T–7th T Peach
Vanderbilt: 12–9–2 3–8–1
Texas Tech Red Raiders (Southwest Conference) (1975–1977)
1975 Texas Tech 6–5 4–3 4th
1976 Texas Tech 10–2 7–1 T–1st L Astro-Bluebonnet 13 13
1977 Texas Tech 7–5 4–4 T–4th L Tangerine
Texas Tech: 23–12 15–8
Ole Miss Rebels (Southeastern Conference) (1978–1982)
1978 Ole Miss 5–6 2–4 T–7th
1979 Ole Miss 4–7 3–3 T–5th
1980 Ole Miss 3–8 2–5 7th
1981 Ole Miss 4–6–1 1–5–1 9th
1982 Ole Miss 4–7 0–6 T–9th
Ole Miss: 20–34–1 8–23–1
Duke Blue Devils (Atlantic Coast Conference) (1983–1986)
1983 Duke 3–8 3–4 T–5th
1984 Duke 2–9 1–6 T–7th
1985 Duke 4–7 2–5 T–6th
1986 Duke 4–7 2–5 T–6th
Duke: 13–31 8–20
Total: 68–86–3
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

Coaching tree

Assistant coaches under Steve Sloan who became NCAA or NFL head coaches:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Athletic director retires". The University Echo Online. February 9, 2006. Archived from the original on January 9, 2008. Retrieved September 20, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c Traughber, Bill (September 20, 2006). "The Commodore history corner". Vanderbilt University. Retrieved September 20, 2008.
  3. ^ "NO. 1 TEAM HALTED ON ONE-FOOT LINE; Koy Scores Twice, Once on 79-Yard Dash -- Namath Is Brilliant in Defeat". New York Times. January 2, 1965.
  4. ^ "University of Alabama official team statistics, 1965" (PDF). Retrieved May 2, 2010.
  5. ^ "Steve Sloan". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved May 2, 2010.
  6. ^ a b Holliman, Steve (December 21, 1977). "Sloan: taking the long road back to Alabama?". St. Petersburg Times. pp. C1.
  7. ^ "Vanderbilt names Sloan head coach". The Washington Post. February 15, 1973. pp. H4.
  8. ^ "Vanderbilt is named to play in Peach Bowl". Los Angeles Times. November 8, 1974. pp. D3.
  9. ^ "Vandy's defense stiffens for tie in Peach Bowl". Chicago Tribune. December 29, 1974. pp. B9.
  10. ^ "Texas Tech may name Sloan as new coach". Columbia Missourian. January 1, 1975.
  11. ^ a b "Sloan eyes Texas Tech offer". St. Petersburg Times. January 1, 1975. pp. C2.
  12. ^ "Sloan changes mind, accepts coaching job at Texas Tech". St. Petersburg Times. January 2, 1976. pp. C2.
  13. ^ "Football coaches on the move". St. Petersburg Times. January 14, 1975. pp. C2.
  14. ^ "Sloan leaves Texas Tech for Ole Miss". The Washington Post. December 2, 1977.
  15. ^ "Bear retires from Alabama sidelines". Deseret News. December 16, 1982. pp. 2D. ... who just left the University of Mississippi for the head coaching job at Duke.
  16. ^ "Coaching Records Game by Game: 1983". College Football DataWarehouse. Retrieved September 20, 2008.
  17. ^ "Spurrier takes over for Sloan at Duke". San Jose Mercury News. January 23, 1987.

Further reading

  • Sloan, Steve; James C. Hefley (1967). Calling Life's Signals: The Steve Sloan Story. Zondervan Pub. House.
  • Sloan, Steve (1975). A Whole New Ball Game. Broadman Press. ISBN 0-8054-5559-0.

External links

1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 1965 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1965 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 71st overall and 32nd season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season with nine wins, one loss and one tie (9–1–1 overall, 6–1–1 in the SEC), as SEC champions and with a victory over Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. Alabama was also recognized as national champions by the AP Poll after their Orange Bowl win.

Alabama opened the season ranked No. 5, but were upset by Georgia 18–17 in the first game of the season. They rebounded with their first win of the season over Tulane and followed that with a 17–16 win over Ole Miss in a game in which Alabama had to rally from a nine-point fourth quarter deficit for the victory. The next week, the Crimson Tide defeated Vanderbilt in Nashville before they returned home for their rivalry game against Tennessee. Against the Volunteers, the score was deadlocked 7–7 in the closing seconds, but Alabama had driven to the Tennessee four-yard line. Ken Stabler believing that it was third down, threw the ball out of bounds with six seconds left to stop the clock. However, it was actually fourth down, possession went to Tennessee, and the game ended in a tie.

