Stan Bahnsen

Stanley Raymond Bahnsen (born December 15, 1944) is an American former professional baseball pitcher, who played Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics, Montreal Expos, California Angels, and Philadelphia Phillies. Nicknamed the "Bahnsen Burner," he once made 118 starts over a three-year stretch while playing with the Chicago White Sox in the mid-1970s.

Stan Bahnsen
Stan Bahnsen 1970
Bahnsen in 1970
Pitcher
Born: December 15, 1944 (age 74)
Council Bluffs, Iowa
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 9, 1966, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1982, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record146–149
Earned run average3.60
Strikeouts1,359
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

New York Yankees

Bahnsen was drafted out of the University of Nebraska by the New York Yankees in the fourth round of the 1965 Major League Baseball Draft. After two seasons in the minor leagues, in which he went 12-9 with a 2.87 earned run average, he received his first call up to the majors in September 1966. In four games with the Yanks, he was 1-1 with a save and 3.52 ERA. He earned an invitation to Spring training camp in 1967, but was assigned to the triple A Syracuse Chiefs.[1]

After arriving at camp late due to an army commitment, Bahnsen was given a second chance at a roster spot in 1968. He made the club, and proceeded to go 17-12 with a team best 2.05 ERA and struck out a career-high 162 batters to be named the American League Rookie of the Year. His finest performance of the season and only shutout came on August 1 against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park. He struck out twelve, while allowing only three hits and walking no one.[2]

Bahnsen spent three more seasons with the Yankees, never matching his rookie success. Perhaps the most famous moment of his Yankee career from that point forward was a brawl with the Cleveland Indians Vada Pinson in which he was knocked down with one punch.[3] Following the 1971 season, he was traded to the Chicago White Sox for infielder Rich McKinney.

Chicago White Sox

White Sox manager Chuck Tanner employed a unique strategy with his starting rotation for the 1972 season. Recognizing the talent he had at the top of his rotation, he started Wilbur Wood, Bahnsen or Tom Bradley as much as possible, leaving only 24 starts for the rest of the staff. The strategy worked, as the White Sox finished over .500 for the first time since 1967, and in second place in the American League West. For his part, Bahnsen made 41 starts, and went 21-16 with a 3.60 ERA in his first season with the South Siders.

The next season, Bahnsen made 42 starts, however his record dipped to 18-21 as the White Sox finished the season in fifth place. In one of those 18 wins, a 4-0 shutout over the Cleveland Indians on August 21 at Municipal Stadium, Bahnsen had a no-hitter broken up with two out in the ninth on a single by former teammate Walt Williams.[4][5]

Bahnsen made another 35 starts for the White Sox in 1974. Along the way, he started another bench-clearing brawl; this time with the Kansas City Royals' John Mayberry.[6] Coincidentally, Pinson was also a member of the Royals, and in the starting line-up that day. He had already made twelve starts in 1975 when he was dealt with Skip Pitlock to the Oakland Athletics for Chet Lemon and Dave Hamilton on June 15. In a little over three seasons in Chicago, Bahnsen made 130 starts, and was 55-58.

Oakland Athletics

After going 6-7 with a 3.24 ERA for the A's in 1975, he was reunited with former White Sox manager Chuck Tanner for 1976. Tanner employed a similar strategy with the A's to that which he had with the White Sox, starting Vida Blue and Mike Torrez as much as possible. Bahnsen only made fourteen starts, seeing most of his work in relief. He went 8-7 with a 3.34 ERA for the season. Early into the 1977 season, he was traded to the Montreal Expos for first baseman Mike Jorgensen.

Montreal Expos

After making 22 starts for the Expos in 1977, Bahnsen became a full-time reliever in 1978, making just one emergency start. He became a valuable member of the bullpen, collecting seventeen saves over the next four seasons with the Expos, and leading the team in innings pitched out of the bullpen in 1979 (94.1).

Career twilight

The Expos released Bahnsen at the end of Spring training, just as the 1982 season was set to begin. He joined the California Angels shortly afterwards, but was released after seven games with a 4.66 ERA on May 14.

