Staff sergeant

Staff sergeant is a rank of non-commissioned officer used in the armed forces of several countries. It is also a police rank in some police services.

History of title

In origin, certain senior sergeants were assigned to administrative, supervisory, or other specialist duties as part of the staff of a British army regiment. As such they held seniority over sergeants who were members of a battalion or company, and were paid correspondingly increased wages. Their seniority was indicated by a crown worn above the three sergeant's stripes on their uniform rank markings.[1][2]

National variations

Australia

In the Australian Army and Cadets, the rank of staff sergeant is being phased out.[3] It was usually held by the company quartermaster sergeant or the holders of other administrative roles. Staff sergeants are always addressed as "Staff Sergeant" or "Staff", never as "Sergeant" as it degrades their rank. "Chief" is another nickname though this is only used for the company chief clerk (in some instances the chief clerk role can be filled by another non-commissioned rank (but not warrant officer) and still be referred to as "Chief"). A staff sergeant ranks above sergeant and below warrant officer class 2.

Israel

For further information, see Israel Defense Forces ranks.
IDF Rank: סמ"ר samar (staff sergeant)

In the Israel Defense Forces, soldiers are promoted from sergeant to staff sergeant (samál rishón) after 28 months of service for combat soldiers, and 32 months of service for non-combat soldiers, if they performed their duties appropriately during this time. Soldiers who take a commander's course may become staff sergeants earlier (usually after 24 months of service, or one year from becoming a commander). The rank insignia is composed of three clear-blue stripes (as is the rank of sergeant) with an embroidered fig leaf, a biblical motif, in the center of the rank insignia. Staff sergeants get a symbolic pay raise.

Norway

OR6 NOR - Oversersjant Hær
Staff sergeant insignia in the Army of Norway.
For further information, see Military ranks and insignia of Norway.

In the Norwegian Defence Forces, the tasks and responsibilities of the staff sergeant (oversersjant) are not clear; quite recently, in January 2016, Norway replaced their old rank system, and implemented a new, which is more adapted to other NATO members.[4] In 1975, all of the Norwegian military branches abolished the system of using non-commissioned officers.[5] Now, however, Norway is reintroducing the Non-Commissioned Officer Corps, allowing people to become officers without graduating from a military academy or having a university degree.

Singapore

Singapore Armed Forces

A staff sergeant (SSG) in the Singapore Armed Forces ranks above first sergeant and below master sergeant. It is the second most senior specialist rank. Staff sergeants are addressed as "Staff Sergeant" or "Staff", but never "Sergeant".[6]

Staff sergeants may be appointed as company sergeant major if they are due for promotion to master sergeant. They are usually addressed as "CSM" in camp, although in the past they were referred to as "Encik", which is now used to address only warrant officers.

The rank insignia consists of two chevrons pointing up and three chevrons pointing down, with the Singapore coat of arms in the middle.[7]

Insignia Army-SGP-OR-5a Army-SGP-OR-5b Army-SGP-OR-5c Army-SGP-OR-6a Army-SGP-OR-6b
Rank Third Sergeant Second Sergeant First Sergeant Staff Sergeant Master Sergeant
Abbreviation 3SG 2SG 1SG SSG MSG

Home Team

In the Singapore Prison Service, the rank of Staff Sergeant (SSGT) is above the rank of Sergeant, and is below the rank of Chief Warder (1). The rank insignia of SSGT is one Singapore coat of arms and three pointed-down chevrons below it.[8]

In the Singapore Police Force, the rank of Staff Sergeant is currently being phased out with the newly overhauled "unified police rank structure" which allows a direct-entry Sergeant to be eligible for emplacement to the rank of Inspector without a degree.

In the past, the rank of Staff Sergeant is above the rank of Sergeant, and below the rank of Senior Staff Sergeant; with the new rank structure being introduced, the rank and insigna of Staff Sergeant is being phased out, and being replaced with three grades of Sergeant, namely, Sergeant (1), Sergeant (2), and Sergeant (3), before being promoted directly to Senior Staff Sergeant. However, all three grades of Sergeants all don the same three chevrons insignia.