After the tie, the Crimson Tide won five in a row over Florida State, Mississippi State, LSU, South Carolina and Auburn en route to Bryant's fourth SEC title at Alabama. Because the Associated Press was holding its vote until after the bowl games instead of before for the first time, No. 4 Alabama still had a chance to win the national championship when they played No. 3 Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. On New Year's Day, No. 1 Michigan State lost in the Rose Bowl and No. 2 Arkansas lost in the Cotton Bowl Classic, and Alabama defeated Nebraska 39–28 in the Orange Bowl and captured its third AP National Championship in five years.

1971 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1971 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University in the 1971 NCAA University Division football season. Larry Jones was head coach, Steve Sloan was an assistant coach/offensive coordinator, and Bill Parcells coached the linebackers.

1973 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

The 1973 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University in the 1973 NCAA Division I football season. The Commodores were led by head coach Steve Sloan in his first season and finished the season with a record of five wins and six losses (5–6 overall, 1–5 in the SEC).

1974 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

The 1974 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University in the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. The Commodores scored 313 points while allowing 199 points. Led by head coach Steve Sloan, the Commodores had their best record since 1955 and appeared in the school's second bowl game. Vanderbilt did not return to a bowl game until 1982.

1975 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

The 1975 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team represented Texas Tech University in the Southwest Conference during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. In their first season under head coach Steve Sloan, the Red Raiders compiled a 6–5 record (4–3 against conference opponents), finished in fourth place in the conference, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 272 to 251. The team's statistical leaders included Tommy Duniven with 1,038 passing yards, Larry Isaac with 751 rushing yards, and Sammy Williams with 496 receiving yards. The team played its home games at Clifford B. & Audrey Jones Stadium.

1975 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

The 1975 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University in the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The team was led by head coach Fred Pancoast, who replaced Steve Sloan. In 1974, Sloan had led Vanderbilt to a bowl game for the first time since 1955, before leaving to become head coach at Texas Tech, the team Vanderbilt had faced in the Peach Bowl to close the season. The Vanderbilt squad finished the season with a record of 7–4, but was not invited to a bowl game. Three of the Commodores's four defeats came by margins of more than 30 points while all seven of their victors were by ten or fewer points.

1977 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

The 1977 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team represented Texas Tech University in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. In their third and final season under head coach Steve Sloan, the Red Raiders compiled a 7–5 record (4–4 against SWC opponents), outscored opponents by a combined total of 279 to 246, and finished in a tie for fourth place in the conference. The team played its home games at Clifford B. and Audrey Jones Stadium in Lubbock, Texas.

1978 Ole Miss Rebels football team

The 1978 Ole Miss Rebels football team represented the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) during the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Steve Sloan, in his first year, and they played their home games at Hemingway Stadium in Oxford, Mississippi and Mississippi Memorial Stadium in Jackson, Mississippi. Some of the outstanding players on the team of that year were Bobby Garner, Leon Perry, Reginald Woullard, Roy Coleman, Freddie Williams, etc. They finished the season with a record of five wins and six losses (5–6, 2–5 SEC).

1979 Ole Miss Rebels football team

The 1979 Ole Miss Rebels football team represented the University of Mississippi during the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1993 UCF Golden Knights football team

The 1993 UCF Golden Knights football season was Gene McDowell's ninth as the head coach of the Golden Knights. Earning their eighth winning season in 1993, with a 9–3 overall record, UCF made the playoffs for the second time in four years. Also during the season, the Golden Knights won their first game over a Division I-A team, a 38–16 victory over Louisiana Tech.

Starting in 1993 (and continuing through the 2006 season), the program was nicknamed the "Golden Knights." Before 1993 (and since 2007), UCF's sports programs were simply known as the "Knights." The name change was proposed in 1993 by then athletic director Steve Sloan as a way to boost the popularity of the program and to boost merchandise sales.At 6-1 by late October, it was the best start in school history. Their only loss early on was to East Carolina, a Division I-A team. The Golden Knights won three of their last four regular season games, finished 9-2-0 and advanced to the Division I-AA Playoffs. The Golden Knights were defeated in the first round by Jim Tressel's Youngstown State Penguins by the score of 56-30. The Penguins would go on to win the 1993 Division I-AA championship.

