Steve Largent

Stephen Michael Largent (born September 28, 1954) is a former American football player, enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and a former Republican politician, having served in the U.S. House of Representatives for Oklahoma, from 1994 until 2002. Prior to his political career, Largent was a wide receiver for the Seattle Seahawks in the National Football League for his entire 14-season professional football career. He held several all-time receiving records when he retired.

Steve Largent
Stevelargent
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma's 1st district
In office
November 29, 1994 – February 15, 2002
Preceded byJim Inhofe
Succeeded byJohn Sullivan
Personal details
BornSeptember 28, 1954 (age 64)
Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Terry Largent
Children4
EducationUniversity of Tulsa (BS)

Football career
No. 80
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:187 lb (85 kg)
Career information
High school:Putnam City (OK)
College:Tulsa
NFL Draft:1976 / Round: 4 / Pick: 117
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:819
Receiving yards:13,089
Touchdowns:100
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Football career

NFL-Week02-SeaVSF001
Banners of Largent and the 12th Man hang over CenturyLink Field.

In 1974 at the University of Tulsa, Largent had 884 yards receiving and 14 touchdown catches. In 1975, he had 51 catches for 1,000 yards and 14 touchdown catches.

Despite an All-American career at Tulsa, Largent was not selected until the fourth round of the 1976 NFL Draft by the Houston Oilers (117th pick). After four preseason games, he was slated to be cut, but was instead traded to the expansion Seattle Seahawks for a 1977 eighth-round pick.

Largent spent 14 years with the Seahawks, and, while not particularly fast, was extremely sure-handed. He became the first Seahawk selected to the Pro Bowl in 1978, and was selected six more times during his career. In 1979 he led the league in receiving yards with 1,237, and six years later did it again with 1,287 in 1985. In 1987, Largent ended his participation in the NFLPA strike after the third and final week of the strike. With the retirement of Charlie Joiner the previous year, Largent became the NFL's active leader in career receiving yards, retaining that lead until his retirement in 1989. He broke Joiner's all-time record for receiving yards (12,146) in Week 3 of 1988.

In 1989, Largent became the first Seahawks player to win the Steve Largent Award for his spirit, dedication, and integrity.[1]

During his playing career Largent was given the nickname Yoda for his ability to catch anything thrown at him.[2]

When Largent retired, he held all major NFL receiving records, including: most receptions in a career (819), most receiving yards in a career (13,089), and most touchdown receptions (100). He was also in possession of a then-record streak of 177 consecutive regular-season games with a reception. He also holds the distinction as the first receiver in NFL history to achieve 100 touchdown receptions in his career.

Largent was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1995, his first year of eligibility. In 1999, he was ranked number 46 on The Sporting News list of the 100 Greatest Football Players, the only Seahawk to make the list.

His #80 was retired in 1992; Largent is the first Seahawk player to be so honored. During Jerry Rice's stint with the Seahawks in 2004, Largent's #80 was temporarily "unretired" after a conversation between Rice and Largent that was reportedly initiated by then Seahawks president Bob Whitsitt.[3] Largent remains the most prolific receiver in team history. On October 26, 2008, Largent's University of Tulsa #83 was also retired.[4]

Career receiving statistics

Year Team Games Rec Yards Y/R TDs
1976 SEA 13 54 705 13.1 4
1977 SEA 14 33 643 19.5 10
1978 SEA 16 71 1,168 16.5 8
1979 SEA 15 66 1,237 18.7 9
1980 SEA 16 66 1,064 16.1 6
1981 SEA 16 75 1,224 16.3 9
1982 SEA 8 34 493 14.5 3
1983 SEA 15 72 1,074 14.9 11
1984 SEA 16 74 1,164 15.7 12
1985 SEA 16 79 1,287 16.3 6
1986 SEA 16 70 1,070 15.3 9
1987 SEA 13 58 912 15.7 8
1988 SEA 15 39 645 16.5 2
1989 SEA 10 28 403 14.4 3
Career 200 819 13,089 16.0 100