Uniformed Youth Organisations

In the National Cadet Corps, Staff Sergeants are cadets who have passed the 3-days 2-nights Senior Specialists Leaders Course successfully. The rank of Staff Sergeant is above First Sergeant and below Master Sergeant.[9] Staff sergeants wear a rank insignia of two pointed-up chevrons, one Singapore coat of arms and three pointed-down chevrons, with the letters 'NCC' located below the insignia to differentiate NCC cadets from SAF personnel.

In the National Police Cadet Corps (NPCC) and the National Civil Defence Cadet Corps (NCDCC), the rank of Staff Sergeant is above Sergeant, and below Station Inspector and Warrant Officer respectively. [10][11] The rank of Staff Sergeant generally is awarded to cadets when they are in Secondary Four, before they pass out. NPCC and NCDCC Staff Sergeants wear a rank insignia of one Singapore coat of arms and three pointed-down chevrons. The letters 'NPCC' and 'NCDCC' are located below the insignia so as to differentiate NPCC and NCDCC cadets from Singapore Police Force and Singapore Civil Defence Force personnel respectively.

In the St John Brigade (SJB), the rank of Staff Sergeant (SSG) is above Sergeant, and below Senior Staff Sergeant. Staff Sergeants in SJB wear a rank insignia of one St John coat of arms and three pointed-down chevrons.

Republic of China (Taiwan)

Taiwan-army-OR-5-H
Rank insignia of Staff Sergeant (中士) in Taiwan.

Staff Sergeant (Chinese: 中士; pinyin: Zhōng Shi) of the R.O.C Armed Forces in Taiwan ranks below Sergeant and above Corporal,[12] making it different from the armed forces of other countries where staff sergeant ranks higher than sergeant. The rank of Staff Sergeant exists in the Army, Air Force and the Marine Corps, and is equivalent to the Petty officer 2nd Class in the Navy.[13]

United Kingdom

Army-GBR-OR-07
Rank markings of a Staff Sergeant in the British Army.

In the British Army, staff sergeant (SSgt or formerly S/Sgt) ranks above sergeant and below warrant officer class 2. The rank is given a NATO code of OR-7. The insignia is the monarch's crown above three downward pointing chevrons.

Staff sergeants can also hold other appointments, such as company quartermaster sergeant, and are usually known by that appointment if held. The equivalent rank in infantry regiments is colour sergeant, and holders are known by that title no matter what their appointment. In the Household Cavalry the equivalent rank is staff corporal.

British staff sergeants are never referred to or addressed as "Sergeant", which would be reducing their rank, but are referred to and addressed as "Staff Sergeant" or "Staff" ("Staff Jones", for instance) or by their appointment or its abbreviation. Quartermaster sergeants are often addressed as "Q". In most cavalry regiments, staff sergeants are addressed as "Sergeant Major", which is assumed to derive from the original rank of troop sergeant major, or as "Sir" by subordinates.

Flight sergeant and chief technician are the Royal Air Force equivalents. Chief petty officer is the equivalent in the Royal Navy and colour sergeant in the Royal Marines.

United States

U.S. Army staff sergeant's arm badge

Staff sergeant insignia
U.S. Army

U.S. Army staff sergeant's arm badge

U.S. Marine Corps staff sergeant's arm badge

Staff sergeant insignia
U.S. Marine Corps

U.S. Marine Corps staff sergeant's arm badge

U.S. Air Force staff sergeant's arm badge

Staff sergeant insignia
U.S. Air Force

U.S. Air Force staff sergeant's arm badge

U.S. Army

Staff sergeant (SSG) is E-6 rank in the U.S. Army, just above sergeant and below sergeant first class, and is a non-commissioned officer. Staff sergeants are generally placed in charge of squads, but can also act as platoon sergeants in the absence of a sergeant first class. In support units, staff sergeants ordinarily hold headquarters positions because of the number of slots available for them in these units. Staff sergeants are typically assigned as a squad leader or company operations non-commissioned officer in charge at the company level, but may also hold other positions depending on the type of unit. Staff sergeants are referred to as "Sergeant" except in certain training environments and schools. The NATO code is OR-6.

