State police

State police or provincial police are a type of sub-national territorial police force found in nations organized as federations, typically in North America, South Asia, and Oceania. These forces typically have jurisdiction over the relevant sub-national jurisdiction, and may cooperate in law enforcement activities with municipal or national police where either exist.

SEK-Schnellboot (Schlauchboot) (10585073613)
SEK members of the State Police of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany during an exercise

Argentina

In Argentina, as a federal country, each province has its own independent police force and its responsible of its funding, training and equipment. State police agencies are responsible of all the territory of a determinate state. There is almost no municipal/local law enforcement in Argentina, and if there is, is limited to traffic duties.

Australia

Each state of Australia has its own state police force. Municipalities do not have police forces and it is left to the state forces to police all geographic areas within their respective states. Australia does have a national police force, the Australian Federal Police, whose role is to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth, both criminal law and civil law, as well as to protect the interests of the Commonwealth, both domestically and internationally. The AFP does, however, provide 'state' policing for the Australian Capital Territory, Jervis Bay Territory, and Australia's other external territories such as Norfolk Island, Christmas Island and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands.[1] Prior to the Federation of Australia, each Colony within Australia had numerous police forces, but these were largely amalgamated well before Federation.

Brazil

Each state in Brazil has two state police forces:

Civil Police — the State criminal investigative police.
Military Police — they are uniformed gendarmerie forces fulfilling roles as State police. They are a reserve branch of the Brazilian armed forces[2] but do not perform regular Military Police duties as they are performed by service police such as the Army Police, etc.

Canada

OPP cruiser
An Ontario Provincial Police cruiser

Three provinces of Canada have a dedicated provincial police force, with jurisdiction over some or all of the province:

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) provides provincial-level policing in the remaining land area of Newfoundland and Labrador, as well as the remaining 7 provinces and 3 territories of Canada. The RCMP began being contracted to provide provincial policing in the late 1920s as provincial police forces were disbanded and their duties inherited by provincial divisions of the RCMP. The last provincial police force to be disbanded, the British Columbia Provincial Police, existed from the mid-19th century until it was incorporated into RCMP "E" Division on August 15, 1950.

Some provincial law enforcement duties in Alberta, such as highway patrols, are conducted by the Alberta Sheriffs Branch but it is not a full police service.

Germany

The Landespolizei (or LaPo) is a term used in the Federal Republic of Germany to denote the law enforcement services that perform law enforcement duties in the States of Germany. The German federal constitution leaves the majority of law enforcement responsibilities to the 16 states of the country.

There also are several auxiliary state police forces.

India

Each state and territory has a state police force and its own distinct State Police Service, headed by the Commissioner of Police (State) or Director General of Police (DGP) who is an Indian Police Service officer. The IPS is not a law enforcement agency in its own right; rather it is the body to which all senior police officers of all states belong regardless of the agency for whom they work. The state police is responsible for maintaining law and order in townships of the state and the rural areas.

In addition to the state police, major cities have their own police force called Metropolitan Police which is quite similar to other normal police forces except their different rank designations; e.g., DGP is called as Commissioner of Police (State) in a state with Metropolitan Police.

  1. Andaman and Nicobar Police
  2. Andhra Pradesh Police
  3. Arunachal Pradesh Police
  4. Assam Police
  5. Bihar Police
  6. Chandigarh Police
  7. Chhattisgarh Police
  8. Dadra and Nagar Haveli Police
  9. Daman and Diu Police
  10. Goa Police
  11. Gujarat Police
  12. Haryana Police
  13. Himachal Pradesh Police
  14. Jammu and Kashmir Police
  15. Jharkhand Police
  16. Karnataka Police
  17. Kerala Police
  18. Lakshadweep Police
  19. Madhya Pradesh Police
  20. Maharashtra Police
  21. Manipur Police
  22. Meghalaya Police
  23. Mizoram Police
  24. Nagaland Police
  25. Odisha Police
  26. Pondicherry Police
  27. Punjab Police
  28. Rajasthan Police
  29. Sikkim Police
  30. Tamil Nadu Police
  31. Telangana Police
  32. Tripura Police
  33. Uttar Pradesh Police
  34. Uttarakhand Police
  35. West Bengal Police

Indonesia

Each of the provinces of Indonesia have their own "Regional Police" (Indonesian: Kepolisian Daerah), which under the guidance of the central Indonesian National Police, literally named "Republic of Indonesia State Police". Until 1984, the Regional Polices were called in military-style "Police Regional Command" (Indonesian: Komando Daerah Kepolisian).