[5]

Political career

In 1994, Oklahoma's 1st District Congressman Jim Inhofe resigned to run in a special election to succeed Senator David Boren. Largent won the election to succeed Inhofe in Congress; pursuant to an Oklahoma statute, Governor David Walters designated the special election in which Largent was elected to serve the remainder of Inhofe's term in the 103rd Congress before beginning his term in the 104th Congress.[6][7]

Largent took office on November 29, 1994 and was reelected to the three succeeding Congresses, never winning less than 60 percent of the vote in the heavily Republican Tulsa-based district.[8][9][10]

Like many in the Republican freshman class elected in 1994, when the Republicans took control of the House for the first time in 40 years, Largent's voting record was solidly conservative. Largent was one of the "true believers" in that freshman class, devoting most of his time to issues important to the conservative Christians.

One of his first bills was a "parental rights" bill that died in committee after it attracted opposition even from other Christian conservatives. Another of his bills would have abolished the federal tax code at the end of 2001. He opposed ending the 1995 federal government shutdown and played a role in the failed attempt to oust Newt Gingrich as Speaker. Largent introduced a bill that would ban adoptions by gay and lesbian parents in Washington, D. C.

He was accused of being anti-Catholic due to his line of questioning of a House of Representatives chaplain in 2000, though he denied this.[11]

After the Republicans lost five seats in the 1998 midterm elections, Largent tried to take advantage of discontent with Majority Leader Dick Armey by challenging Armey for the post. Although Armey was not popular in the Republican caucus, Largent was thought to be far too conservative for the liking of some moderate Republicans, and Armey won on the third ballot.[12] However, when Bob Livingston of Louisiana stood down as Speaker-elect, Armey was still too wounded to make a bid for the job.

Largent decided to run for Governor of Oklahoma in 2002. He easily won the Republican nomination and resigned his House seat on February 15 to devote his energy to the race. Initially seen as an overwhelming favorite against Democratic state senator Brad Henry, Largent lost to Henry by just under 7,000 votes.

Largent's loss has been attributed by analysts to factors that included:

  • The presence of a well-funded independent (Gary Richardson, a former Republican) on the general election ballot;[13]
  • Henry's support of cockfighting, garnering a last minute endorsement by rural cockfighting interests that turned out in large numbers in the election in which the legality of cockfighting was on the ballot;[13][14][15]
  • Largent used a vulgarity, "bullshit" in response to an Oklahoma City television reporter who repeatedly asked where he was at the time of the September 11, 2001 attacks. Largent had been on a hunting trip and did not know about the attacks until then.[14][16]

Post-political career

Largent became President and CEO of CTIA-The Wireless Association in November 2003 until May 2014. CTIA is an international nonprofit membership organization founded in 1984, representing all sectors of wireless communications: cellular, personal communication services, and enhanced specialized mobile radio.[17][18]

Personal life

People magazine named Largent to its 1996 list of "Most Beautiful People".[19]

Largent has a son Kramer James (b. November 11, 1985) with spina bifida. He and his wife, Terry, also had three more children, sons Kyle and Kelly and daughter Casie.[20]

Electoral history

Oklahoma's 1st congressional district: Results 1994–2000[21]
Year Democratic Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
1994 Stuart Price 63,753 37% Steve Largent 107,085 63%
1996 Randolph John Amen 57,996 28% Steve Largent 143,415 68% Karla Condray Independent 8,996 4%
1998 Howard Plowman 56,309 38% Steve Largent 91,031 62%
2000 Dan Lowe 58,493 29% Steve Largent 138,528 69% Michael A. Clem Libertarian 2,984 1%
Summary of the November 5, 2002 Oklahoma gubernatorial election results
Candidates Party Votes %
  Brad Henry Democratic Party 448,143 43.27%
  Steve Largent Republican Party 441,277 42.61%
  Gary Richardson Independent 146,200 14.12%
Total 1,035,620 100.0%
Source: 2002 Election Results

