Steve Arlin

Steven Ralph Arlin (September 25, 1945 – August 17, 2016) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the San Diego Padres and Cleveland Indians for six seasons.[1]

Steve Arlin
Pitcher
Born: September 25, 1945
Seattle, Washington
Died: August 17, 2016 (aged 70)
San Diego, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 17, 1969, for the San Diego Padres
Last MLB appearance
September 14, 1974, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record34–67
Earned run average4.33
Strikeouts463
Teams

College Star

Born in Seattle, Arlin was a collegiate star at Ohio State University and was a star in the College World Series. In a 1965 semifinal game against Washington State, he struck out 20 batters in 15 innings, both CWS records, in a 1–0 complete game victory for the Buckeyes.[2] Ohio State, however, lost the final game to an Arizona State team that featured Rick Monday and Sal Bando. The following year in 1966, Arlin led Ohio State to the title and was named the CWS most valuable player.

In his two years with the Buckeyes, Arlin posted a 24–3 record with 294 strikeouts. His 165 strikeouts in 1965 remains an Ohio State single-season record; it and the career strikeout record had been set by Paul Ebert in the 1950s. Arlin's number 22 was the first to be retired by the Ohio State baseball team.

In 1978, Arlin was inducted into the Ohio State Varsity O Hall of Fame. In 2006, Arlin was a finalist for the first induction class of the College Baseball Hall of Fame. In 2008 he was inducted.

Minor Leagues

In 1966 the Philadelphia Phillies drafted Arlin in the first round (13th overall) in the secondary phase of the amateur draft. On July 25, 1967 he pitched a no-hitter in the Eastern League. Arlin also pitched in the Phillies’ farm system in 1968 before being selected by the San Diego Padres in the expansion draft.

Major Leagues

Pitching for a struggling young team, Arlin led the National League in losses in both 1971 and 1972 (19 and 21 respectively). In both seasons, however, he posted a earned run average: 3.48 in 1971 and 3.60 in 1972. The 1972 season was an especially curious one for Arlin: he pitched a one-hitter, three two-hitters (in one, on July 18 against the Phillies, he had a no-hitter broken up by Denny Doyle[3] with two out in the ninth—to date, the closest a Padre has come to pitching a no-hitter), and a 10-inning stint in which he allowed only one hit. Yet he finished 10–21. In 1973 Arlin recorded a personal best 11 victories against 14 losses, but with a 5.10 ERA—nearly a run and a half above his career ERA to that point.

Midway into the 1974 season, the Padres traded Arlin to the Cleveland Indians for two players to be named later. The Indians completed the trade a week later by sending pitchers Brent Strom and Terry Ley to the Padres. After closing out the season, Arlin, a dental student, retired from baseball and went into the dental profession. During his Major League career, Arlin won 34 games (11 of which were shutouts) while losing 67, with 463 strikeouts and a 4.33 earned run average in 788​23 innings pitched.

Arlin's grandfather, Harold Arlin, was the first broadcaster ever to call a game on radio, an August 5, 1921 game between the Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field.[4] Harold Arlin also broadcast the first-ever football game to be called over the radio months later, a college football game between Pitt and West Virginia.

Death

Arlin died in San Diego, California on August 17, 2016 at the age of 70.

See also

Sources

  1. ^ Obituary Archived 2016-09-03 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Buckeyes nip Cougar nine, face Arizona St. in finals". Spokane Daily Chronicle. June 11, 1965. p. 13.
  3. ^ Arlin misses no-hitter by a strike as ball bounces over Roberts' head
  4. ^ Associated Press (12 September 2006). "After 51 years, KDKA out as Pirates flagship station". ESPN.com. Retrieved 30 January 2009.

External links

1965 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1965 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1965 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1965 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its nineteenth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 23 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The nineteenth tournament's champion was Arizona State, coached by Bobby Winkles. The Most Outstanding Player was Sal Bando of Arizona State.

1965 Ohio State Buckeyes baseball team

The 1965 Ohio State Buckeyes baseball team represented the Ohio State University in the 1965 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached by Marty Karow in his 15th season at Ohio State.

The Buckeyes lost the College World Series, defeated by the Arizona State Sun Devils in the championship game.

1966 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1966 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1966 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1966 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twentieth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 28 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twentieth tournament's champion was Ohio State, coached by Marty Karow. The Most Outstanding Player was Steve Arlin of Ohio State.

1966 NCAA University Division baseball rankings

The following poll makes up the 1966 NCAA University Division baseball rankings. Collegiate Baseball Newspaper published its first human poll of the top 20 teams in college baseball in 1957, and expanded to rank the top 30 teams in 1961.

1966 NCAA University Division baseball season

The 1966 NCAA University Division baseball season, play of college baseball in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) began in the spring of 1966. The season progressed through the regular season and concluded with the 1965 College World Series. The College World Series, held for the twentieth time in 1966, consisted of one team from each of eight geographical districts and was held in Omaha, Nebraska at Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium as a double-elimination tournament. Ohio State claimed the championship.