Shortly afterwards, he signed a minor league deal with the Philadelphia Phillies, and went 4-3 with a 4.89 ERA for the triple A Oklahoma City 89ers. He appeared briefly with the Phillies that September, giving up just two earned runs in 13.1 innings pitched. After going 0-3 with a 9.59 ERA for the Pacific Coast League's Portland Beavers in 1983, he retired.

For his career, Bahnsen posted a 146-149 record. Other statistics: 574 games, 327 games started, 73 complete games, 16 shutouts, 90 games finished, 20 saves, 2,529 innings pitched, 2,440 hits allowed, 1,127 runs allowed, 1,013 earned runs allowed, 223 home runs allowed, 924 walks (59 intentional), 1,359 strikeouts, 34 hit batsmen, 89 wild pitches, 10,701 batters faced, three balks and a 3.60 ERA. Bahnsen has a career .117 batting average, and has driven in nineteen runs. His only career home run came on August 19, 1979 against the Atlanta Braves' Tony Brizzolara.[7]

In 1992 Bahnsen played for one season for the Dutch Major League Team Haarlem Nicols, two years before the team declared bankruptcy. [8]

Career after baseball

Bahnsen works with the promotions department of MSC Cruises seeking and securing retired major league players to participate in activities on cruise ships such as autograph and story-telling sessions. He also works with 640 AM, a south Florida radio station that broadcasts Yankee games.

References

  1. ^ "Yanks' Stan Bahnsen Rookie of Year". The Tuscaloosa News. November 20, 1968.
  2. ^ "New York Yankees 1, Boston Red Sox 0". Baseball-Reference.com. August 1, 1968.
  3. ^ "Pinson Lands Haymaker on Bahnsen". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. June 25, 1970.
  4. ^ "Stan's balloon was pierced by Williams". Edmonton Journal. Associated Press. 22 August 1973. p. 77. Retrieved 26 January 2011.
  5. ^ "Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland Indians 0". Baseball-Reference.com. August 21, 1973.
  6. ^ "Royals Win as Fists Fly". The Milwaukee Sentinel. May 24, 1974.
  7. ^ "Montreal Expos 5, Atlanta Braves 1". Baseball-Reference.com. August 19, 1979.
  8. ^ https://dutchbaseballhangout.wordpress.com/2014/11/21/history-of-dutch-baseball-1980-2000/

External links

1966 New York Yankees season

The 1966 New York Yankees season was the 64th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 70–89, finishing 26.5 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Johnny Keane and Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Keane managed his final MLB game in early-May, and died the following January at the age of 55.

The Yankees finished in 10th place, although arguably a "strong" tenth. It was the first time they had finished in last place since 1912, their last year at the Hilltop.

On September 22, paid attendance of 413 was announced at the 65,000-seat Yankee Stadium. WPIX announcer Red Barber asked the TV cameras to pan the empty stands as he commented on the low attendance. Although denied the camera shots on orders from the Yankees' head of media relations, he said, "I don't know what the paid attendance is today, but whatever it is, it is the smallest crowd in the history of Yankee Stadium, and this crowd is the story, not the game." By a horrible stroke of luck, that game was the first for CBS executive Mike Burke as team president. A week later, Barber was invited to breakfast where Burke told him that his contract wouldn't be renewed.

1968 New York Yankees season

The 1968 New York Yankees season was the 66th season for the team in New York, and its 68th season overall. The team finished above .500 for the first time since 1964, with a record of 83–79, finishing 20 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. The 1968 season was notable for being Mickey Mantle's final season before he announced his retirement the following spring. The Yankees batted .214 as a team, the lowest total ever for the live-ball era (as of 2017).

1969 New York Yankees season

The 1969 New York Yankees season was the 67th season for the team in New York, and its 69th season overall. The team finished in fifth-place in the newly established American League East with a record of 80–81, 28½ games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1970 New York Yankees season

The 1970 New York Yankees season was the 68th season for the franchise in New York, and its 70th season overall. The team finished in second place in the American League East with a record of 93–69, 15 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. The 93 wins were the most for the Yankees since 1964. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1971 New York Yankees season

The 1971 New York Yankees season was the 69th season for the franchise in New York, and its 71st season overall. The team finished fourth in the American League East with a record of 82–80, 21 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1972 Chicago White Sox season

The 1972 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 73rd season overall, and 72nd in the American League. They finished with a record 87–67, good enough for second place in the American League West, 5½ games behind the first-place Oakland Athletics.

