Sporting News Manager of the Year Award

The Sporting News Manager of the Year Award was established in 1936 by The Sporting News and was given annually to one manager in Major League Baseball. In 1986 it was expanded to honor one manager from each league.

Winners

Key

Hall of Fame Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Listed below in chronological order are the MLB managers chosen as recipients of the TSN Manager of the Year Award.

1936–1985

Year Winner Team League
1936 Joe McCarthy (1) New York Yankees American League  
1937 Bill McKechnie (1) Boston Braves National League
1938 Joe McCarthy (2) New York Yankees American League
1939 Leo Durocher (1) Brooklyn Dodgers National League
1940 Bill McKechnie (2) Cincinnati Reds National League
1941 Billy Southworth (1) St. Louis Cardinals National League
1942 Billy Southworth (2) St. Louis Cardinals National League
1943 Joe McCarthy (3) New York Yankees American League
1944 Luke Sewell St. Louis Browns American League
1945 Ossie Bluege Washington Senators   American League
1946 Eddie Dyer St. Louis Cardinals National League
1947 Bucky Harris New York Yankees American League
1948 Billy Meyer Pittsburgh Pirates National League
1949 Casey Stengel (1) New York Yankees American League
1950 Red Rolfe Detroit Tigers American League
1951 Leo Durocher (2) New York Giants National League
1952 Eddie Stanky St. Louis Cardinals National League
1953 Casey Stengel (2) New York Yankees American League
1954 Leo Durocher (3) New York Giants National League
1955 Walter Alston (1) Brooklyn Dodgers National League
1956 Birdie Tebbetts Cincinnati Reds National League
1957 Fred Hutchinson St. Louis Cardinals National League
1958 Casey Stengel (3) New York Yankees American League
1959 Walter Alston (2) Los Angeles Dodgers National League
1960 Danny Murtaugh (1) Pittsburgh Pirates National League
1961 Ralph Houk New York Yankees American League
1962 Bill Rigney Los Angeles Angels American League
1963 Walter Alston (3) Los Angeles Dodgers National League
1964 Johnny Keane St. Louis Cardinals National League
1965 Sam Mele Minnesota Twins American League
1966 Hank Bauer Baltimore Orioles American League
1967 Dick Williams Boston Red Sox American League
1968 Mayo Smith Detroit Tigers American League
1969 Gil Hodges New York Mets National League
1970 Danny Murtaugh (2) Pittsburgh Pirates National League
1971 Charlie Fox San Francisco Giants National League
1972 Chuck Tanner Chicago White Sox American League
1973 Gene Mauch Montreal Expos National League
1974 Bill Virdon (1) New York Yankees American League
1975 Darrell Johnson Boston Red Sox American League
1976 Danny Ozark Philadelphia Phillies National League
1977 Earl Weaver (1) Baltimore Orioles American League
1978 George Bamberger   Milwaukee Brewers American League
1979 Earl Weaver (2) Baltimore Orioles American League
1980 Bill Virdon (2) Houston Astros National League
1981 Billy Martin Oakland Athletics American League
1982 Whitey Herzog St. Louis Cardinals National League
1983 Tony La Russa (1) Chicago White Sox American League
1984 Jim Frey Chicago Cubs National League
1985 Bobby Cox (1) Toronto Blue Jays American League

