Stanley Robison

Martin Stanford "Stanley" Robison (March 30, 1859 – March 24, 1911) was an American owner and manager in Major League Baseball. Robison was the owner of the St. Louis Cardinals from 1899 to 1911, along with his brother Frank. He was also part-owner of the Cleveland Spiders for most of their existence, from 1887 to 1899. During the 1905 season, he took over as manager of the Cardinals for the final 50 games. He finished with a managerial record of 19 wins, 31 losses in 50 games. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he died in Cleveland, Ohio, where he is interred at Lake View Cemetery.[1]

Stanley Robison
Stanley Robison
Owner/Manager
Born: March 30, 1854
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Died: March 24, 1911 (aged 56)
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Batted: Unknown Threw: Unknown
MLB debut
August 10, 1905, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
October 8, 1905, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Games managed50
Win Loss-Record19–31
Winning %.380
Teams
  • St. Louis Cardinals (1905)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Stan Robison's career statistics". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet, Inc. Retrieved 2009-08-05.

External links

1898 Cleveland Spiders season

The 1898 Cleveland Spiders finished with an 81–68 record, good for fifth place in the National League. After the season, the team's owners, Frank and Stanley Robison, additionally purchased the St. Louis Browns from Chris von der Ahe. Claiming disappointment in attendance in Cleveland, they transferred many of the Spiders' better players to the St. Louis team, which they renamed the Perfectos. The Spiders would fold after the 1899 season

1899 Cleveland Spiders season

The 1899 Cleveland Spiders season was the team's 13th and final season in Major League Baseball, and their 11th season in the National League.

In 1899, the owners of the Spiders, the Robison brothers, Frank and Stanley, bought the St. Louis Browns baseball club from Chris von der Ahe, renaming it the Perfectos. However, they continued to retain ownership of the Cleveland club, an obvious conflict of interest that was later outlawed.

Stanley Robison publicly announced his intention to run the Spiders "as a sideshow", and fans apparently took him at his word. After the first 16 home games, Cleveland's total attendance was 3,179 for a trifling average of 199 people per game. As a result, other NL teams refused to travel to Cleveland's League Park, as their cut of the ticket revenue would not come close to covering their travel and hotel expenses. The Spiders only played 26 more home games for the rest of the season, including only eight after July 1. In so doing, they set a number of negative records, including one, 101 road losses, that is unbreakable under MLB's current schedule. Sportswriters of the day began referring to the team as the "Exiles" and "Wanderers." Their final record for the season was 20–134 for a win ratio of .130, still the worst in Major League Baseball history.

1900 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1900 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 19th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 9th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 65–75 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1901 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1901 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 20th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 10th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 76–64 during the season and finished 4th in the National League. It was the first time the Cardinals had finished in the top half of the standings since joining the National League.

1902 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1902 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 21st season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 11th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 56–78 during the season and finished 6th in the National League.

1903 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1903 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 22nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 12th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 43–94 during the season and finished 8th in the National League.

1904 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1904 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 23rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 13th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 75–79 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1905 Major League Baseball season

The 1905 Major League Baseball season, had the second modern World Series. The New York Giants defeated the Philadelphia Athletics to win the World Series.

1905 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1905 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 24th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 14th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 58–96 during the season and finished sixth in the National League.

1906 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1906 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 25th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 15th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–98 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1907 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1907 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 26th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 16th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–101 during the season and finished eighth and last in the eight-team National League.

1908 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1908 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 27th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 17th season in the National League. The Cardinals had a 49–105 win-loss record during the season and finished 8th (last) in the National League. The season's attendance of 185,377, an average of less than 2,500 a game, which remains the lowest peacetime attendance level since 1901. The Cardinals set a Major League record which stills stands for the fewest base on balls by a team in a season, with 282. Additionally, they hold the MLB record for fewest runs scored in a season with 372, only 2.42 runs per contest.

1909 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1909 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 28th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 18th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 54–98 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1910 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1910 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 29th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 19th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 63–90 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

Frank Robison

Frank DeHass Robison (1852 – September 25, 1908) was an American businessman, best known as a baseball executive. He was the organizer of the Cleveland Spiders franchise, and owned or part-owned the club throughout its existence, from its founding in 1887 as the Cleveland Blues until 1899. Along with his brother, Stanley Robison, he was also co-owner of the St. Louis Perfectos/Cardinals baseball team of the National League from 1899 through 1911.After briefly attending Delaware University, Robison went into business with his father-in-law, Charles Hathaway, operating streetcars in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1887, he used funds from this business to start up a baseball team, the Cleveland Blues (called the Forest Citys in some sources). He continued to operate in both areas for the next two decades, including financing the construction of League Park in 1889, and the formation of the Cleveland City Railway Company in 1893.In 1899, the Robison brothers were responsible for the worst Major League Baseball team in history, the 1899 Cleveland Spiders. Before the season, the Robisons purchased the bankrupt St. Louis Browns from Chris von der Ahe and renamed them the Perfectos. During the single season in which they owned both the Spiders and Perfectos, the brothers transferred the best players of both franchises to St. Louis, leaving the Spiders with a team that finished with a record of 20-134, the worst full-season record ever for a major league baseball team. Following this debacle (and a similar one involving the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas), the practice of allowing the same owners to run multiple teams was outlawed.Following Robison's death in 1908, Stanley Robison became sole owner of the Cardinals until his death at his home in Bratenahl, Ohio in 1911, when the franchise was bequeathed to Frank's daughter (and Stanley's niece) Helene Hathaway Britton.

Harry Diddlebock

Henry Harrison Diddlebock (June 27, 1854 – February 5, 1900) was a sportswriter and Major League Baseball manager. Formerly a head sportswriter for two Philadelphia newspapers, Diddlebock managed 17 games with the St. Louis Browns in the 1896 season. He had a 7–10 record (a .412 winning percentage).

Helene Hathaway Britton

Helene Hathaway Robison Britton (January 30, 1879 – January 8, 1950) was the owner of the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team of the National League from 1911 through 1916. She inherited the franchise upon the death of her father, Frank, and uncle, Stanley Robison. Britton was the first woman to own a Major League Baseball franchise.

Jack Clements

John J. "Jack" Clements (July 24, 1864 – May 23, 1941) was an American professional baseball player. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for 17 seasons. Despite being left-handed, Clements caught 1,073 games, almost four times as many as any other left-handed player in major league history and was the last left-hander to catch on a regular basis. He is credited with being the first catcher to wear a chest protector.

Jimmy Burke (baseball)

James Timothy Burke (October 12, 1874 – March 26, 1942) was a Major League Baseball third baseman, coach, and manager. He played for the Cleveland Spiders, St. Louis Perfectos, Milwaukee Brewers, Chicago White Stockings, Pittsburgh Pirates, and St. Louis Cardinals.

Burke was the regular third baseman for the Cardinals from 1903 to 1905. He was named player-manager in the middle of the 1905, season but was replaced by Stanley Robison after amassing a record of 34–56.

From 1914 through 1917, Burke was a coach for the Detroit Tigers. He then served as manager for the St. Louis Browns from 1918 through 1920. In 1921, he became a coach for the Boston Red Sox, a position he held for three seasons. Burke later was a coach for the Chicago Cubs from 1926 through 1930, and was last a coach with the New York Yankees from 1931 through 1933.

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