Sumatra
Java
Bali and Nusa Tenggara
Kalimantan
Sulawesi
Maluku and North Maluku
Papua

Mexico

Each of the 31 states of Mexico maintains a separate law enforcement agency or Policía Estatal. Each of these state forces is tasked with the protection of their citizens, keeping local order and combating insecurity and drug trafficking. Certain states including Veracruz and Nuevo León have a new model of police force designated as Civilian Forces (Fuerza Civil).

Dodge Charger 2014 SSP Yucatán
A Dodge Charger of the state police of Yucatán in a parade.

Spain

In Spain the state police are two primary police agencies:

  • the Civil Guard in all the state and territorial sea, competent of the traffic laws, crimes, environment, weapons, explosives, borders and coast, besides rescue in mountain and sea.
  • National Police Corps competent in crimes, documentation, immigration and gambling in capitals and cities of more than 50,000 inhabitants.

Also in Spain apart from these two state security bodies also exist;

United States

North Carolina State Trooper on I-85
A North Carolina state trooper's car on I-85 in 2008.

In the United States, state police (also called state troopers or highway patrol) are a police body unique to each U.S. state, having statewide authority to conduct law enforcement activities and criminal investigations. In general, they perform functions outside the jurisdiction of the county sheriff (Vermont being a notable exception), such as enforcing traffic laws on state highways and interstate expressways, overseeing the security of the state capitol complex, protecting the governor, training new officers for local police forces too small to operate an academy, providing technological and scientific services, supporting local police and helping to coordinate multi-jurisdictional task force activity in serious or complicated cases in those states that grant full police powers statewide. A general trend has been to bring all of these agencies under a state Department of Public Safety. Additionally, they may serve under different state departments such as the Highway Patrol under the state Department of Transportation and the Marine patrol under the state Department of Natural Resources.

Twenty-two U.S. states use the term "State Police," fifteen use the term "Highway Patrol," seven use the term "State Patrol," and three use the term "State Highway Patrol." In Alaska, the agency is called the "Division of Alaska State Troopers," while in Arizona and Texas, it is the "Department of Public Safety." Hawaii does not have a statewide police agency.

References

  1. ^ "AFP across the world". afp.gov.au. 26 February 2016.
  2. ^ "Brazilian Laws - the Federal Constitution - Defense of State and Democratic Institutions". v-brazil.com.

External links

Connecticut State Police

The Connecticut State Police (CSP) is a division of the Connecticut Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection responsible for traffic regulation and law enforcement across the state of Connecticut, especially in areas not served by (or served by smaller) local police departments. The CSP currently has approximately 1,031 troopers, and is headquartered in Middletown, Connecticut. It is responsible for protecting the Governor of Connecticut, Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut, and their families.

Gestapo

The Geheime Staatspolizei (Secret State Police), abbreviated Gestapo (German pronunciation: [ɡeˈstaːpo, ɡəˈʃtaːpo] (listen)), was the official secret police of Nazi Germany and German-occupied Europe.

The force was created by Hermann Göring in 1933 by combining the various security police agencies of Prussia into one organisation. Beginning on 20 April 1934, it passed to the administration of Schutzstaffel (SS) national leader Heinrich Himmler, who in 1936 was appointed Chief of German Police (Chef der Deutschen Polizei) by Hitler. The Gestapo at this time became a national rather than a Prussian state agency as a suboffice of the Sicherheitspolizei (SiPo; Security Police). Then, from 27 September 1939 forward, it was administered by the Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA; Reich Main Security Office). It became known as Amt (Dept) 4 of the RSHA and was considered a sister organisation to the Sicherheitsdienst (SD; Security Service). During World War II, the Gestapo played a key role in the Nazi plan to exterminate the Jews of Europe.