The rank of staff sergeant in the U.S. Army, along with technical sergeant (renamed sergeant first class in 1948) and master sergeant, was created by Congress after the First World War.[14] In 1920 the Army combined several company/battery/troop level "staff" NCO ranks, including color sergeant, supply sergeant, radio sergeant, eleven grades of sergeant first class, three grades of sergeant, two grades of master gunner, and assistant band leader into the new rank of staff sergeant. Staff sergeant, as did the ranks it combined/replaced, then ranked above sergeant but below first sergeant. At that time, sergeants served as section leaders, platoon guides, and assistants to platoon commanders (the position of platoon sergeant, nor a separate rank for the position, did not yet exist), and included several formerly separate ranks such as mess sergeant, company supply sergeant, and stable sergeant, etc. In 1940, staff sergeant became the rank title of rifle platoon sergeants and in 1942 rifle squad leaders became staff sergeants, with platoon sergeants then being promoted to technical sergeants. (Perrenot, 2009)[15]

U.S. Marine Corps

Staff Sergeant (SSgt) is E-6 rank (NATO code OR-6) in the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC), ranking above Sergeant and below Gunnery Sergeant. This grade is normally achieved after 10 years in service.

A Marine Staff Sergeant is a staff non-commissioned officer rank (SNCO). These SNCOs are career Marines serving as staff sergeants through master gunnery sergeant/sergeant major/Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps in grades E-6 through E-9. Together, they are responsible to the commanding officer for the welfare, morale, discipline, and efficiency of Marines in their charge. Using their experience gained by time in service, including previous deployments, proven military skills and advanced leadership training, SNCOs are responsible for the proficiency, training and administrative issue of their Marines.

Staff sergeants in infantry, and light armored reconnaissance units typically serve in the billet of platoon sergeant of a 42-member rifle platoon, an 18-member scout sniper platoon (infantry battalion H&S company S-2 section) or a 24-member light armored reconnaissance platoon. In reconnaissance battalions, staff sergeants usually serve as squad/team leaders of a 6-member reconnaissance team. When serving as a platoon sergeant, they are the senior tactical advisor to the platoon commander (an officer) and the second-in-command of the platoon.

Staff sergeants also serve as a section leaders in weapons platoons (the platoon sergeant being a gunnery sergeant in weapons platoons) leading from 8 – 27 Marines in a crew-served weapons section (i.e., machine guns, mortars, assault weapons/rockets, and anti-tank missiles). In artillery batteries staff sergeants serve as either the local security chief/platoon sergeant of a firing battery's 94-member firing platoon or as section chief of a 10-member artillery section (viz., gun crew). In tank and assault amphibian units, they serve as section leaders in charge of 8 Marines manning two tanks or 9 Marines manning three AAVs, respectively, under a gunnery sergeant serving as platoon sergeant. When there is a shortage of gunnery sergeants, they may be assigned to a billet of platoon sergeant or company/battery gunnery sergeant, and in the event of a shortage of officers may be temporarily billeted as a platoon commander.

Staff sergeants also serve as staff non-commissioned officers in military staff sections and headquarters and service companies/headquarters batteries at battalion/squadron, regiment/group, division/wing level. Typical staff sergeant billets found in combat support companies and battalion, regiment, and division headquarters are: Personnel Chief, Senior Administration Clerk, Career Planner, Human Affairs NCO, Education/Personal Affairs Assistant, Senior Combat Photographer, Substance Abuse Counselor, Reports NCO, MAGTF Plans Chief, NBC Defense NCO/Training NCO, Intelligence Chief, Senior Intelligence Analyst, Special Security Office Chief, Operations Chief, Operations Assistant, Logistics Chief, Maintenance Management Chief, Ammunition Chief, Senior Ammunition Technician, Local Security Chief, Senior Radio Technician, Wire Chief/Supervisor, Radio Supervisor, Senior Field Radio Operator, Supply Chief, Senior General Warehouseman, Senior Small Arms Repair Technician, Senior Electro-Optical Ordnance Repairman, Motor Vehicle Maintenance Chief, Motor Operations Chief, Assistant Mess Manager, Cook Specialist, and Senior Chief Cook.

