Sports Reference

Sports Reference, LLC is a company which operates several sports-related websites including Baseball-Reference.com, Pro-Football-Reference.com, Basketball Reference, and Hockey Reference.[1]

Sports Reference
Private
Industrysports technology, data, and content
Predecessor
FoundedAugust 2004
FounderSean Forman
Headquarters,
Products
  • Baseball Reference
  • Basektball Reference
  • Football Reference
  • Hockey Reference
WebsiteSports-Reference.com

Description

The site also includes sections on college football, college basketball and the Olympics.[2] The sites attempt a comprehensive approach to sports data. For example, Baseball-Reference.com contains more than 100,000 box scores and Pro-Football-Reference.com contains data on every scoring play in the National Football League since 1941.[1]

The company, which is based in the Mt. Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was founded as Sports Reference in 2004 and was incorporated as Sports Reference LLC in 2007.[3][1][4]

Olympics

SR-Olympics
Sports Reference Olympics logo

Sports Reference added a site for Olympic Games statistics and history in July 2008.[5][6]

The company announced in December 2016 that the Olympics site will be shut down in the near future due to a change in its data licensing agreement.[7] Since that time, data for the 2016 Summer Olympics was added,[8] but the site has not been updated for the 2018 Winter Olympics.[9] The providers of the Olympic data are working with another publisher to create a new website.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b c Kramer, Staci D. (February 17, 2009). "Fantasy Sports Ventures Takes Minority Stake In Sports Reference LLC". CBS MoneyWatch. PaidContent. Archived from the original on November 8, 2013. Retrieved November 8, 2013.
  2. ^ "Sports Reference Main Page". Retrieved April 2, 2014.
  3. ^ Wagner, James (13 February 2019). "From a Church in Philadelphia, Sports Reference Informs the World". New York Times. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  4. ^ "Company Overview of Sports Reference, LLC". Bloomberg Businessweek. Archived from the original on November 8, 2013. Retrieved November 8, 2013.
  5. ^ "Olympics at Sports Reference Launches". Sports-Reference.com. July 9, 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-07-26.
  6. ^ "About SR/Olympics". Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 2008-07-29. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  7. ^ a b "We'll Be Closing Soon". Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 2016-12-19. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  8. ^ "2016 Rio de Janeiro Summer Games". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 2018-07-20.
  9. ^ "Winter Games Index". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved 2018-07-20.

External links

1920 Summer Olympics

The 1920 Summer Olympics (French: Les Jeux olympiques d'été de 1920; Dutch: Olympische Zomerspelen van de VIIe Olympiade; German: Olympische Sommerspiele 1920), officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium.

In March 1912, during the 13th session of the IOC, Belgium's bid to host the 1920 Summer Olympics was made by Baron Édouard de Laveleye, president of the Belgian Olympic Committee and of the Royal Belgian Football Association. No fixed host city was proposed at the time.

The 1916 Summer Olympics, to be held in Berlin, capital of the German Empire, were cancelled due to World War I. The aftermath of the war and the Paris Peace Conference, 1919 affected the Olympic Games not only due to new states being created, but also by sanctions against the nations that lost the war and were blamed for starting it. Hungary, Germany, Austria, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire were banned from competing in the Games. Germany did not return to Olympic competition until 1928 and instead hosted a series of games called Deutsche Kampfspiele, starting with the Winter edition of 1922 (which predated the first Winter Olympics).

The sailing events were held in Ostend, Belgium, and two in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

1962 World Rowing Championships

The 1962 World Rowing Championships were the inaugural world championships in rowing. The competition was held in September 1962 on the Rotsee in Lucerne, Switzerland. Rowers from West Germany dominated the competition, winning five of the seven boat classes.

Baseball-Reference.com

Baseball-Reference.com is a website providing baseball statistics for every player in Major League Baseball history. The site is often used by major media organizations and baseball broadcasters as a source for statistics. It offers a variety of advanced baseball sabermetrics in addition to traditional baseball "counting stats".

Baseball-Reference.com is part of Sports Reference, LLC; according to an article in Street & Smith's Sports Business Journal, the company's sites have more than 1 million unique users per month.

