Sports teams in Virginia

Sports teams in Virginia include several professional teams, but no professional major-league teams. Virginia is the most populous U.S. state without a major professional sports league franchise playing within its borders, although two of the major-league teams representing Washington, D.C.—the NFL's Washington Redskins and NHL's Washington Capitals—have their practice facilities and operational headquarters in Northern Virginia.

Major league teams

There have been proposals to locate stadiums for Washington, D.C.-based teams in Northern Virginia or to locate teams in the Hampton Roads metro area surrounding Norfolk, but none have come to fruition. When Jack Kent Cooke decided to build a replacement for the aging RFK Stadium as home of the Washington Redskins, he considered a site in Alexandria until public opposition developed. An attempt to bring a National Hockey League expansion franchise to Norfolk in the late 1990s was rejected by the NHL, with the expansion franchise instead becoming the Columbus Blue Jackets.

The Houston Astros were nearly sold and relocated to Northern Virginia in 1996, but Major League Baseball owners stepped in and scuttled the proposed transaction in order to give Houston time to approve a new stadium deal. A proposal to relocate the Montreal Expos to Norfolk was considered by Major League Baseball in 2004. MLB had also considered a site near Washington Dulles International Airport in Loudoun County as a possible new home for the Expos. However, a reluctance by state officials to dedicate funds to the project along with concern about traffic helped lead MLB to select Washington as the Expos' new home. The ownership of the Florida Marlins had mentioned Norfolk as one of the cities to which it could relocate the team, but the Marlins will now remain in South Florida for the foreseeable future since they moved to a new park in Miami in 2012, adopting their current name of Miami Marlins at that time.

The Virginia Squires played in the American Basketball Association from 1970 to 1976; the team was left out of that league's partial merger with the NBA after the 1975 and 1976 season.

Other teams

The Virginia Destroyers played in the United Football League in 2011, and began playing in the 2012 season, however the Destroyers folded, along with the rest of the UFL.

List

Club Sport League
Bluefield Blue Jays Baseball Appalachian League
Bristol Pirates Baseball Appalachian League
Danville Braves Baseball Appalachian League
Lynchburg Hillcats Baseball Carolina League
Loudoun United FC Soccer USL Championship
Norfolk Tides Baseball International League
Potomac Nationals Baseball Carolina League
Pulaski Yankees Baseball Appalachian League
Richmond Flying Squirrels Baseball Eastern League
Salem Red Sox Baseball Carolina League
Richmond Elite Basketball American Basketball Association
Virginia Rampage Dodgeball National Dodgeball League
Virginia Cyclones Football East Coast Football Association
Richmond Raiders Football Professional Indoor Football League
Norfolk Admirals Ice hockey ECHL
Roanoke Rail Yard Dawgs Ice hockey SPHL
Northern Virginia Eagles Rugby league USA Rugby League
Hampton Roads Piranhas Soccer USL League Two
Virginia Beach City FC Soccer National Premier Soccer League
Hampton Roads Piranhas Soccer W-League
Northern Virginia Royals Soccer USL League Two
Richmond Kickers Soccer USL League One
Richmond Kickers Destiny Soccer W-League
A.G. Dillard Motorsports

A.G. Dillard Motorsports was a NASCAR Winston Cup series team owned by Virginian Alan G. Dillard. This team is most notable for giving future Daytona 500 and Southern 500 champion Ward Burton his start in Winston Cup.

Northern Virginia Eagles

The Northern Virginia Eagles are a rugby league team based in Manassas, Virginia, U.S. The club currently plays in the USA Rugby League (USARL). From 2007 to 2011 they were known as the Fairfax Eagles and were based in nearby Fairfax, Virginia.

The Fairfax Eagles were founded in 2007 as an expansion team of the American National Rugby League (AMNRL), but did not begin play until the 2008 season. They competed in the AMNRL for three years, making playoff appearances in 2009 and 2010. In January 2011 the Eagles became one of seven teams to depart from the AMNRL to form the new USA Rugby League (USARL), but the team ceased operations before the season. In 2012, new ownership announced the team, reorganized as the Northern Virginia Eagles, would return to the AMNRL for the 2012 season.

In 2014, the Northern Virginia Eagles joined the USA Rugby League (USARL).

Outline of Virginia

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the U.S. state of Virginia:

Virginia (officially, the Commonwealth of Virginia) – U.S. state located in the South Atlantic region of the United States. Virginia is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as a former dominion of the English Crown, and "Mother of Presidents" due to the most U.S. presidents having been born there. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The Commonwealth's estimated population as of 2013 is over 8.2 million.

Richmond Rebels

The Richmond Rebels were one of eight teams in the United States Baseball League, and were based in Richmond, Virginia. The league collapsed within two months of its creation from May 1 to June 24, 1912. The Rebels were managed by Alfred Newman and owned by Ernest Landgraf.

Richmond Rhythm

The Richmond Rhythm were a professional basketball team based in Richmond, Virginia from 1999 to 2001. The team played in the International Basketball League. They played their home games at Siegel Center on the campus of Virginia Commonwealth University.

Robinson Rams

The Robinson Rams are the athletic teams of Robinson Secondary School of Fairfax, Virginia, a suburb southwest of Washington, D.C. The school's athletic program includes 18 VHSL 6A varsity sports which compete in the Concorde District of the Group 6A North Region, formerly the AAA Northern Region.

Sports in Richmond, Virginia

Richmond, Virginia, United States, is home to three professional sports teams, though none of which compete in any major professional league. Virginia is the most populated state without a major sports team. In 2008, the Richmond Braves minor league baseball team left for Gwinnett County, Georgia, and was replaced by the Richmond Flying Squirrels in 2010. But now, the Flying Squirrels' owner has threatened to leave Richmond if they do not replace their current stadium, the Diamond. The Richmond Kickers are a non-profit soccer team that plays at City Stadium.

Richmond has also come into the national spotlight in recent years due to the success of the region's two Division I college basketball teams, the VCU Rams and Richmond Spiders. The VCU Rams men's basketball team reached the Final Four of the 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, while the Richmond Spiders men's basketball team reached the Sweet 16 of the same tournament.

As of 2016, Richmond is also home to its first women's sports team, the Richmond Black Widows. They are in the Women's Football Alliance and play at Hovey Field. The expansion team plays in Tier III of the Women's Football Alliance and is the National Conference Champion.

The Washington Redskins hold training camp in Richmond every year.

Washington Glory

The Washington Glory was a women's softball team based in Fairfax, Virginia. They played during 2007 and 2008 as a member of National Pro Fastpitch.

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