References

  1. ^ Booth, Tim (December 19, 2008). Holmgren given Largent Award by players. KomoNews.com. Retrieved July 21, 2016.
  2. ^ Davis, Nate (October 23, 2015). "Seahawks great Steve Largent was nicknamed for 'Star Wars' character". USA Today. Retrieved October 23, 2015.
  3. ^ Greg Bishop, "Hawks offered No. 80, Rice says", Seattle Times, October 29, 2004.
  4. ^ Mike Brown, "TU honors standouts", Tulsa World, October 27, 2008.
  5. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/L/LargSt00.htm
  6. ^ LARGENT, Steve, (1954– ). bioguide.congress.gov
  7. ^ Jim Myers, "Largent Takes Oath of Office", Tulsa World, November 30, 1994.
  8. ^ "Oklahoma State Election Board". General Election Results. November 5, 1996
  9. ^ "Oklahoma State Election Board". General Election Results. November 3, 1998
  10. ^ "Oklahoma State Election Board". General Election Results. November 7, 2000
  11. ^ David van Biema, Catholic Bashing?, TIME, February 27, 2000.
  12. ^ Guy Gugliotta and Juliet Eilperin. House Republicans Embrace Livingston, Armey, Watts. Washington Post, November 19, 1998.
  13. ^ a b David Averill, "Eyeing another campaign: Richardson had impact on 2002 governor's race", Tulsa World, March 22, 2009.
  14. ^ a b "Henry upsets Steve Largent in governor's race", AP at USA Today, November 5, 2002.
  15. ^ John M. Broder, "The 2002 Elections: Governors; Bright Spots, Amid Dim Ones, for Democrats", New York Times, November 7, 2009.
  16. ^ Chris Cilliza, "The Fix: Holtz for House: The Strange History of Sports Stars and Politics", Washington Post, August 4, 2009.
  17. ^ Matt Richtel, "In the Hall as a Lobbyist After Time in the House", New York Times, March 22, 2004.
  18. ^ President & CEO Steve Largent at CTIA website.
  19. ^ "Steve Largent", People, May 6, 1996.
  20. ^ "Largent scandal fans flames of fame". seattlepi.com. Retrieved January 9, 2016.
  21. ^ "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Archived from the original on July 25, 2007. Retrieved August 8, 2007.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jim Inhofe
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Oklahoma's 1st congressional district

1994–2002
Succeeded by
John Sullivan
Party political offices
Preceded by
Trent Lott
Response to the State of the Union address
1999
Served alongside: Jennifer Dunn
Succeeded by
Susan Collins
Bill Frist
Preceded by
Frank Keating
Republican nominee for Governor of Oklahoma
2002
Succeeded by
Ernest Istook
1973 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team

The 1973 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team represented the University of Tulsa during the 1973 NCAA Division I football season. In their second year under head coach F. A. Dry, the Golden Hurricane compiled a 6–5 record, 5–1 against conference opponents, and won the Missouri Valley Conference co-championship.The team's statistical leaders included Joe McCulley with 1,579 passing yards, Freddie Carolina with 540 rushing yards, and Steve Largent with 501 receiving yards. Largent went on to play 14 years in the National Football League and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1974 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team

The 1974 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team represented the University of Tulsa during the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. In their third year under head coach F. A. Dry, the Golden Hurricane compiled an 8–3 record, 6–0 against Missouri Valley Conference opponents, and won the conference championship.The team's statistical leaders included Jeb Blount with 1,831 passing yards, Thomas Bailey with 456 rushing yards, and Steve Largent with 884 receiving yards. Largent went on to play 14 years in the National Football League and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1975 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team

The 1975 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team represented the University of Tulsa during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. In their fourth year under head coach F. A. Dry, the Golden Hurricane compiled a 7–4 record, 4–0 against Missouri Valley Conference opponents, and won the conference championship.The team's statistical leaders included Jeb Blount with 1,663 passing yards, Carlisle Cantrell with 914 rushing yards, and Steve Largent with 1,000 receiving yards. Largent went on to play 14 years in the National Football League and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Punter Rick Engles was selected as a first-team All-American by The Sporting News and Time magazine.