Case Keenum

Casey Austin "Case" Keenum (born February 17, 1988) is an American football quarterback for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Houston, where he became the NCAA's all-time leader in total passing yards, touchdowns, and completions. In the 2008 college football season, Keenum ranked first nationally in total offense and second in total passing yards. During the 2011 season, Keenum became the Football Bowl Subdivision's all-time leader in total offense, as well as the all-time leader in total touchdown passes by an FBS quarterback. As a result of his on-field contributions to Houston's success, Keenum was named to several All-American lists. He is the only quarterback in Division I FBS football history to have passed for more than 5,000 yards in each of three seasons.

After being signed by the Houston Texans as an undrafted free agent in 2012, Keenum threw for 1,760 yards and 9 touchdowns in the eight games he started for the Texans, before being waived prior to the 2014 season. Keenum was then signed to the St. Louis Rams' practice squad. He re-signed with the Texans later in 2014. In 2015, the Rams traded a draft pick to the Texans for Keenum, where he played until signing as a free agent with the Minnesota Vikings in 2017. After starter Sam Bradford got injured, Keenum came in and had a career year, setting highs in starts, passing yards, completions and touchdowns. He led the Vikings to a 13-win regular season, followed by a last-second win over the New Orleans Saints in the divisional round of the playoffs; the Vikings lost in the next round to the eventual Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles. In 2018, Keenum signed a two-year contract with the Denver Broncos, playing for them for one season before being traded to the Redskins in 2019.

Cincinnati Bearcats football

The Cincinnati Bearcats football program represents the University of Cincinnati in college football. They compete at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level as members of the American Athletic Conference, and have played their home games in historic Nippert Stadium since 1924. The Bearcats have an all-time record of over .500 as of 2018, having reached their 600th program victory in 2017. The team has had a bit of a resurgence in the past few years, going 98-56 since 2006, along with 9 bowl game appearances, 5 conference titles, two BCS Bowl berths, and 22 NFL Draft selections.

Colorado State Rams football

The Colorado State Rams football program, established in 1893, represents Colorado State University and is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision and Mountain West Conference. Rams football teams have had relative success over the years, including winning or sharing the Mountain West title in 1999, 2000 and 2002. The team's current head coach is Mike Bobo.

The Rams completed a 49-season tenure at Sonny Lubick Field at Hughes Stadium, located four miles west of the school's campus in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, in 2016. The university completed construction of Canvas Stadium, a new on-campus facility, in 2017. The first game at Canvas Stadium (then named Colorado State Stadium for only the 2017 season) was played on August 26, 2017, when the Rams defeated the Oregon State Beavers 58-27. The Rams have long-standing rivalries with Colorado, Wyoming, and Air Force.

Illinois Fighting Illini football

The Illinois Fighting Illini football program represents the University of Illinois in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) level. Illinois has five national championships and 15 Big Ten championships.

List of American League pennant winners

Each season, one American League (AL) team wins the pennant, signifying that they are the league's champion and have the right to play in the World Series against the champion of the National League. The pennant was presented to the team with the best win–loss record each year through the 1968 season, after which the American League Championship Series (ALCS) was introduced to decide the pennant winner. The first modern World Series was played in 1903 and, after a hiatus in 1904, has taken place every season except 1994, when a players' strike forced the cancellation of the postseason. The current American League pennant holders are the Boston Red Sox who won in October 2018.

In 1969, the league split into two divisions, and the teams with the best records in each division played one another in the five-game ALCS to determine the pennant winner, who received (and continues to receive) the William Harridge Trophy. The trophy featured a golden eagle, the league's emblem, sitting atop a silver baseball and clutching the American League banner. Since 2017, the trophy is all silver with a pennant on top. The trophy is named for Will Harridge, who was league president from 1931 to 1958. The format of the ALCS was changed from a best-of-five to a best-of-seven format in the 1985 postseason. In 1995, an additional playoff series was added when Major League Baseball restructured into three divisions in each league. As of 2010, the winners of the Eastern, Central, and Western Divisions, as well as the AL Wild Card winner, play in the American League Division Series, a best-of-five playoff to determine the opponents who will play in the ALCS. American League pennant winners have gone on to win the World Series 66 times, most recently in 2018.

The New York Yankees have won 40 AL pennants, winning their first in 1921 and their most recent in 2009. This total is more than twice that of the next-closest team, the Oakland Athletics, who have won 15. They are followed by the Boston Red Sox and the Detroit Tigers, with 14 and 11 pennants won respectively. The Yankees have the most pennants since the introduction of the ALCS in 1969 with 11, followed by the Athletics and the Baltimore Orioles with 6 and 5 respectively. The Yankees also hold the record for most wins by a pennant-winning team, with their 1998 team winning 114 out of 162 games, finishing 22 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. The 1954 Cleveland Indians won the most games of any pennant winner under the pre-1969 system, winning 111 out of their 154 games and finishing eight games ahead of the Yankees. The Milwaukee Brewers won the American League pennant in 1982 but later moved to the National League starting in the 1998 season.The only American League team to have never won a pennant is the Seattle Mariners.