In Command Element, Combat Logistics Element, and Aviation Combat Element organizations, staff sergeants serve in basically similar positions of responsibility, authority, and accountability as their Ground Combat Element counterparts, with perhaps slightly different titles, such as Branch/Section Chief/NCOIC (Non-Commissioned Officer-In-Charge) in various work centers (e.g. mechanical, avionics, electrical, and ordnance divisions) within the aircraft maintenance department of a Marine aircraft squadron. Non Fleet Marine Force (or other operating forces) assignments may include supervisory or staff positions in recruiting, drill instructor, Marine Security Guard, Naval ROTC instructor or service school instructor, and major/joint/combined headquarters commands.

Staff sergeants, as are all Marine Corps SNCOs, addressed and referred to by their complete rank title (i.e. "Staff Sergeant Jones" or simply "Staff Sergeant," with the abbreviation "SSgt").

The rank of Staff Sergeant in the USMC was created in 1923 to coincide with the U.S. Army's ranks.[16] Until the end of WW2, the insignia of platoon sergeant was three chevrons and a rocker, with Staff Sergeant having a horizontal stripe instead of a rocker below the chevrons. After the separate rank of Platoon Sergeant was eliminated, the Staff Sergeant rank switched over to the rocker insignia and Staff Sergeants held the platoon sergeant's billet.

U.S. Air Force

Staff sergeant (SSgt) is E-5 in the U.S. Air Force. It ranks above senior airman and below technical sergeant. It is the Air Force's first non-commissioned officer rank, as well as the first Air Force rank to which promotion is attained on a competitive basis. Sergeants, also known in Air Force jargon as "buck sergeant"', no longer exist, having been eliminated in the 1990s after sharing the same pay grade with that of the rank of senior airman (E-4). Staff sergeants are expected to be technically proficient and function as first-line supervisors within a 'work center'. After being selected for promotion, senior airmen must attend Airman Leadership School, which teaches them basic leadership skills and how to write performance reports to become staff sergeant. The term of address is "Staff Sergeant" or "Sergeant". High year of tenure is 20 years as of 2018.

Cadet staff sergeant

The rank of cadet staff sergeant (CSSG or C/SSgt) is used by many cadet organisations around the world, including the Army Cadet Force and the Army Section of the Combined Cadet Force in the United Kingdom, and the cadet program of Civil Air Patrol in the United States.

Police rank

The rank of staff sergeant is used in some police forces to indicate a senior supervisor. The rank is used, for example, in most Canadian police services. Other national police services (for example, Cyprus) have a corresponding rank of senior sergeant. In the United Kingdom, a few police forces formerly used the rank of station sergeant, with the same rank insignia as an army staff sergeant. The Hong Kong Police Force still uses this rank.

Other uses

A number of other organisations, basing their structure on military ranks, have historically used, or still use, the rank of staff sergeant. The rank of staff sergeant was, for example, phased out of the rank structure of St John Ambulance (England and the Islands) in the early 1990s.

See also

References

  1. ^ "British Army ranks". United Kingdom: National Army Museum. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  2. ^ "Staff Sergeant; A history of the rank and some examples of the badge". Digger History. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 7 October 2015.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Prop. 111 LS (2014–2015)" (PDF). The Royal Norwegian Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 1 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Forsvaret innfører ny personellordning". The Norwegian Government. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  6. ^ "SAF Military Ranks – Specialists". Mindef.gov.sg.
  7. ^ Singapore Armed Forces ranks
  8. ^ "Singapore Prison Service / 新加坡监狱部门 - Perkhidmatan Penjara Singapura". www.uniforminsignia.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  9. ^ "NCC Ranks and Badges". Anglo Chinese School (Independent). Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  10. ^ "National Civil Defence Cadet Corps (NCDCC) / National Civil Defence Cadet Corps (NCDCC)". www.uniforminsignia.org. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  11. ^ "National Police Cadet Corps". www.npcc.org.sg. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  12. ^ "Act of Commission for Officers and Noncommissioned Officers of the Armed Forces Commission Act for Officers and Noncommissioned Officers of the Armed Forces (陸海空軍軍官士官任官條例)". Laws and Regulations Database , Ministry of National Defense, R.O.C. Archived from the original on 9 July 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  13. ^ "Chinese-English translation chart (中英對照表)". Military Service Bureau, Kaohsiung City Government. Archived from the original on 28 December 2016. Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  14. ^ "A Short History of the NCO". Archived from the original on 14 April 2008. Retrieved 1 April 2008.
  15. ^ Perrenot, P. United States Army Grade Insignia Since 1776 (2009).
  16. ^ "World War II era Marine Corps enlisted ranks". Ww2gyrene.org.

