Stan Spencer

Stanley Roger Spencer (born August 7, 1969) is a former major league pitcher for the San Diego Padres.

Spencer was drafted by the Boston Red Sox in 1987 in the 26th round, 681st overall, and then again by the Montreal Expos with the 35th pick in the first round of the 1990 draft. After several years in the minors he made his major league debut on August 27, 1998. He played a total of 3 seasons going 3-9 with an earned run average of 5.54 and 107 strikeouts.

Graduate of Columbia River High School, Vancouver, Washington (1987).

Stan Spencer
Pitcher
Born: August 7, 1969 (age 50)
Vancouver, Washington
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 27, 1998, for the San Diego Padres
Last MLB appearance
June 19, 2000, for the San Diego Padres
MLB statistics
Win–loss record3–9
Earned run average5.54
Strikeouts107
Teams

External links

1969 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1969 throughout the world.

1987 Major League Baseball draft

The Major League Baseball Draft is the process by which Major League Baseball (MLB) teams select athletes to play for their organization. High school seniors, college juniors and seniors, and anyone who had never played under a professional contract were considered eligible for the draft. The 1987 MLB Draft took place as a conference call to the Commissioner of Baseball's office in New York from June 2–4. As opposed to the National Football League Draft which appeared on ESPN, no network aired the MLB Draft.

The American League (AL) and the National League (NL) alternated picks throughout the first round; because an NL team drafted first in the 1986 MLB Draft, an AL team had the first selection in 1987. Having finished 67–95 in 1986, the Seattle Mariners had the worst record in the AL and thus obtained the first overall selection. The second selection went to the Pittsburgh Pirates, who had the worst record in the NL.

With the first overall pick, the Mariners drafted Ken Griffey, Jr. from Moeller High School. Griffey, Jr. became a 13-time All-Star and helped Seattle make its first postseason appearance in franchise history. Mark Merchant, the second overall pick, however, never played in a major league game. Two years after he was drafted, the Pirates traded Merchant to Seattle. Chicago White Sox' first overall selection Jack McDowell won the 1993 Cy Young Award as Chicago made a League Championship Series appearance that year. The total number of athletes drafted, 1,263, broke a record for the most players ever chosen in a draft. In total, 27 All-Stars were selected in 1987, although not all signed a professional contract. As of 2016, only two players from the draft has been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame– Craig Biggio and Griffey, Jr.

1988 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1988 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1988 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty-second year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-second tournament's champion was Stanford coached by Mark Marquess. The Most Outstanding Player was Lee Plemel of Stanford.

1988 Stanford Cardinal baseball team

The 1988 Stanford Cardinal baseball team represented Stanford University in the 1988 NCAA Division I baseball season. The team was coached by Mark Marquess in his 12th season at Stanford.

The Cardinal won the College World Series, defeating the Arizona State Sun Devils in the championship game.

1990 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1990 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1990 Major League Baseball draft

The 1990 Major League Baseball (MLB) Draft was held in June 1990. The draft placed amateur baseball players onto major league teams. 1,487 players were distributed to 26 teams. The draft consisted of first round selections, supplemental first round selections, compensation picks, and many more rounds, in fact, it went a record 101 rounds with 40 first round selections. With a league-worst record of 63 wins and 97 losses in the 1989 MLB Season, the Atlanta Braves selected shortstop, Chipper Jones out of the Bolles School with the first pick of the draft. 9 NBA and NFL players were drafted in 1990. 7 of the first 10 picks were selected directly out of high school.

1990 Montreal Expos season

The 1990 Montreal Expos season was the 22nd season in franchise history.

1990 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1990 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1990 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty fourth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-fourth tournament's champion was Georgia, coached by Steve Webber. The Most Outstanding Player was Mike Rebhan of Georgia.

1998 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1998 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 116th season in the history of the franchise.

1998 San Diego Padres season

The 1998 San Diego Padres season was the 30th season in franchise history. The Padres won the National League championship and advanced to the World Series for the second time in franchise history.

San Diego featured five All-Stars: pitchers Andy Ashby, Kevin Brown, and Trevor Hoffman, and outfielders Tony Gwynn and Greg Vaughn. Brown and Hoffman were two of the premier pitchers in baseball for 1998. Brown led the staff in wins, earned run average, and strikeouts, and he also finished in the league's top five in each category. Hoffman saved 53 games and was voted the NL Rolaids Relief Man Award for best closer in the league. Ashby was the team's number two starter with 17 wins.