1981 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1981 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's sixth season with the National Football League. The Seahawks get off to a terrible start losing six of their first seven games, on the way to a 6-10 season. Steve Largent would have a stellar season with 1,224 receiving yards. Seattle opened their season at Cincinnati, and held a 21-0 lead before the Bengals rallied for an improbable 27-21 win. This loss proved to be the beginning of the end for the Seahawks in 1981, as they would struggle as the season progressed.

1984 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1984 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's ninth season with the National Football League. The season opener was moved from Sunday to Monday afternoon on Labor Day to avoid a conflict with the Seattle Mariners baseball game.

The 1984 Seahawks were a well-balanced team on offense and defense. They scored 418 points (26.1 per game), and gave up only 282 points (17.6 per game), both ranked 5th in the NFL. Their point differential of +136 points was third in the NFL; the Seahawks' giveaway/takeway ratio was +24, best in the league. The team's 63 defensive takeaways is the most in NFL history for a 16-game schedule, and the most since the merger.The team's offense boasted a 3,000-yard passer in quarterback Dave Krieg (3,671 yards), and a 1,000-yard wide receiver in Steve Largent (74 receptions for 1,164 yards). The passing attack more than made up for the loss of star running back Curt Warner, who suffered a season-ending knee injury in the opener.

The Seahawks's defensive line generated an outstanding pass rush, with defensive ends Jeff Bryant and Jacob Green registering 14.5 and 13 sacks, respectively. Safety Kenny Easley led the team and league with 10 interceptions. Easley, Green, and NT Joe Nash made the All-Pro team.

In a wild Week Ten game against Kansas City, the Seahawks intercepted Kansas City's quarterbacks five times, and returned four of them for touchdowns. All the touchdown returns were for over 50 yards. In the game, the Seahawks set NFL records for most yards returning interceptions (325), and most interceptions-for-touchdowns in a game (four). Seattle would make the playoffs for the second straight season. They defeated the defending Super Bowl champion Los Angeles Raiders 13-7 in the wild card round. However, they were not able to advance past the Miami Dolphins, as they lost in Miami 31-10 to a powerful Dolphins squad.

1985 All-Pro Team

The 1985 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News in 1985. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

Pro Football Weekly, which suspended operations in 1985, did not choose an All-Pro team.

1987 All-Pro Team

The 1987 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1987. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1987 NEA went with a 3-4 format for their All-Pro defense.

1989 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1989 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's 14th season with the National Football League. The season marked the end of an era for the team, as the last original Seahawk remaining, wide receiver Steve Largent, retired after the season as the NFL's all-time reception leader up to that time.

1990 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1990 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's 15th season with the National Football League. The team improved on its 7-9 record from 1989, finishing 9-7. Despite the winning record, the Seahawks missed the postseason. Seattle would start the season 0-3 before abandoning the Run and Shoot Offense installed before the season and returning to the “Ground Chuck” Offense. Upon becoming a “run first” offense once again Running Back Derrick Fenner led the AFC in Rushing and Total Touchdowns with 14 (tied with Los Angeles Rams Running Back Cleveland Gary) and finishing second in the NFL in Total Touchdowns (leading the AFC in that category) with 15 (one behind Detroit Lions Running Back Barry Sanders 16 Total Touchdowns) The return to “Ground Chuck” led to them upsetting the Cincinnati Bengals at home on Monday Night Football 31-16 to pick up their first win of the season. After they traded wins and losses in their next 5 games, Seattle would win 3 straight to sit at 7-6. However, a loss to the Dolphins in Miami hurt the Seahawks hopes for a playoff berth. They won their final 2 games of the season against the Broncos and Lions to finish at 9-7 but were eliminated after the Houston Oilers (led by backup QB Cody Carlson subbing for an injured Warren Moon) defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers on the final Sunday Night Football game of 1990 due to conference record tiebreakers. The Oilers win sent Houston and the Cincinnati Bengals to the playoffs while a Pittsburgh win would’ve sent the Seahawks and Steelers to the postseason. This was the closest Seattle came to returning to the playoffs until missing them by a game in 1998 and was the last winning season by a Seattle team until their 1999 AFC West Championship team that also finished 9-7. Seattle Would bottom out at 2-14 two seasons later before becoming known as an also ran for the better part of the rest of the decade known by some players and fans as the “Forever 8 and 8 Era” where Seattle finished at or a game below .500 throughout Dennis Erickson’s tenure.