External links

Brothers in Arms (video game series)

Brothers in Arms is a tactical shooter video game series by Gearbox Software, consisting of ten individual games. The core series consisting of the first-person shooters Brothers in Arms: Road to Hill 30 (2005), Brothers in Arms: Earned in Blood (2005), and Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway (2008). The storyline is set against the backdrop of the liberation of Western Europe during World War II. It has mainly been released for Windows and MacOS platforms as well as sixth and seventh generation consoles and some mobile devices.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of enlisted rank for Air Forces of African states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Asian states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of Europe

Rank comparison chart of air forces enlisted personnel of European states.

Comparative air force enlisted ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of air forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of Africa

Rank comparison chart of enlisted rank for armies/ land forces of African states.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of Asia

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Asian states.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of Europe

Rank comparison chart of all armies and land forces of European states.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of Oceania

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Oceania states.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of the Americas

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of North and South American states.

Comparative army enlisted ranks of the Commonwealth

Rank comparison chart of armies/ land forces of Commonwealth of Nations states.

Interstate 275 (Ohio–Indiana–Kentucky)

Interstate 275 (I-275) is an 83.71-mile-long (134.72 km) highway in Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky that forms a complete beltway around the Cincinnati area, and includes a part in a state (Indiana) not entered by the parent route. It had been the only auxiliary interstate that enters three states, but that changed in July 2018 when I-295 in Delaware and New Jersey was extended into Pennsylvania. It is the longest beltway with an Interstate highway designation in the United States, enclosing an area of over 250,000 acres (100,000 ha). It is also the third longest beltway overall in the United States—only the Sam Houston Tollway and the Grand Parkway encircling Metro Houston are longer. For a short distance in northwest Hamilton County it overlaps with I-74 and U.S. Highway 52 (US 52).

I-275 is also known as the Cincinnati Bypass and officially known as the Donald H. Rolf Circle Freeway in Ohio, after a state senator, but locals rarely use these names, instead simply referring to it as "two-seventy-five." In 2011, Kentucky named its segment the Ronald Reagan Highway, not to be confused with Ronald Reagan Cross County Highway across the river in Cincinnati. The section in Clermont County is also designated as the Staff Sergeant Matt Maupin Veterans Memorial Highway.

List of Medal of Honor recipients for World War II

This is a list of Medal of Honor recipients for World War II. The Medal of Honor was created during the American Civil War and is the highest military decoration presented by the United States government to a member of its armed forces. The recipient must have distinguished themselves at the risk of their own life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an "enemy of the United States" or an "opposing foreign force". Due to the nature of this medal, it is commonly presented posthumously.World War II, or the Second World War, was a global military conflict, the joining of what had initially been two separate conflicts. The first began in Asia in 1937 as the Second Sino-Japanese War; the other began in Europe in 1939 with the German and Soviet invasion of Poland. This global conflict split the majority of the world's nations into two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis powers.

The United States was drawn into World War II on December 8, 1941, a day after the Axis-member Japan launched a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor in Honolulu that killed almost 2,500 people in what was considered the biggest peacetime loss on American soil inflicted by foreign people at that time.