The Padres offense was led by Vaughn, who had the greatest season of his career in 1998. He ended up winning both the Comeback Player of the Year Award and the Silver Slugger Award. And in a season headlined by sluggers Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, Vaughn was matching them in home runs before finishing with 50 (compared to 70 for McGwire and 66 for Sosa). Former MVP Ken Caminiti was second on the team in home runs and runs batted in. Gwynn had a .321 batting average.

In the regular season, San Diego won the NL Western Division. Their 98-64 record was third-best in the league, behind only the Atlanta Braves and Houston Astros, who San Diego then went a combined 7-3 again in winning the NL pennant. But the Padres faced the 1998 New York Yankees in the World Series, and were swept, four games to none.

1999 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1999 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 117th season in the history of the franchise.

1999 San Diego Padres season

The 1999 San Diego Padres season was the 31st season in franchise history. They finished fourth in the National League West. They had lost several key players after their 1998 pennant-winning season, most notably pitching ace Kevin Brown.

2000 San Diego Padres season

The 2000 San Diego Padres season was the 32nd season in franchise history.

Columbia River High School

Columbia River High School is a public high school in Vancouver, Washington, United States. It is part of the Vancouver School District (VSD). The school was opened to students in 1962. Columbia River has over 1,200 students. Columbia River is a magnet school in the VSD for the International Baccalaureate Program.

List of Major League Baseball players (Sp–Sz)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active.

List of Washington Nationals first-round draft picks

The Washington Nationals are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Washington, D.C. Prior to 2005, they were known as the Montreal Expos and based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The Nationals play in the National League East division. Since the institution of MLB's Rule 4 Draft, the Expos/Nationals have selected 71 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks. The First-Year Player Draft is unrelated to the 1968 expansion draft in which the Expos initially filled their roster.

Of the 71 players picked in the first round by Montreal or Washington, 36 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 25 of them were right-handed, while 11 were left-handed. Thirteen outfielders, ten shortstops, five third basemen, four catchers, and three first basemen were also taken. The team has never drafted a player at second base. In all, 40 of the players were drafted from high school, 27 from four-year colleges, and four from junior colleges. Eleven of the players came from high schools, universities, or junior colleges in the state of California, and Florida follows with 10 players. They have also drafted two players from Puerto Rico: Josue Estrada (1993) and Hiram Bocachica (1994).None of the Expos' or Nationals' first-round picks have won a World Series championship with the franchise (which has never won a World Series championship), and no pick has been elected to the Hall of Fame. One first-round pick, Bryce Harper (2010), has been named Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player in his career, earning National League rookie honors in 2012 and National League MVP honors in 2015, both with the Nationals. Harper is the second of the Nationals' two overall #1 selections; the first was Stephen Strasburg in 2009. Condredge Holloway (1971) was drafted as a shortstop, but ended up becoming a quarterback in the Canadian Football League, and was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1999.The Expos/Nationals have made 19 selections in the supplemental round of the draft and six compensatory picks since their entry into the league in 1969. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Expos/Nationals have failed to sign four of their first-round picks: Condredge Holloway (1971), Charles Johnson (1989), John Patterson (1996), and Aaron Crow (2008). The Expos received no compensation for failing to sign Holloway, but received the 40th pick in 1990, the 52nd pick in 1997, and the 10th pick in 2009 for failing to sign Johnson, Patterson, and Crow, respectively.

List of people with surname Spencer

This is a list of people with surname Spencer.

San Diego Padres all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the San Diego Padres National League franchise (1969–present).

Players in Bold are members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Players in Italics have had their numbers retired by the team.

Stanford Cardinal

The Stanford Cardinal are the athletic teams that represent Stanford University. Stanford's program has won 123 NCAA team championships, as well as 25 consecutive NACDA Directors' Cups, awarded annually to the most successful overall college sports program in the nation. As of February 15, 2019, Stanford-affiliated athletes have won 270 Olympic medals. Stanford's teams compete at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I (Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) for college football) level as a member of the Pac-12 Conference, along with other schools from the western third of the United States.

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