1966 Ohio State Buckeyes baseball team

The 1966 Ohio State Buckeyes baseball team represented Ohio State University in the 1966 NCAA University Division baseball season. The team was coached by Marty Karow in his 16th season at Ohio State.

The Buckeyes won the College World Series, defeating the Oklahoma State Cowboys in the championship game.

1969 San Diego Padres season

The 1969 San Diego Padres season was the inaugural season in franchise history. They joined the National League along with the Montreal Expos via the 1969 Major League Baseball expansion. In their inaugural season, the Padres went 52–110 (the same record as their expansion counterpart), finishing last in the National League's newly created Western Division, 41 games behind the division champion Atlanta Braves.

1970 San Diego Padres season

The 1970 San Diego Padres season was the second season in franchise history.

1971 San Diego Padres season

The 1971 San Diego Padres season was the third season in franchise history.

1972 San Diego Padres season

The 1972 San Diego Padres season was the fourth season in franchise history.

1973 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1973 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 91st season in the history of the franchise. The team, managed by Danny Ozark, played their third season at Veterans Stadium and finished last in the National League East, 11​1⁄2 games behind the Mets.

1973 San Diego Padres season

The 1973 San Diego Padres season was the fifth season in franchise history.

1974 Cleveland Indians season

The 1974 Cleveland Indians season was the team's 74th season in Major League Baseball. It involved the Indians competing in the American League East, where they finished fourth with a record of 77–85.

1974 San Diego Padres season

The 1974 San Diego Padres season was the sixth in franchise history. The team finished last in the National League West with a record of 60–102, 42 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Danny Coombs

Daniel Bernard Coombs (born March 23, 1942 in Lincoln, Maine) is a former Major League Baseball relief pitcher who played from 1963 to 1971 for the Houston Colt .45s / Astros and San Diego Padres.

Coombs was 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) tall, weighed 210 pounds (95 kg), and he attended Seton Hall University. While he was at Seton Hall, he was a basketball star.

Signed as an amateur free-agent before the 1963 season, Coombs made his major league debut later that year. On September 27, 1963, against the New York Mets, Coombs pitched one third of an inning, allowing three hits and one earned run.

In seven games in 1964, Coombs struck out 14 batters in 18 innings, posting a 5.00 ERA. He won the first game of his career that year in the final game he pitched that season, earning a win on October 2 against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Coombs appeared in 26 games in 1965, allowing 54 hits and 25 earned runs in 47 innings for a 4.79 ERA.

In 1966, Coombs appeared in only two games, striking out three in 2​2⁄3 innings. He posted a 3.38 ERA. 1967 was also a short season for him — he appeared in only six games, going 3–0 with a 3.33 ERA.

In 1968. Coombs appeared in 40 games, going 4–3 with a 3.28 ERA. Coombs appeared in only eight games in 1969, posting a 6.75 ERA in eight innings of work. On October 22 of that year, he was purchased by the Padres.

1970 was the only season where Coombs was used almost entirely as a starter. He appeared in 35 games, starting 27 of them. He went 10–14 with a 3.30 ERA and 105 strikeouts in 188​1⁄3 innings of work. His 3.30 ERA was the best on the team among all pitchers with at least five appearances, and second best overall. Steve Arlin posted a 2.84 ERA in two games, beating him out. Coombs' 3.30 ERA was also the ninth best ERA in the league that year.

Coombs played his final season in 1971. In 19 games (six starts), he posted a 1–6 record with a 6.24 ERA. He played his final game on July 23, 1971.

Overall, Coombs played nine seasons in the majors. Of the 144 games he pitched in, he started 42 of them, completing five of his starts, shutting out one game and saving two games. He posted a 19–27 record in 393 innings of work, allowing 433 hits, 209 runs, 178 earned runs and 26 home runs. He walked 162 batters and struck out 249. His ERA was 4.08. He was a poor batter, collecting 14 hits in 100 at-bats for a .140 batting average. He walked five times and struck out 55 times. After leaving professional baseball, Coombs continued in baseball by passing on his deft knowledge at the high school level. He was a varsity baseball coach along with Head Coach John Magee for the Charles H. Milby Buffaloes in Houston, TX. He continued coaching in the 80s at G.C. Scarborough High School also located in Houston.

Ohio State Buckeyes baseball

The Ohio State Buckeyes baseball team is the college baseball team of The Ohio State University. The program, founded in 1881, was the first athletic team in Ohio State history. Bill Davis Stadium in Columbus, Ohio has been the home field of the program since 1997. The team won a National Title in 1966, and also 14 Big Ten Titles throughout the team's history. It is currently coached by Greg Beals. Ohio State has produced many professional baseball players, such as major leaguers Steve Arlin, Frank Howard, Nick Swisher, Barry Bonnell, Dave Burba, and Fred Taylor.

San Diego Padres award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the San Diego Padres professional baseball team.

Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

Languages

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