List of Chicago Bears starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Bears.

List of Los Angeles Lakers seasons

The Los Angeles Lakers are an American professional basketball team based in Los Angeles, California that competes in the National Basketball Association (NBA), which was formerly called the Basketball Association of America (BAA). Since 1999, the Lakers have played their home games at Staples Center. The Lakers' franchise was founded in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The first owners purchased the disbanded Gems from Detroit, Michigan, then renamed and moved the team. It was in Minneapolis where the Lakers received their official title from Minnesota's nickname, Land of 10,000 Lakes. The Lakers won five championships before relocating to Los Angeles for the 1960–61 NBA season. The Lakers went on to lose all of their eight appearances in the NBA Finals in the 1960s, despite the presence of Elgin Baylor and Jerry West. In 1972, the Lakers compiled a 33-game winning streak, the longest streak in U.S. professional team sports, and won their sixth title, under coach Bill Sharman. The Lakers' popularity soared in the 1980s when they won five additional championships during a nine-year span with the help of Hall of Famers Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, James Worthy and coach Pat Riley, the franchise's all-time leader in both regular season and playoff games coached and wins. Two of those championships during that span were against their arch-rivals, the Boston Celtics. With the help of Shaquille O'Neal, Kobe Bryant, and Hall of Fame coach Phil Jackson, the Lakers played in seven NBA Finals between 2000 and 2010, winning three of them consecutively from 2000 to 2002, losing the next two in 2004 and 2008, and winning in 2009 and 2010; the last three appearances were without O'Neal.

The Lakers hold records for having (at the end of the 2014–15 NBA season) the most wins (3,125), the highest winning percentage (.620), the most NBA Finals appearances (31) of any NBA franchise, second-fewest non-playoff seasons with seven and are second NBA championships with 16, behind the Boston Celtics' 17. They have won 60+ regular season games 11 times, trailing only the Boston Celtics in this category.

List of NCAA Division I men's basketball champions

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men's Division I Basketball Championship, or NCAA Tournament, is a single-elimination tournament for men's college basketball teams in the United States. It determines the champion of Division I, the top level of play in the NCAA, and the media often describes the winner as the national champion of college basketball. The NCAA Tournament has been held annually since 1939, and its field grew from eight teams in the beginning to sixty-five teams by 2001; as of 2011, sixty-eight teams take part in the tournament. Teams can gain invitations by winning a conference championship or receiving an at-large bid from a 10-person committee. The semifinals of the tournament are known as the Final Four and are held in a different city each year, along with the championship game; Indianapolis, the city where the NCAA is based, will host the Final Four every five years until 2040. Each winning university receives a rectangular, gold-plated trophy made of wood.The first NCAA Tournament was organized by the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Oregon won the inaugural tournament, defeating Ohio State 46–33 in the first championship game. Before the 1941 tournament, control of the event was given to the NCAA. In the early years of the tournament, it was considered less important than the National Invitation Tournament (NIT), a New York City-based event. Teams were able to compete in both events in the same year, and three of those that did so—Utah in 1944, Kentucky in 1949, and City College of New York (CCNY) in 1950—won the NCAA Tournament. The 1949–50 CCNY team won both tournaments (defeating Bradley in both finals), and is the only college basketball team to accomplish this feat. By the mid-1950s, the NCAA Tournament became the more prestigious of the two events, and in 1971 the NCAA barred universities from playing in other tournaments, such as the NIT, if they were invited to the NCAA Tournament. The 2013 championship won by Louisville was the first men's basketball national title to ever be vacated by the NCAA after the school and its coach at the time, Rick Pitino, were implicated in a 2015 sex scandal involving recruits.The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) has been the most successful college in the NCAA Tournament, winning 11 national titles. Ten of those championships came during a 12-year stretch from 1964 to 1975. UCLA also holds the record for the most consecutive championships, winning seven in a row from 1967 to 1973. Kentucky has the second-most titles, with eight. North Carolina is third with six championships, while Duke and Indiana follow with five each. Villanova is the most recent champion, having defeated Michigan in the final of the 2018 tournament. Among head coaches, John Wooden is the all-time leader with 10 championships; he coached UCLA during their period of success in the 1960s and 1970s. Duke's Mike Krzyzewski is second all-time with five titles.