Barry Van Dyke

Barry Van Dyke (born July 31, 1951) is an American actor and the second son of actor and entertainer Dick Van Dyke and Margie Willett, and nephew of Jerry Van Dyke. He has often worked with his father. He is best known to audiences as Lieutenant Detective Steve Sloan, a homicide detective and the son of Dr. Mark Sloan (played by Dick Van Dyke) on Diagnosis: Murder. In the show, the characters' relatives were frequently played by real-life family members.

List of Atlanta Falcons starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Falcons.

List of Texas Tech Red Raiders head football coaches

The Texas Tech Red Raiders football program is a college football team that represents Texas Tech University in the Big 12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 15 head coaches, and two interim head coach, since it began play during the 1925 season.

Texas Tech (then known as Texas Technological College) was known as the "Matadors" from 1925 to 1936, a name suggested by the wife of Ewing Y. Freeland, the first football coach, to reflect the influence of the Spanish Renaissance architecture on campus. In 1932, Texas Tech joined the Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The school's short-lived Matadors moniker was replaced officially in 1937 with "Red Raiders", the nickname the team has had ever since. The same year, Pete Cawthon, Texas Tech's third head coach, led the team to their first conference championship and bowl game berth, a 7–6 loss to the West Virginia Mountaineers in the Sun Bowl. Texas Tech suffered four more bowl losses, under two head coaches, before their first postseason win in the 1952 Sun Bowl, under first-year head coach DeWitt Weaver. Before withdrawing from the Border Conference in 1956, the Red Raiders won nine conference championships, the most held by a Border Conference member. Weaver and his predecessor Dell Morgan each won four conference championships, a record for a Texas Tech head coach.

In 1960, Texas Tech was admitted to the Southwest Conference. The Red Raiders won two conference championships in 1976 and 1994, under head coaches Steve Sloan and Spike Dykes respectively. Texas Tech became a charter member in the South Division of the Big 12 Conference in 1996 when the Southwest Conference disbanded. During his ninth season as head coach, Mike Leach led Texas Tech to the program's first division championship in 2008. After Leach was fired at the end of the 2009 season, Ruffin McNeill was named interim head coach for the Alamo Bowl. Tommy Tuberville coached the Red Raiders from 2010 to 2012, resigning after the conclusion of the regular season. Kliff Kingsbury, a former standout quarterback at Texas Tech, coached the Red Raider from 2013 to 2018.. The current coach, Matt Wells, was hired on

November 29, 2018. He was previously the head coach of the Utah State Aggies before being hired on at Texas Tech..

List of Vanderbilt Commodores head football coaches

The Vanderbilt Commodores college football team represents Vanderbilt University in the East Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Commodores compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 28 head coaches since it began play during the 1890 season.The team has played 1,250 games over 126 seasons of Vanderbilt football. In that time, six coaches have led the Commodores to postseason bowl games: Arthur Guepe, Steve Sloan, George MacIntyre, Bobby Johnson, James Franklin and Derek Mason. Four other coaches won conference championships: R. G. Acton, Walter H. Watkins, James H. Henry and Dan McGugin. Between them, the coaches won eleven Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association championships; McGugin led the team to an additional two titles as a member of the Southern Conference.McGugin is the leader in seasons coached and games won, with 198 victories during his 30 years at Vanderbilt. E. H. Alley has the highest winning percentage with 1.000. Robbie Caldwell has the lowest winning percentage with .167. Of the 28 different head coaches who have led the Commodores, McGugin, Ray Morrison, Henry Russell Sanders, and Bill Edwards have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana.

Rex Dockery

John "Rex" Dockery (February 7, 1942 – December 12, 1983) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Texas Tech University from 1978 to 1980 and at Memphis State University, now the University of Memphis, from 1981 to 1983, compiling a career college football record of 23–40–3. Dockery was killed in a plane crash in 1983.

Rodney Allison

Rodney Allison (born January 29, 1956) is an American former college football player and coach. He is currently the director of the Texas Tech letterman's organization, the Double T Varsity Club.He was the former head football coach of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, holding the position from 2003 to 2008. He guided the Mocs to a 17–51 overall record. Allison is a graduate of Texas Tech University, receiving a bachelor's degree in Physical Education, where he played as the starting quarterback on the Texas Tech Red Raiders football team.

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