1986–present

Year American League winner Team National League winner Team Ref
1986 John McNamara Boston Red Sox Hal Lanier Houston Astros
1987 Sparky Anderson Detroit Tigers Buck Rodgers Montreal Expos
1988 Tony La Russa (2) Oakland Athletics Jim Leyland (1) Pittsburgh Pirates
1989 Frank Robinson Baltimore Orioles Don Zimmer Chicago Cubs
1990 Jeff Torborg Chicago White Sox Jim Leyland (2) Pittsburgh Pirates
1991 Tom Kelly Minnesota Twins Bobby Cox (2) Atlanta Braves
1992 Tony La Russa (3) Oakland Athletics Jim Leyland (3) Pittsburgh Pirates
1993 Johnny Oates (1) Baltimore Orioles Bobby Cox (3) Atlanta Braves
1994 Buck Showalter (1) New York Yankees Felipe Alou Montreal Expos
1995 Mike Hargrove Cleveland Indians Don Baylor Colorado Rockies
1996 Johnny Oates (2) Texas Rangers Bruce Bochy (1) San Diego Padres
1997 Davey Johnson (1) Baltimore Orioles Dusty Baker (1) San Francisco Giants
1998 Joe Torre New York Yankees Bruce Bochy (2) San Diego Padres
1999 Jimy Williams Boston Red Sox Bobby Cox (4) Atlanta Braves
2000 Jerry Manuel Chicago White Sox Dusty Baker (2) San Francisco Giants
2001 Lou Piniella Seattle Mariners Larry Bowa Philadelphia Phillies
2002 Mike Scioscia (1) Anaheim Angels Bobby Cox (5) Atlanta Braves
2003 Tony Peña Kansas City Royals   Bobby Cox (6) Atlanta Braves
2004 Ron Gardenhire (1)
Buck Showalter (2)
Minnesota Twins
Texas Rangers
Bobby Cox (7) Atlanta Braves
2005 Ozzie Guillén Chicago White Sox Bobby Cox (8) Atlanta Braves
2006 Jim Leyland (4) Detroit Tigers Joe Girardi Florida Marlins
2007 Eric Wedge Cleveland Indians Bob Melvin Arizona Diamondbacks  
2008 Joe Maddon (1) Tampa Bay Rays Fredi González Florida Marlins
2009 Mike Scioscia (2) Los Angeles Angels Jim Tracy Colorado Rockies
2010 Ron Gardenhire (2) Minnesota Twins Bud Black San Diego Padres
2011 Joe Maddon (2) Tampa Bay Rays Kirk Gibson Arizona Diamondbacks
2012 Buck Showalter (3) Baltimore Orioles Davey Johnson (2) Washington Nationals
2013 John Farrell Boston Red Sox Clint Hurdle Pittsburgh Pirates [1]
2014 Mike Scioscia (3) Los Angeles Angels Matt Williams Washington Nationals [2]
2015 Paul Molitor Minnesota Twins Terry Collins New York Mets [3]
2016 Terry Francona Cleveland Indians Dave Roberts Los Angeles Dodgers [4]
2017 Terry Francona (2) Cleveland Indians Craig Counsell (1) Milwaukee Brewers [5]
2018 Bob Melvin Oakland Athletics Craig Counsell (2)
Brian Snitker
Milwaukee Brewers
Atlanta Braves
[6][7]

References

  1. ^ http://www.sportingnews.com/mlb/story/2013-10-22/al-manager-of-the-year-john-farrell-red-sox-nl-clint-hurdle-pirates
  2. ^ http://www.sportingnews.com/mlb/story/2014-10-21/mlb-awards-2014-manager-of-the-year-mike-scioscia-matt-williams?eadid=SOC/Twi/SNMain
  3. ^ http://www.sportingnews.com/mlb-news/4659373-mlb-awards-2015-manager-of-the-year-terry-collins-paul-molitor
  4. ^ http://www.sportingnews.com/mlb/news/mlb-awards-2016-manager-of-the-year-terry-francona-dave-roberts/12fe28h6ri1d51f5xu5ma26l3a
  5. ^ http://www.sportingnews.com/ca/mlb/news/terry-francona-craig-counsell-manager-of-the-year-indians-brewers-sporting-news-mlb-awards/1tjdurvgq90cf1c5id91n0thma
  6. ^ "Athletics' Bob Melvin voted Sporting News 2018 AL Manager of the Year".
  7. ^ "Craig Counsell, Brian Snitker voted Sporting News NL Co-Managers of the Year".

Sources

See also

1936 Major League Baseball season

The 1936 Major League Baseball season.

1937 Major League Baseball season

The 1937 Major League Baseball season.

1938 Major League Baseball season

The 1938 Major League Baseball season.

1940 Major League Baseball season

The 1940 Major League Baseball season.

1941 Major League Baseball season

The 1941 Major League Baseball season included the New York Yankees defeating the Brooklyn Dodgers in the World Series, Ted Williams batting .406, and Joe DiMaggio having a 56-game hitting streak; it has been called the "best baseball season ever".

1942 Major League Baseball season

The 1942 Major League Baseball season saw the St. Louis Cardinals defeat the New York Yankees in the World Series.

1943 Major League Baseball season

The 1943 Major League Baseball season, saw the New York Yankees defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1943 World Series.