List of NHL players with 1,000 games played

The National Hockey League (NHL) is a major professional ice hockey league which operates in Canada and the United States. Since its inception in 1917–18, 321 players have played at least 1,000 regular season games, varying in amounts between Gordie Howe's 1,767 to Bernie Federko's 1,000. Of these players, a number have been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Thirty-one of the listed players have played for only one franchise. Four of those players played exclusively for the Montreal Canadiens and five played for the Detroit Red Wings, those teams having the most such players. The record for most teams played for by a player who has competed in over 1,000 games is held by Mike Sillinger, who played for 12 teams in his career; Sillinger played his 1,000th game with his 12th and final NHL team, the New York Islanders. Patrick Roy, Martin Brodeur and Roberto Luongo are the only goaltenders with at least 1,000 games played. Roy spent his career with the Montreal Canadiens and the Colorado Avalanche while Brodeur played for the New Jersey Devils and his final seven games with the St. Louis Blues. Luongo played for the New York Islanders, Florida Panthers and Vancouver Canucks in his career. The first goaltender was Patrick Roy, playing in his 1000th game in the 2002–03 season.

Only 18 players have played in over 1,500 games; of those, 14 have been inducted into the Hall of Fame and three more are not yet eligible for induction. Three of those 18 (Nicklas Lidstrom, Alex Delvecchio and Steve Yzerman) played their entire careers with Detroit; Shane Doan, of the Winnipeg/Phoenix/Arizona franchise, is the only player to play over 1,500 games with a single franchise other than Detroit. In addition, eight of the 18 spent at least some portion of their career with the Red Wings, also more than any other team. Lidstrom's 1,564 games is the most for any player in a career spent with only one franchise. The record for most teams played for by a player who has competed in over 1,500 games is held by Jaromir Jagr, who has played for nine teams in his career. Jagr played his 1,500th game with New Jersey, his seventh NHL team. No goaltender has ever played in 1,500 games.

Due to the much greater number of teams, the greater salaries paid to today's players, and the greater number of games played in a season, the list is dominated by post-expansion players. No NHL player surpassed 1,000 games before Gordie Howe on November 26, 1961, against the Chicago Black Hawks. Only 17 players in the top 100 started their careers before the expansion era, and only two players—Red Kelly and Bill Gadsby—played in more than 1,000 games and finished their careers before the expansion era.

List of Pittsburgh Steelers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League.

List of foreign NBA players

In the National Basketball Association, players born outside of the United States are often known as international players. Players who were born in U.S. overseas territories, such as Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam, are considered international players even if they are U.S. citizens. In some borderline cases, the NBA takes into consideration whether a player desires to be identified as international.Hank Biasatti, who was born in Italy and raised in Canada, was the first international player in the league in 1946. The number of international players in the league rose after the formation of the Dream Team when NBA players were allowed into Olympic play starting in 1992. Global interest in basketball subsequently soared. On opening day of the 1991–92 season, NBA rosters included 23 international players from 18 countries. At the start of the 2016–17 season, there was a record-high 113 international players from 41 countries and territories. In the start of the 2017–18 season, there were 108 international players from a record-high 42 countries and territories, including five players signed up through the newly implemented two-way contract.The number of players on opening-night rosters broke an all-time league record first set in 2010–11 and tied in 2012–13, and the number of countries represented surpassed the record set in 2010–11. In addition, the San Antonio Spurs set an all-time record for international players on an opening-night squad, with 10 during the 2013-14 season.This list includes all international players who have played in the NBA and also includes all players who were born in the United States but have represented other countries in international basketball competition. Players listed under the United States were born outside of the country but have represented them in international basketball tournament. Players who were born outside the United States to American parents and players who became naturalized U.S. citizens are also included in that section.

NC State Wolfpack football

The NC State Wolfpack football team represents North Carolina State University in the sport of American football. The Wolfpack competes in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Prior to joining the ACC in 1953, the Wolfpack were a member of the Southern Conference. As a founding member of the ACC, the Wolfpack has won seven conference championships and participated in 31 bowl games, of which the team has won 17, including eight of their last eleven. NC State is currently coached by Dave Doeren.