Hawaii Department of Public Safety

The Hawaii Department of Public Safety is a department within the executive branch of the government of the U.S. state of Hawaii. It is headquartered in Room 400 in the 919 Ala Moana Boulevard building in Honolulu, Hawaii. The Department of Public Safety is made up of three divisions.

Highway patrol

A highway patrol is either a police unit created primarily for the purpose of overseeing and enforcing traffic safety compliance on roads and highways, or a detail within an existing local or regional police agency that is primarily concerned with such duties. They are also referred to in many countries as traffic police, although in other countries this term is more commonly used to refer to foot officers on point duty who control traffic at junctions.

Karnataka Police

The Karnataka State Police Department is the law enforcement agency for the Indian state of Karnataka. The department is headed by the Director General of Police.

Law enforcement in India

Law enforcement in India is performed by numerous law enforcement agencies. Like many federal nations, the nature of the Constitution of India mandates law and order as a responsibility of the state. Therefore the bulk of the policing lies with the respective states and territories of India.

At the federal level, the many agencies are part of the Ministry of Home Affairs, and support the states in their duties. Larger cities also operate police commissionerates, under respective state police. All senior police officers in the state police forces, as well as those in the federal agencies, are members of the Indian Police Service (IPS).

Louisiana State Police

The Louisiana State Police is the state police department of Louisiana, which has jurisdiction anywhere in the state, headquartered in Baton Rouge. It falls under the authority of the Louisiana Department of Public Safety & Corrections. It is officially known in that organization as the Office of State Police. The badge worn by its troopers is very distinctive in that it is shaped like the state of Louisiana. The Louisiana State Police is a premier law enforcement agency in Louisiana and was accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) from 2003 to 2008. The agency voluntarily ceased its association with CALEA in 2008.

Maharashtra Police

Maharashtra Police is the law enforcement agency responsible for the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is headed by Director General of Police and headquartered in Mumbai, Maharashtra.

It has one of the largest police departments in the country, having about 35 district police units in the state. The Maharashtra Police Department has a strength of nearly 1.95 lakh. It also has 1.5 lakh women in its force.

Maryland State Police

The Maryland State Police (MDSP), officially the Department of Maryland State Police (MSP), is the official state police force of the U.S. state of Maryland. The Maryland State Police is headquartered at 1201 Reisterstown Road in the Pikesville CDP in unincorporated Baltimore County.

Massachusetts State Police

The Massachusetts State Police (MSP) is an agency of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Executive Office of Public Safety and Security responsible for criminal law enforcement and traffic vehicle regulation across the state. At present, it has approximately 2,300 officers, 1500 of them being uniformed troopers, and 400 civilian support staff—making it the largest law enforcement agency in New England. The MSP was headed by Colonel Richard McKeon, until his retirement on November 11, 2017.It investigates instances of wrongful deaths in most Massachusetts cities.

Michigan State Police

The Michigan State Police (MSP), originally Michigan Troopers Permanent Force, is the state police agency for the state of Michigan. The MSP is a full-service law enforcement agency with its sworn members having full police powers statewide.

The department was founded in 1917 as a wartime constabulary and eventually evolved into the modern agency that it is today. The department's entry-level members are called "Troopers". Its headquarters is in Dimondale, Mich.

New Jersey State Police

The New Jersey State Police (NJSP), is the official state police force of the U.S. state of New Jersey. It is a general-powers police agency with statewide jurisdiction, designated by Troop Sectors.

New York State Police

The New York State Police (NYSP), is the official state police force of the U.S. state of New York and employs over 5,000 sworn

state troopers. It is part of the New York State Executive Department, ref. Executive Law § 31. "There shall be in the executive department the following divisions: [...] The Division of State Police."