In order to conserve rail transport during World War II, the 1943 Spring training was limited to an area east of the Mississippi River and north of the Ohio River. The Chicago White Sox held camp in French Lick, Indiana, the Washington Senators in College Park, Maryland, and the New York Yankees in Asbury Park, New Jersey.

1944 Major League Baseball season

The 1944 Major League Baseball season saw the Cardinals win the World Series four games to two over the Browns in an all-St. Louis Fall Classic.

1946 Major League Baseball season

The 1946 Major League Baseball season. Due to the end of World War II many drafted ballplayers returned to the majors and the quality of play greatly improved.

1948 Major League Baseball season

During the 1948 Major League Baseball season which began on April 19 and ended on October 11, 1948, the Boston Braves won the NL pennant and the Cleveland Indians won a 1-game playoff against the Boston Red Sox to take the AL pennant.

1950 Major League Baseball season

The 1950 Major League Baseball season began on April 18 and ended with the 1950 World Series on October 7, 1950. The only no-hitter of the season was pitched by Vern Bickford on August 11, in the Boston Braves 7–0 victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers. The 1950 season saw the first use of a bullpen car, by the Cleveland Indians.

1952 Major League Baseball season

The 1952 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 15 to October 7, 1952. The Braves were playing their final season in Boston, before the team relocated to Milwaukee the following year, thus, ending fifty seasons without any MLB team relocating.

1953 Major League Baseball season

The 1953 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 13 to October 12, 1953. It marked the first relocation of an MLB franchise in fifty years, as the Boston Braves moved their NL franchise to Milwaukee, where they would play their home games at the new County Stadium.

1954 Major League Baseball season

The 1954 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 13 to October 2, 1954. For the second consecutive season, an MLB franchise relocated, as the St. Louis Browns moved to Baltimore and became the Baltimore Orioles, who played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

Bill Virdon

William Charles Virdon (born June 9, 1931) is an American former professional baseball outfielder, manager, and coach in Major League Baseball (MLB). Virdon played in MLB for the St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1955 through 1965 and in 1968. He served as a coach for the Pirates and Houston Astros, and managed the Pirates, Astros, New York Yankees, and Montreal Expos.

After playing in Minor League Baseball for the Yankees organization, Virdon was traded to the Cardinals, and he made his MLB debut in 1955. That year, Virdon won the National League Rookie of the Year Award. He slumped at the beginning of the 1956 season, and was traded to the Pirates, where he spent the remainder of his playing career. A premier defensive outfielder during his playing days as a center fielder for the Cardinals and Pirates, Virdon led a strong defensive team to the 1960 World Series championship. In 1962, Virdon won a Rawlings Gold Glove Award. Following the 1965 season, he retired due to his desire to become a manager.

Virdon managed in Minor League Baseball until returning to the Pirates as a coach in 1968. He served as manager of the Pirates in 1972 and 1973, before becoming the manager of the Yankees in 1974. During the 1975 season, the Yankees fired Virdon, and he was hired by the Astros. After being fired by the Astros after the 1982 season, Virdon managed the Expos in 1983 and 1984. Virdon won The Sporting News' Manager of the Year Award in 1974, his only full season working for the Yankees, and in 1980, while managing the Astros. He returned to the Pirates as a coach following his managerial career, and remains with the Pirates as a guest instructor during spring training.

List of Boston Red Sox award winners

This is a list of award winners and single-season leaderboards for the Boston Red Sox professional baseball team.