1973 Chicago White Sox season

The 1973 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 73rd season in the major leagues, and its 74th season overall. They finished with a record 77–85, good enough for fifth place in the American League West, 17 games behind the first-place Oakland Athletics.

1974 Chicago White Sox season

The 1974 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 74th season in the major leagues, and its 75th season overall. They finished with a record 80–80, good enough for fourth place in the American League West, 9 games behind the first-place Oakland Athletics.

1975 Chicago White Sox season

The 1975 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 75th season in Major League Baseball, and its 76th season overall. They finished with a record 75–86, good enough for fifth place in the American League West, 22½ games behind the first-place Oakland Athletics.

1975 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1975 season involved the A's finishing first in the American League West with a record of 98 wins and 64 losses. They went on to play the Boston Red Sox in the 1975 American League Championship Series, losing in three straight games.

1976 Oakland Athletics season

The 1976 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's finishing second in the American League West with a record of 87 wins and 74 losses, 2½ games behind the Kansas City Royals, meaning that the A's failed to make the playoffs for the first time since 1970. This team set and still holds the modern Major League team record for most stolen bases in a season with 341.The Athletics would not eclipse this season's win total until 1988 (when they won 104). Indeed, nearly all of the team's stars (Sal Bando, Rollie Fingers, Gene Tenace, Joe Rudi, Bert Campaneris, Don Baylor, Phil Garner, Billy Williams, Claudell Washington, and an injury-plagued Willie McCovey) would depart during the 1976–77 offseason. This staggering mass exodus contributed led to a 24-win plunge in 1977.

1977 Montreal Expos season

The 1977 Montreal Expos season was the ninth season in the history of the franchise. The team finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 73–87, 26 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies. This was the first year the team played their home games in Olympic Stadium, having left Jarry Park after the 1976 season.

1978 Montreal Expos season

The 1978 Montreal Expos season was the tenth season in franchise history. The team finished fourth in the National League East with a record of 76-86, 14 games behind the first-place Philadelphia Phillies.

1979 Montreal Expos season

The 1979 Montreal Expos season was the 11th in franchise history. The team finished second in the National League East with a record of 95-65, 2 games behind the first-place Pittsburgh Pirates.

1980 Montreal Expos season

The 1980 Montreal Expos season was the 12th season in franchise history.

1988 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1988 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Willie Stargell.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected no one.

Bahnsen

Bahnsen is a German surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Greg Bahnsen (1948–1995), Calvinist philosopher, apologist, and debater

John Bahnsen (born 1934), United States Army general

Julius Bahnsen (1830–1881), German philosopher

Karen Bahnsen (born 1960), American college golf coach and former player

Ken Bahnsen (born 1930), American football player

Stan Bahnsen (born 1944), Major League Baseball pitcher

Uwe Bahnsen (1930–2013), German car designer

Gene Martin

Thomas Eugene Martin (born January 12, 1947 in Americus, Georgia) is a former Major League Baseball left fielder. He was drafted by the Washington Senators in the 3rd round of the 1965 Major League Baseball draft, and he played in nine games for them in 1968.

Martin, 21 years old, made the most of a very brief major league career. He appeared in just nine games, most as a pinch hitter, and hit .364 with two singles, a double, and a home run in just 11 at bats. His home run was hit against 1968 American League Rookie of the Year Stan Bahnsen. It happened on September 8, 1968, at Yankee Stadium.

Martin had much greater success in Japan, where he played for six seasons from 1974 until 1979. He played five seasons for the Chunichi Dragons, then one season for the Yokohama Taiyo Whales. Over the course of his Japanese career, he hit 189 home runs (averaging over 30 per season) while batting .272.

Skip Pitlock

Lee Patrick Thomas Pitlock (born November 6, 1947) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. Noted for his unusual wind-up, he had a "herky-jerky" motion which deceived major league batters, and led to 124 career strikeouts in 192.2 innings pitched.

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