This was the first Seahawks season without original member Steve Largent, who retired at the end of the previous season. This season is also notable for Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Derrick Thomas sacking Seahawks quarterback Dave Krieg an NFL record 7 times in a single game. Despite this the Seahawks managed to pull out the win when Krieg broke free of what would have been another Thomas sack to throw the game winning touchdown to receiver Paul Skansi.

Seattle’s 1990 NFL Draft is notable in that they not only acquired a future Pro-Football Hall of Famer in Cortez Kennedy but they grabbed multiple time ProBowl RB Chris Warren in the 4th Round. Warren would play in Seattle until the end of the 1997 Season becoming Seattle’s All-Time Leading Rusher on his final carry as a Seahawk passing Seahawks Ring of Honor Member Curt Warner with 6,706 to Warner’s 6,705 (since broken by Shaun Alexander’s 9,429 Rushing Yards as a Seahawk.). As well as ProBowl Defensive Back Robert Blackmon and Defensive mainstay Terry Wooden. Next to the 1997 NFL Draft where the Seahawks netted HoFer Walter Jones and multiple time ProBowler Shawn Springs and the 2012 NFL Draft where Seattle acquired Bobby Wagner and Russell Wilson this is considered one of best drafts in Seattle history in terms of leaguewide impact players and career honors and accolades. Kennedy would become the first player drafted by the Seahawks to make the Hall of Fame as Steve Largent was taken by the Houston Oilers in the 1976 NFL Draft never playing a down for them before joining Seattle in it’s Expansion Season of 1976.

1999 State of the Union Address

The 1999 State of the Union address was given by President Bill Clinton to a joint session of the 106th United States Congress on Tuesday, January 19, 1999. The speech was the third State of the Union address of President Clinton's second term. This was the first State of the Union address with Dennis Hastert as Speaker of the House of Representatives.

President Clinton discussed the economy, the federal budget, taxes and focused on the budget surplus, then at $70 billion. The president also discussed the future of Social Security, education, foreign relations and "solving the so-called Y2K computer problem". The president did not mention the then-occurring impeachment trial in the Senate.

The speech lasted 1:18:40 and consisted of 7,514 words. In the speech, the president acknowledged the widows of the officers killed in the United States Capitol shooting incident of 1998.

The Republican Party response was delivered by Representatives Jennifer Dunn and Steve Largent in Washington, D.C..Andrew Cuomo, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, served as the designated survivor.

2002 Oklahoma's 1st congressional district special election

The 2002 United States House of Representatives special election in Oklahoma's 1st congressional district was held on January 8, 2002 to select the successor to Steve Largent (R) who resigned to focus on his campaign for Governor of Oklahoma. Both of the major parties held primaries to determine their nominees. The Republican primary featured a competitive contest between then-First Lady of Oklahoma Cathy Keating, and state Senator Scott Pruitt, and the eventual winner state Representative John Sullivan. Sullivan subsequently defeated Tulsa School Board present Doug Dodd by a ten point margin.

Given the strong conservative bent of the district, which voted for George W. Bush over Al Gore 62% to 38% in 2000 and has not been represented by a Democrat since 1987, Democrats did not seriously contest this race.

2002 Oklahoma gubernatorial election

The Oklahoma gubernatorial election of 2002 was held on November 5, 2002, and was a race for the Governor of Oklahoma. Democrat Brad Henry won the election with 43 percent of the vote, beating Republican Steve Largent and conservative independent Gary Richardson.