Pennsylvania State Police

The Pennsylvania State Police (PSP), is the state police agency of Pennsylvania, responsible for statewide law enforcement. The Pennsylvania State Police was founded in 1905 by order of Governor Samuel Pennypacker, by signing Senate Bill 278 on May 2, 1905. The bill was signed in response to the Great Anthracite Strike of 1902. Leading up to the Anthracite Strike, private police forces (the coal and iron police) were used by mine and mill owners to stop worker strikes. The inability or refusal of local police or sheriffs' offices to enforce the law, directly influenced the signing of Bill 278. The Anthracite Strike lasted from May 15 to October 23, 1902 and ended with the help of Theodore Roosevelt, the sitting president at the time. Roosevelt was outspoken in his admiration for the Pennsylvania State Police, having this to say, "The Pennsylvania State Police are a spirited force not to be bought, bent, confused, alarmed or exhausted", and "I feel so strongly about them that the mere fact a man is honorably discharged from this force would make me at once, and without hesitation, employ him for any purpose needing courage, prowess, good judgment, loyalty, and entire trustworthiness."PSP enlisted members are referred to as "Troopers". Up until 1963, married men were not allowed to apply to the state police, and active troopers had to seek permission from their superior officer to get married. As of 2018, the state police has approximately 4,255 state troopers, 5% of them being women, and more than 1,850 civilian support staff.The current State Police commissioner is Lt. Colonel Robert Evanchick. Lt. Colonel Evanchick replaced Colonel Tyree Blocker, who retired from service in 2018. Colonel Blocker replaced Marcus Brown, who failed to secure confirmation by the state's legislature. After resigning, former Colonel Brown was named to Governor Wolf's state office of Homeland Security as the new director.

Police ranks and insignia of India

Gazetted officers include all the Indian Police Service officers which are Class I officers of the cadre and all State Police Services officers of and above the rank of inspector of police and State Police forces respectively. All are arranged in a hierarchical order.

Polizia di Stato

The Polizia di Stato (State Police or P.S.) is one of the national police forces of Italy.

Alongside with Carabinieri, it is the main police force for providing police duties and, with its child agencies it is also responsible for highway patrol (autostrade), railways (ferrovie), airports (aeroporti), customs (together with the Guardia di Finanza) as well as certain waterways, and assisting the local police forces.

It was a military force until 1981 when the Italian State Law 121 was passed. This converted the State Police to a civil force, which is in contrast to the other main police forces of Italy: the Arma dei Carabinieri, which is a military police (gendarmerie) force and the Guardia di Finanza, the Italian customs and border protection police that also falls in the military corps category.The Polizia di Stato is the principal Italian police force for the maintenance of public security and as such it is run directly from the Dipartimento della Pubblica Sicurezza (Department of Public Security), and the keeping of public order (ordine pubblico).

State police (United States)

In the United States, state police are a police body unique to each U.S. state, having statewide authority to conduct law enforcement activities and criminal investigations. In general, they perform functions outside the jurisdiction of the county sheriff (Vermont being a notable exception), such as enforcing traffic laws on state highways and interstate expressways, overseeing the security of the state capitol complex, protecting the governor, training new officers for local police forces too small to operate an academy and providing technological and scientific services. They support local police and help to coordinate multi-jurisdictional task force activity in serious or complicated cases in those states that grant full police powers statewide.

A general trend has been to bring all of these agencies under a state-level Department of Public Safety. Additionally, they may serve under different state departments, such as the Highway Patrol under the state Department of Transportation and the Marine patrol under the Department of Natural Resources. Twenty-three U.S. states use the term "State Police." Forty-nine states have a State Police agency or its equivalent, with Hawaii being the only state without a so-designated statewide police agency.

Telangana State Police

The Telangana State Police Department, is the law enforcement agency for the state of Telangana in India. The Telangana State Police has jurisdiction concurrent with the 31 revenue districts of the State which is headed by an officer designated as the Director General of Police who reports to the State Government through the Home (Police) Department. The police force was created from the basis of the Andhra Pradesh, when the Telangana state was formed.

Virginia State Police

The Virginia State Police, officially the Virginia Department of State Police, is a U.S. state law enforcement agency, conceived in 1919 and established in 1932, that acts as the state police force for the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. The agency originated out of the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles as an inspector and enforcer of highway laws. It is currently one of fourteen agencies within the Cabinet Secretariat of Public Safety, under the leadership of Secretary Brian Moran. On January 18, 2018, Gary T. Settle was sworn in as Superintendent of the Virginia State Police. Colonel Settle replaces retiring Colonel W. Steven Flaherty, who had served since 2003.

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