Steve Pelluer

Steven Carl Pelluer (born July 29, 1962) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Kansas City Chiefs. He was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the 5th round of the 1984 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Washington.

Steve Pelluer
No. 16, 11
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:July 29, 1962 (age 56)
Yakima, Washington
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:204 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school:Interlake (WA)
College:Washington
NFL Draft:1984 / Round: 5 / Pick: 113
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:65
TD-INT:29–39
Passing yards:6,870
QB Rating:71.6
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Pelluer attended Interlake High School in Washington and lettered in football and basketball. In football, he led his team to the state quarterfinals in his last two years. As a senior, he received All-state honors and was a National Football Foundation Scholar-Athlete.

He accepted a football scholarship from the University of Washington. As a sophomore in 1981, he took over the starting quarterback position, after Tim Cowan injured his thumb in the second game of the season. He finished with 110 of 234 completions, for 1,138 yards and 9 touchdowns, while leading the team to a Pacific-10 Conference title and a 28–0 win over the University of Iowa in the 1982 Rose Bowl.

In 1982, even though his record was 7–1, he lost his starting job to Cowan. In 1983, he had one of the best quarterback seasons in school history, receiving All-Pac-10 and the conference's offensive player of the year honors, after completing a 67.2% of his passes (school record) for 2,365 yards and 11 touchdowns.[1] He also set a school record with most consecutive passes completed (137) without an interception.

He left as the school's second career leader in passing yards with 4,603 passing yards, to go along with 436 completions (school record), 30 touchdowns, 342 rushing yards and a 23–6 record.

Professional career

Dallas Cowboys

Pelluer was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the fifth round (113th overall) of the 1984 NFL Draft. He was the third-string quarterback in his first two years. In 1985, with the first place in the NFC East division at stake, he was forced to enter a close game against the New York Giants and make his career debut, because both starting quarterback Danny White and backup Gary Hogeboom had been injured. Pelluer on his second series directed a 72-yard drive (which included a third-and-15 conversion) for the winning touchdown, leading the Cowboys to a victory that clinched the division title.[2][3]

In 1986, he was named the backup quarterback after Hogeboom was traded. When White suffered a season-ending injury in week 9 against the New York Giants, Pelluer nearly rallied the team after completing 28-of-38 passes for 339 yards. He started 6 out of the last 7 games, showing a strong arm and great mobility. Against the Seattle Seahawks, he set the franchise record for consecutive passes completed (14) without an incompletion. He finished with a 1–6 record and was sacked 47 times in 9 starts.

In 1987, he began as a backup, but took over White in week 10 against the Miami Dolphins and started 4 out of the last 6 games. He finished with 94 straight passes without throwing an interception.

In 1988, at a low point in franchise history, he started 14 of the 16 games, passing for 3,139 yards, 17 touchdowns, rushing for 314 yards (second on the team) and 2 touchdowns, but the team finished just 3–13 (3–11 in his starts). In the seventh game against the Chicago Bears, while sliding feet first, a fierce hit by linebacker Mike Singletary forced him to leave the game with a concussion.[4]. In the eighth game against the Philadelphia Eagles, he completed 32 (second in team history) out of 46 passes for 342 yards. In the fifteenth game against the Washington Redskins, he passed for 333 yards and 3 touchdowns. He was the last quarterback to start and win a game for a Tom Landry-coached team and became one of only 3 quarterbacks in franchise history to pass for more than 3,000 yards in a season, joining Roger Staubach (2 times) and Danny White (4 times).

The next year, he asked to be traded, after Jimmy Johnson was hired as the new head coach and drafted two rookie quarterbacks (Troy Aikman and Steve Walsh).[5] On October 17, 1989, he was traded to the Kansas City Chiefs in exchange for a third round draft choice in 1990 (#68-Ron Lewis) and a fourth round draft choice in 1991 (#106-Bill Musgrave).[6]

Kansas City Chiefs

In 1989, he appeared in 5 regular season games with 3 starts. On November 5, he led his team to a 20–10 win against the Seattle Seahawks and tied a franchise record for rushing yards (69) by a quarterback.[7]

In 1990, he appeared in 13 games with no starts, after Steve DeBerg established himself as the team starter during the preseason.