For actions during World War II, 472 United States military personnel received the Medal of Honor. Seventeen of these were Japanese-Americans fighting in both Europe and the Pacific, many of which were upgraded from Distinguished Service Crosses during the Clinton administration. Additionally, Douglas Albert Munro was the only serviceman from the United States Coast Guard in United States military history to receive the Medal for his actions during the war.

The earliest action for which a U.S. serviceman earned a World War II Medal of Honor was the attack on Pearl Harbor, for which 17 U.S. servicemen were awarded a Medal, although they did so "while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force" rather than "enemy" since the United States was neutral during the events of December 7, 1941. The last action to earn a contemporaneous Medal of Honor prior to the August 15, 1945, end of hostilities in World War II, were those of Melvin Mayfield, on July 29, 1945 – though several honorees may have been cited for their Medal after Mayfield's recognition on May 31, 1946. Additionally, seven African Americans and twenty-two Asian American veterans who had received the Distinguished Service Cross during the war were awarded the Medal of Honor in 1997 and 2000 – most of them posthumously – after two studies determined that racial discrimination had caused them to be overlooked at the time.

Mackay Trophy

The Mackay Trophy is awarded yearly by the United States Air Force for the "most meritorious flight of the year" by an Air Force person, persons, or organization. The trophy is housed in the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum. The award is administered by the U.S. National Aeronautic Association.

The award was established on 27 January 1911 by Clarence Mackay, who was then head of the Postal Telegraph-Cable Company and the Commercial Cable Company. Originally, aviators could compete for the trophy annually under rules made each year or the War Department could award the trophy for the most meritorious flight of the year.

Maywand District murders

The Maywand District killings were the murders of at least three Afghan civilians perpetrated by a group of U.S. Army soldiers in 2010, during the War in Afghanistan. The soldiers, who referred to themselves as the "Kill Team", were members of the 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment and 5th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division. They were based at FOB Ramrod in Maiwand, from Kandahar Province of Afghanistan.During the summer of 2010, the military charged five members of the platoon with murder of three Afghan civilians in Kandahar Province and collecting their body parts as trophies. In addition, seven soldiers were charged with crimes such as hashish use, impeding an investigation, and attacking the whistleblower, Private First Class Justin Stoner.In March 2011, U.S. Army Specialist Jeremy Morlock pleaded guilty to three counts of premeditated murder. He told the court that he had helped to kill unarmed native Afghans in faked combat situations. Under a plea deal, Morlock received 24 years in prison for murdering three Afghan civilians in return for testimony against other soldiers. Staff Sergeant Calvin Gibbs, the highest-ranking soldier and the ringleader, was also convicted on three counts of premeditated murder and sentenced to life in prison. Private First Class Andrew Holmes pleaded guilty to murder without premeditation and was sentenced to seven years in prison. Specialist Adam C. Winfield, who informed his father after the first murder and whose father attempted to alert the Army, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to three years in prison. In total, eleven of the twelve soldiers charged were convicted of crimes. All charges against the twelfth soldier, Specialist Michael Wagnon, were dropped by the U.S. military "in the interest of justice" without further explanation. PFC Justin Stoner, who initiated the case by reporting the murders to his superiors, was not charged.

Ranks in the French Air Force

Rank insignia in the French air force are worn on the sleeve or on shoulder marks of uniforms

Ranks in the French Army

See Ranks in the French Navy for more details about the naval ranks

Rank insignia in the French Army are worn on the sleeve or on shoulder marks of uniforms, and range up to the highest rank of Marshal of France, a state honour denoted with a seven-star insignia that was last conferred posthumously on Marie Pierre Koenig in 1984.

Sergeant

Sergeant ( SARJ-ənt; abbreviated to Sgt and capitalized when used as a named person's title) is a rank in many uniformed organizations, principally military and policing forces. The alternate spelling, "serjeant", is used in The Rifles and other units that draw their heritage from the British Light Infantry. Its origin is the Latin "serviens", "one who serves", through the French term "sergent".

The term "sergeant" refers to a non-commissioned officer placed above the rank of a corporal and a police officer immediately below a lieutenant or, in the UK Police forces, below an inspector.