Henry's narrow win has been attributed to Richardson and Largent's split of the conservative vote and the inclusion of a cockfighting ban on the ballot, an issue which brought cockfighting supporters from Southeastern Oklahoma, a traditional Democratic stronghold that strongly supported Henry, out to vote.

Howard Twilley

Howard James Twilley Jr. (born December 25, 1943) is a former American football player. He played college football at the University of Tulsa and was the runner up for the Heisman Trophy in 1965. Twilley played professionally as a wide receiver with the Miami Dolphins of the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL) from 1966 to 1976. He was the only player on the original 1966 Dolphins squad to play on the 1972 Dolphins team that had the NFL's only perfect season and won Super Bowl VII.

At Tulsa, Twilley set an NCAA record for the most receiving yards in a season (1,779), a record that stood until broken by Nevada's Alex Van Dyke in 1995. In 1992 Twilley was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Twilley finished his NFL career with 212 receptions for 3,064 yards and 23 touchdowns. He also caught a 28-yard touchdown pass in the Dolphins' Super Bowl VII win over the Washington Redskins.

After Twilley's football career ended, he pursued a career in business. He owned 28 The Athlete's Foot sporting goods stores before selling them in 1990, and worked in an investment firm. In 1994, he actively considered a run for the United States House of Representatives to succeed Jim Inhofe in Oklahoma's 1st congressional district when Inhofe decided to run for the United States Senate, but he ultimately decided to support the candidacy of another conservative Republican former NFL star, Steve Largent. He was inducted into the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame in 1995.

List of NCAA major college football yearly receiving leaders

The list of college football yearly receiving leaders identifies the major college receiving leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) receptions, (2) receiving yardage; (3) yards per reception; and (4) receiving touchdowns.

Eleven players have led the NCAA in one or more of these categories in multiple seasons. They are: Reid Moseley of Georgia (1944-1945); Hugh Campbell of Washington State (1960-1961); Vern Burke of Oregon State (1962-1963); Howard Twilley of Tulsa (1964-1965); Ron Sellers of Florida State (1967-1968); Jerry Hendren of Idaho (1968-1969); Mike Siani of Villanova (1970-1971); Steve Largent of Tulsa (1974-1975); Jason Phillips of Houston (1987-1988); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada (1994-1995); and Brennan Marion of Tulsa (2007-2008).

Since 1937, the NCAA record for receiving yards in a single season has been set or broken nine times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (814 yards); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (820 yards); Ed Barker of Washington State 1951 (864 yards); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1960 (881 yards); Vern Burke of Oregon State in 1962 (1,007 yards); Fred Biletnikoff of Florida State in 1964 (1,179 yards); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1965 (1,779 yards); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada in 1995 (1,854 yards); and Trevor Insley of Nevada in 1999 (2,060 yards).

During that same time, the record for receptions in a single season has been set or broken 13 times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (48); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (50); Barney Poole of Ole Miss in 1947 (52); Ed Brown of Fordham in 1952 (57); Dave Hibbert of Arizona in 1958 (61); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1962 (69); Larry Elkins of Baylor in 1963 (70); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1964 (95) and 1965 (134); Manny Hazard of Houston in 1989 (142); Freddie Barnes of Bowling Green in 2009 (155); and Zay Jones of East Carolina in 2016 (158).

List of Seattle Seahawks records

This article details statistics relating to the Seattle Seahawks NFL football team, including career, single season and game records.

Roy Lewis (American football)

Roy Lewis, Jr. (born May 19, 1985) is a former American football cornerback. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers as an undrafted free agent in 2008. He played college football at Washington. With the Steelers, he won Super Bowl XLIII against the Arizona Cardinals.

Steve Largent Award

The Steve Largent Award is given by the Seattle Seahawks annually to the team contributor(s) best exemplifying the spirit, dedication, and integrity of former Seahawk wide receiver Steve Largent.

Steve Largent—awards and honors

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