On August 7, 1991, he walked out of training camp, before returning on August 19.[8] He was released on August 27 and later re-signed on December 17 to back up Mark Vlasic after DeBerg was injured.[9]

Denver Broncos

In 1992, he was signed in Plan B free agency by the Denver Broncos and was cut on August 18, before the start of the season.[10][11]

Winnipeg Blue Bombers

In 1995, Pelluer signed with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Canadian Football League after being out of football for three years.[12] He was lost for the season after dislocating his shoulder in the second game against the Birmingham Barracudas.

Frankfurt Galaxy

In 1996, he played with the Frankfurt Galaxy of the World League of American Football, reuniting with head coach Ernie Stautner, who was the defensive coordinator with the Dallas Cowboys. Pelluer was one of the three top quarterbacks in the league and helped his team reach the World Bowl. He returned the next year, but was a reserve player, before deciding to retire at the end of the season.

Personal life

Pelluer's brother, Scott Pelluer, attended Washington State University and played linebacker for the New Orleans Saints.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Penn State, Washington take similarities to Aloha". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  2. ^ Friend, Tom (November 15, 1986). "Their Passes Once Crossed in a Pick-Up Game : Steve Pelluer: Now He's Receiving Ayes From Dallas". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  3. ^ "Dawg Days are over for Pelluer". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  4. ^ "Bears' Defense, Rookies Big Hits". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  5. ^ Condotta, Bob (October 11, 2002). "Catching up with Steve Pelluer". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  6. ^ "Pelluer traded to Kansas City". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  7. ^ "Okoye, Pelluer Power Chiefs Past Seahawks". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  8. ^ "Pelluer wants back with Chiefs". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  9. ^ "Chiefs re-sign Pelluer". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  10. ^ Condotta, Bob (October 11, 2002). "Catching up with Steve Pelluer". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  11. ^ "Browncos waive Pelluer; Redskins, Howard close". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  12. ^ "Old rival Winnipeg -- back but not the same". Retrieved January 13, 2018.
1981 Washington Huskies football team

The 1981 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season. In its seventh season under head coach Don James, the team compiled a 10–2 record, finished in first place in the Pacific-10 Conference, defeated Iowa in the 1981 Rose Bowl, and outscored its opponents by a combined total of 281 to 171. Mark Jerue was selected as the team's most valuable player. Jerue, James Carter, Vince Coby, and Fletcher Jenkins were the team captains.

1982 Rose Bowl

The 1982 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game, played on January 1, 1982. It was the 68th Rose Bowl Game. The Washington Huskies defeated the Iowa Hawkeyes by a score of 28–0. Washington freshman Jacque Robinson gained 142 yards on 20 carries and set up or scored three of the Huskies' four touchdowns and was named player of the game. Washington quarterback Steve Pelluer was 15 for 29 passing, end Paul Skansi had four big catches and Mark Jerue made 13 tackles as linebacker.

1983 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1983 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1983 college football season.

1983 Washington Huskies football team

The 1983 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. In its ninth season under head coach Don James, the team compiled an 8–4 record, finished in second place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and outscored its opponents by a combined total of 285 to 178. Steve Pelluer was selected as the team's most valuable player. Pelluer, Dean Browning, Stewart Hill, and Rick Mallory were the team captains.

1986 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1986 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League. The team finished the regular season at 7–9 and finishing with a losing record for the first time since 1964.

1988 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1988 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 29th season in the National Football League. They failed to improve on their 7–8 record from 1987, finishing at 3-13 and missing the playoffs for the third consecutive season. Also this was the final year for Cowboys head coach Tom Landry.

Bart Hendricks

Bart Hendricks (born August 30, 1978) is a former American and Canadian football quarterback. He played for the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League. He played college football at Boise State.

Cotton Davidson

Francis Marion "Cotton" Davidson (born November 30, 1931) is a former American football quarterback and punter.

Damon Huard

Damon Paul Huard (born July 9, 1973) is a former American football quarterback. He is the director of community relations and fundraiser for the University of Washington football program, his alma mater.Huard was signed by the Cincinnati Bengals as an undrafted free agent in 1996, and played twelve seasons in the NFL with the Miami Dolphins, New England Patriots, and Kansas City Chiefs. While with the Patriots, he won two Super Bowl rings.