In most armies the rank of sergeant corresponds to command of a squad (or section). In Commonwealth armies, it is a more senior rank, corresponding roughly to a platoon second-in-command. In the United States Army, sergeant is a more junior rank corresponding to a four-soldier fireteam leader.

More senior non-commissioned ranks are often variations on sergeant, for example staff sergeant, first sergeant, and sergeant major.

Many countries use sergeant rank, whether in English or using a cognate with the same origin in another language. The equivalent rank in Arab armies is "raqeeb", meaning "overseer" or "watcher".

Squad

In military terminology, a squad is a sub-subunit led by a non-commissioned officer that is subordinate to an infantry platoon. In countries following the British Army tradition (Indian Army, Australian Army, Canadian Army, and others), this organization is referred to as a section. In most armies, a squad consists of eight to fourteen soldiers, and may be further subdivided into fireteams.

Navies Armies Air forces
Commissioned officers
Admiral of
the fleet
Field marshal or
General of the army
Marshal of
the air force
Admiral General Air chief marshal
Vice admiral Lieutenant general Air marshal
Rear admiral Major general Air vice-marshal
Commodore Brigadier or
brigadier general
Air commodore
Captain Colonel Group captain
Commander Lieutenant colonel Wing commander
Lieutenant
commander
Major or
commandant
Squadron leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight lieutenant
Lieutenant
junior grade
or
sub-lieutenant
Lieutenant or
first lieutenant
Flying officer
Ensign or
midshipman
Second lieutenant Pilot officer
Officer cadet Officer cadet Flight cadet
Enlisted grades
Warrant officer or
chief petty officer
Warrant officer or
sergeant major
Warrant officer
Petty officer Sergeant Flight sergeant
Leading seaman Corporal or
bombardier
Corporal
Seaman Private or
gunner or
trooper
Aircraftman or
airman
Talk·View
United States enlisted ranks
Pay grade
Branch of service
E-1 E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5 E-6 E-7 E-8 E-9
Private
PVT
Private 2
PV2
Private first class
PFC
Specialist Corporal
SPCCPL
Sergeant
SGT
Staff Sergeant
SSG
Sergeant first class
SFC
Master Sergeant First Sergeant
MSG1SG
Sergeant Major Command Sergeant Major Sergeant Major of the Army
SGMCSMSMA
Private
Pvt
Private first class
PFC
Lance Corporal
LCpl
Corporal
Cpl
Sergeant
Sgt
Staff Sergeant
SSgt
Gunnery Sergeant
GySgt
Master Sergeant First sergeant
MSgt1stSgt
Master Gunnery Sergeant Sergeant Major Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps
MGySgtSgtMajSMMC
Seaman recruit
SR
Seaman apprentice
SA
Seaman
SN
Petty Officer Third Class
PO3
Petty Officer Second Class
PO2
Petty Officer first class
PO1
Chief Petty Officer
CPO
Senior Chief Petty Officer Command Senior Chief Petty Officer
SCPOCMDCS
Master Chief Petty Officer Command Master Chief Petty Officer Fleet Master Chief Petty Officer / Force Master Chief Petty Officer Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
MCPOCMDCMFORCM, FLTCMMCPON
Airman basic
AB
Airman
Amn
Airman first class
A1C
Senior Airman
SrA
Staff Sergeant
SSgt
Technical sergeant
TSgt
Master Sergeant Master Sergeant
MSgt1st Sgt
Senior Master Sergeant Senior Master Sergeant
SMSgt1st Sgt
Chief Master Sergeant Chief Master Sergeant Command Chief Master Sergeant Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force
CMSgt1st SgtCCMCMSAF
Seaman Recruit
SR
border
SA
border
SN
Petty Officer Third Class
PO3
Petty Officer Second Class
PO2
Petty Officer first class
PO1
Chief Petty Officer
CPO
Senior Chief Petty Officer
SCPO
Master Chief Petty Officer Command Master Chief Petty Officer Area Command Master Chief Petty Officer, CMC Reserve Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard
MCPOCMC – Area CMC, CGRF-CMC – MCPOCG

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