Since 1966, the Wolfpack has played its home games at Carter–Finley Stadium. On September 16, 2010, NC State restored the tradition of having a live mascot on the field. A wolf-like Tamaskan Dog named

“Tuffy” was on the sidelines for the Cincinnati game that day in Raleigh and Tuffy has not missed a Wolfpack football game in Carter–Finley Stadium since That day.

Navy Midshipmen football

The Navy Midshipmen football team represents the United States Naval Academy in NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) college football. The Naval Academy completed its final season as an FBS independent school (not in a conference) in 2014, and became a single-sport member of the American Athletic Conference beginning in the 2015 season. The team has been coached by Ken Niumatalolo since December 2007. Navy has 19 players and three coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame and won the college football national championship in 1926 according to the Boand and Houlgate poll systems. The 1910 team also was undefeated and unscored upon (the lone tie was a 0–0 game). The mascot is Bill the Goat.

The three major service academies—Air Force, Army, and Navy—compete for the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy, which is awarded to the academy that defeats the others in football that year (or retained by the previous winner in the event of a three-way tie).

North Carolina Tar Heels football

The North Carolina Tar Heels football team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the sport of American football. The Tar Heels have played in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Being the oldest public university and oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school is nicknamed "Carolina" in athletics. The program's title in football is "Carolina Football".North Carolina has played in 31 bowl games in its history and won three Southern Conference championships and five Atlantic Coast Conference titles. Thirty Tar Heel players have been honored as first-team All-Americas on 38 occasions. Carolina had 32 All-Southern Conference selections when it played in that league until 1952 and since joining the ACC in 1953, has had 174 first-team All-ACC choices. Since joining the Atlantic Coast Conference in 1953, the team has won five conference championships, with the most recent title coming in 1980.

One very important contribution to the game of football by Carolina is the modern use of the forward pass; they were the first college team to use the play in 1895. Bob Quincy notes in his 1973 book They Made the Bell Tower Chime:

"John Heisman, a noted historian, wrote 30 years later that, indeed, the Tar Heels had given birth to the forward pass against the Bulldogs (UGA). It was conceived to break a scoreless deadlock and give UNC a 6–0 win. The Tar Heels were in a punting situation and a Georgia rush seemed destined to block the ball. The punter, with an impromptu dash to his right, tossed the ball and it was caught by George Stephens, who ran 70 yards for a touchdown."

The program has long been overshadowed by the school's powerhouse men's basketball team. While not a consistent football powerhouse, the Carolina football program has had intermittent success and has featured a number of great players, many of whom have gone on to prominence in the National Football League, including Lawrence Taylor, Charlie Justice, Chris Hanburger, Ken Willard, Don McCauley, William Fuller, Harris Barton, Jeff Saturday, Alge Crumpler, Willie Parker, Greg Ellis, Dré Bly, Julius Peppers and Hakeem Nicks.

Rutgers Scarlet Knights football

The Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represents Rutgers University in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA). Rutgers competes as a member of the East Division of the Big Ten Conference. Prior to joining the Big Ten, the team was a member of the American Athletic Conference (formerly the Big East Conference) from 1991 to 2013. Rutgers plays its home games at High Point Solutions Stadium, in Piscataway, New Jersey. The team is currently led by head coach Chris Ash.

The Rutgers football team is notable for playing in what is considered to be the first ever intercollegiate football game in 1869, in which they defeated Princeton University by a score of 6–4. For this reason, Rutgers has been described as "the birthplace of college football."

World Series Most Valuable Player Award

The Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award is given to the player deemed to have the most impact on his team's performance in the World Series, which is the final round of the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason. The award was first presented in 1955 as the SPORT Magazine Award, but is now decided during the final game of the Series by a committee of reporters and officials present at the game. On September 29, 2017, it was renamed in honor of Willie Mays in remembrance of the 63rd anniversary of The Catch. Mays never won the award himself.

Pitchers have been named Series MVP twenty-seven times; four of them were relief pitchers. Twelve of the first fourteen World Series MVPs were won by pitchers; from 1969 until 1986, the proportion of pitcher MVPs declined—Rollie Fingers (1974) and Bret Saberhagen (1985) were the only two pitchers to win the award in this period. From 1987 until 1991, all of the World Series MVPs were pitchers, and, since 1995, pitchers have won the award nine times. Bobby Richardson of the 1960 New York Yankees is the only player in World Series history to be named MVP despite being on the losing team.

The most recent winner was Steve Pearce of the Boston Red Sox, who won the award in 2018.

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