Danny White

Wilford Daniel White (born February 9, 1952) is a former quarterback and punter for the Dallas Cowboys and an American football coach in the Arena Football League. He has been the color commentator for Cowboys games on Compass Media Networks' America's Team Radio Network since the 2011 season. He played college football at Arizona State University.

Eddie Wilson (American football)

Edward Adair Wilson (born August 14, 1940 in Redding, California) is a former American football quarterback and punter in the American Football League. He played collegiately at Arizona and professionally for the Dallas Texans, the Kansas City Chiefs, and the Boston Patriots. He coached for Arizona, Army, Cornell, Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Wake Forest, and the Kansas City Chiefs.

Hunter Enis

George Hunter Enis (born December 10, 1936 in Fort Worth, Texas) is a former American collegiate and Professional Football quarterback who played for three seasons in the American Football League. He played for the Dallas Texans in 1960, the San Diego Chargers in 1961, and the Oakland Raiders and the Denver Broncos in 1962. He played college football at Texas Christian University, and currently serves on their Board of Trustees.

List of Dallas Cowboys starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Cowboys.

List of Kansas City Chiefs starting quarterbacks

The Kansas City Chiefs are a professional American football team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The Chiefs are a member of the Western Division of the American Football Conference in the National Football League (NFL). Originally named the Dallas Texans, the club was founded by Lamar Hunt in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League. In 1963, the team moved to Kansas City, Missouri and were renamed the Kansas City Chiefs.

The Chiefs have had 37 different quarterbacks start at least one game in their franchise's history, 21 of which have started at least 10 games. Cotton Davidson was the team's first starting quarterback; he played all 14 games for the Texans in their inaugural 1960 season. Davidson played with the franchise from 1960 to 1962, and was traded in 1963 to the Oakland Raiders. Len Dawson signed with on July 2, 1962 and played for the franchise for 14 seasons. With Dawson as the team's starter, the Texans/Chiefs won three American Football League championships and appeared in two Super Bowl championship games. Dawson was named Most Valuable Player after the Chiefs' victory in Super Bowl IV and retired in 1975 with several franchise records. Three quarterbacks currently in the Pro Football Hall of Fame have started at least one game for Kansas City: Dawson, Joe Montana, and Warren Moon. In the 2008 season, the Chiefs started three quarterbacks: Brodie Croyle, Damon Huard, and Tyler Thigpen. After Croyle and Huard were sidelined by injuries, Thigpen played in eleven games, winning one and losing ten. In 2009 and 2010, Matt Cassel started 15 of 16 games each season, while Croyle started the other 2 games.

List of Washington Huskies starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started for the Washington Huskies. They are listed in order of the date of each man's first start at quarterback.

Matt Stevens (quarterback)

Matthew Anthony Stevens (born July 30, 1964) is a former professional American football quarterback who played one season in the National Football League. He played for the Kansas City Chiefs following the 1987 NFL strike. He played in three games for the Chiefs, starting two of them. He played high school football at Fountain Valley High School and collegiate football at UCLA.

Washington Huskies football annual team awards

These are the Washington Huskies football annual team award recipients.

Washington Huskies football statistical leaders

The Washington Huskies football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Washington Huskies football program in various categories. The Huskies represent the University of Washington in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference. Washington's first football season was in 1889.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1920s, seasons have increased to 10 or more games.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

In 1975, the Pacific-8 Conference removed a restriction which limited the league's bowl game participation to a single representative tied to the Rose Bowl Game

The official NCAA record book does not include bowl games in statistical records until 2002, with most colleges also structure their record books this way.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

World Bowl '96

World Bowl '96 (also referred to as World Bowl IV) was the fourth championship game of the World League of American Football (WLAF). It took place at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland on Sunday, June 23, 1996. The 7–3 Scottish Claymores defeated the 7–3 Frankfurt Galaxy (the defending champions) 32–27 and, led by head coach Jim Criner, completed the league's first ever worst to first turnaround. Claymores wide receiver Yo Murphy was voted MVP for his 163 receiving yards and three touchdowns. 38,982 fans were in attendance that day, the highest in Claymores history and the largest crowd ever assembled for an American football game in Scotland.

Overall (1975–1982)
Offensive (1983–present)
Defensive (1983–present)
Freshman (1999–2008)
Freshman Offensive (2009–present)
Freshman Defensive (2009–present)

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