List of St. Louis Cardinals managers

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). Prior to entering the NL in 1892, they were also a member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. They have won 11 World Series titles as an NL team, one pre-World Series championship and tied another against the NL. Since 1900, the team has been known as the Cardinals. They were originally named the Perfectos. Baseball teams like St. Louis employ a manager to make on-field decisions for the team during the game, similar to the head coach position of other sports. A number of coaches report to the manager, including the bench coach, first and third base coaches, and pitching and hitting coaches, among other coaches and instructors. Mike Matheny, a former catcher for the Cardinals from 2000 to 2004, was the manager from 2012-2018, when he was relieved following a series of disputes, including allegations that he would not speak with Dexter Fowler. He was signed through 2017 and extended to the 2018 season when he was fired. The Cardinals hired bench coach Mike Shildt as interim manager.Matheny is one of 63 total individuals who have managed the Cardinals, more than any other Major League franchise. Between 1882 and 1918 – 37 total seasons – 37 different managers stayed the helm. Ned Cuthbert became the first manager of the then-Brown Stockings in 1882, serving for one season. Also an outfielder for a former St. Louis Brown Stockings club, he was directly responsible for bringing professional baseball back to St. Louis after a game-fixing scandal expelled the earlier team from the NL in 1877. He rallied a barnstorming team that attracted the attention of eventual owner Chris von der Ahe, who directly negotiated for the team to be a charter member of a new league, the AA, in 1882. Charles Comiskey was the first manager in franchise history to hold the position for multiple seasons. He also owns the highest career winning percentage in franchise history at .673, four American Association pennants (1885–1888) and one interleague championship (before the official World Series existed). He also held the record for most career wins in team history with from 1884 to 1945 (563 total) and games managed (852) until 1924. However, von der Ahe changed managers more than any other owner in team history – a total of 27 in 19 season oversaw the team on the field. After the Robison era began, stability marginally improved: nine managers in 20 years from 1899 to 1918. Jack McCloskey, Roger Bresnahan, and Miller Huggins each managed three or more seasons from 1906 to 1917, becoming the first group to manage multiple seasons in succession.

Branch Rickey, known mainly as a general manager, surpassed Comiskey's record for games managed in 1924, totaling 947 in seven seasons. His replacement, Rogers Hornsby – also the second baseman who won two Triple Crowns and six consecutive batting titles – finally guided the Cardinals to their first modern World Series championship against the formidable New York Yankees, their first interleague championship in exactly 40 years. Sam Breadon, the Cardinals' owner, also frequently changed managers (although Frankie Frisch and Gabby Street both managed at least five seasons and won one World Series title apiece in the 1930s out of nine total managers in 30 seasons) until settling on Hall of Famer Billy Southworth from 1940 to 1945.

Southworth set new team records for games managed (981), wins (620) and World Series championships (two). His Cardinals teams won 105 or more games each year from 1942 to 1944, winning the NL pennants in each of those three seasons. His .642 winning percentage is second-highest in team history, and the highest since the Cardinals joined the National League. Southworth was also awarded the Sporting News Manager of the Year Award in 1941 and 1942. Starting in 1953 with the Gussie Busch/Anheuser-Busch era, thirteen managers captained the club in 43 seasons. After Southworth, Eddie Dyer, Eddie Stanky, Fred Hutchinson and Johnny Keane also each took home a Sporting News Manager of the Year award. Keane's 1964 team that year's World Series. Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst took over from 1965 to 1977 and won one World Series and two NL pennants. Schoendienst then broke Southworth's team records for games (1,999 total) and wins (1,041). He also held records of 14 seasons managed and 955 losses.

In the 1980s, Hall of Famer Whitey Herzog's style of play known as Whiteyball pushed the Cardinals to three NL pennants and a World Series championship in 1982. He was named the Sporting News Sportsman of the Year and Manager of the Year in 1982. In 1990, Joe Torre took over and Tony La Russa succeeded him when the William DeWitt, Jr. ownership – still the current ownership – commenced in 1996. La Russa finished with the longest tenure in franchise history (16 seasons), and leads Cardinals managers in wins (1,408), losses (1,182), playoff appearances (nine) and is tied for most World Series championships (two). He also won three NL pennants. Matheny took over from La Russa. With DeWitt ‘s era, the Cardinals have seen their greatest period of managerial stability with just two managers.

Besides La Russa, eight Cardinals managers have won a modern World Series: Hornsby, Frisch, Street, Dyer, Southworth, Keane, Schoendienst and Herzog; Southworth and La Russa are the only ones to win two each. Comiskey won one pre-World Series title and tied for another. Cardinals managers inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame include Comiskey, Tommy McCarthy, Roger Connor, Kid Nichols, Bresnahan, Huggins, Rickey, Hornsby, Bill McKechnie, Southworth, Frisch, Schoendienst, Herzog, Torre and La Russa.

Los Angeles Angels award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Los Angeles Angels professional baseball team.

Manager (baseball)

In baseball, the field manager (commonly referred to as the manager) is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction. Managers are typically assisted by a staff of assistant coaches whose responsibilities are specialized. Field managers are typically not involved in off-field personnel decisions or long-term club planning, responsibilities that are instead held by a team's general manager.

Sporting News Manager of the Year Award

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