Spain women's national football team

The Spain women's national football team (Spanish: Selección Española de Fútbol Femenina) represents Spain in international women's football since 1980, and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Spain have qualified two times for the FIFA Women's World Cup and three times for the UEFA Women's Championship, reaching the semifinals in 1997. Spain's youth teams are one of the most successful and have enjoyed a great success in 2018, getting the two continental titles (U-17 and U-19), and reaching the two worldwide finals, winners in the U-17 World Cup and runners-up in the U-20 World Cup.

Spain
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Roja (The Red [One])[1]
AssociationRoyal Spanish Football Federation
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachJorge Vilda
CaptainMarta Torrejón
Most capsMarta Torrejón (88)
Top scorerVerónica Boquete (38)
FIFA codeESP
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 13 Steady (12 July 2019)[2]
Highest12 (March–December 2018)
Lowest21 (June–August 2004, March 2008)
First international
Unofficial
 Spain 3–3 Portugal 
(Murcia, Spain; 21 February 1971)
Official
 Spain 0–1 Portugal 
(A Guarda, Spain; 5 February 1983)
Biggest win
 Spain 17–0 Slovenia 
(Palamós, Spain; 20 March 1994)
Biggest defeat
 Spain 0–8 Sweden 
(Gandía, Spain; 2 June 1996)
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2015)
Best resultRound of 16 (2019)
European Championship
Appearances3 (first in 1997)
Best resultSemi-finals (1997)

History

Early years

After underground women's football clubs started appearing in Spain around 1970 one of its instigators, Rafael Muga, decided to create a national team. It was an unofficial project as football was considered an unsuitable sport for women by both the Royal Spanish Football Federation and National Movement's Women's Section, which organized women's sports in Francoist Spain. When asked about the initiative in January 1971 RFEF president José Luis Pérez Payá answered I'm not against women's football, but I don't like it either. I don't think it's feminine from a esthetic point of view. Women are not favored wearing shirt and trousers. Any regional dress would fit them better.[3]

One month later, on 21 February 1971, the unofficial Spanish national team, including Conchi Sánchez, who played professionally in the Italian league, made its debut in Murcia's La Condomina against Portugal, ending in a 3–3 draw. The team wasn't allowed to wear RFEF's crest and the referee couldn't wear an official uniform either. On 15 July, with a 5-days delay for transfer issues, it played its first game abroad against Italy in Turin's Stadio Comunale, suffering an 8–1 defeat. It was then invited to the 2nd edition of unofficial women's world cup (Mundialito 1981), but RFEF forbid them to take part in the competition.[4] Despite these conditions Spain was entrusted hosting the 1972 World Cup. RFEF vetoed the project, and the competition was cancelled and disbanded. The unofficial Spanish team itself broke up shortly after.

1980s: Officiality of the team

After the transition to democracy in the second half of the decade RFEF finally accepted women's football in November 1980, creating first a national cup and next a national team, which finally made its debut under coach Teodoro Nieto on 5 February 1983 in A Guarda, Pontevedra. The opponent was again Portugal, which defeated Spain 0–1. The team subsequently played 2-leg friendlies against France and Switzerland drawing with both opponents in Aranjuez and Barcelona and losing in Perpignan before it finally clinched its first victory in Zürich (0–1).[5] On 27 April 1985 it played its first official match in the 1987 European Championship's qualification, losing 1–0 against Hungary. After losing the first four matches Spain defeated Switzerland and drew with Italy to end third. The team also ended in its group's bottom positions in the subsequent 1989 and 1991 qualifiers. After the former Nieto was replaced by Ignacio Quereda, who has coached the team since 1 September 1988. Teodoro Nieto left the most International Footballer Conchi sanchez (Amancio) out of the Spanish Team even when the player was the first Capitain during the 70s, She was playing in Italy at the time winning championships and Italian Cups, there was not substantial reasons to leave such extraordinary player out at the peak of her career, the damaged was done to such brilliant player who loved to play for her country and fully deserved more respect and recognition.

1990s and 2000s: Growing up

The 1995 Euro qualifying marked an improvement as Spain ended 2nd, one point from England, which qualified for the final tournament. In these qualifiers Spain attained its biggest victory to date, a 17–0 over Slovenia. In the 1997 Euro qualifying it made a weaker performance, including a record 0–8 loss against Sweden in Gandia, but the European Championship was expanded to eight teams and Spain still made it to the repechage, where it defeated England on a 3–2 aggregate to qualify for the competition for the first time. In the first stage the team drew 1–1 against France, lost 0–1 against host Sweden, and beat 1–0 Russia to qualify on goal average over France to the semifinals, where it was defeated 2–1 by Italy. All three goals were scored by Ángeles Parejo.

This success was followed by a long series of unsuccessful qualifiers. In the 1999 World Cup's qualifying Spain ended last for the first time, not winning a single game. In the 2001 Euro's it made it to the repechage, where it suffered a 3–10 aggregate defeat against Denmark. In the 2003 World Cup's it again ended last despite starting with a 6–1 win over Iceland. In the 2005 Euro's, where a 9–1 win over Belgium was followed by a 5-game non scoring streak, it ended 3rd behind Denmark and Norway. In the 2007 World Cup's the team again ended 3rd behind Denmark and Finland despite earning 7 more points.

In the 2009 Euro's Spain made its better performance since the 1995 qualifiers, narrowly missing qualification as England clinched the top position by overcoming a 2–0 in the final match's second half. Spain had to play the repechage, where it lost both games against the Netherlands. In the 2011 World Cup's Spain again ended 2nd, with no repechage, after England again overcame a half-time 2–0 in their second confrontation.[6]

2010s: First World Cup

Spain achieved 16 years later a place for the final stage of a European Championship. The team qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, after beating Scotland in the qualifiers playoff. In the group stage, a win over England and a draw against Russia was enough to qualify for the quarterfinals, where it was eliminated by Norway.

Two years later, Spain qualified for the first time ever to a World Cup, winning nine of its ten matches of the qualifying round. In the group stage of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. Their campaign, however, ended up being a disaster. Spain managed only a 1–1 draw into the weakest team in the group, Costa Rica, before losing 0–1 to Brazil. In the last match with South Korea, they still lost 1–2 after an initial lead, becoming the worst European team in the tournament. After the World Cup, the 23 players on the roster issued a collective statement for the end of Ignacio Quereda’s reign as head coach.[7] Later that summer, Quereda stepped down and was replaced by Jorge Vilda, who had previously coached the U-19 team, and was on the shortlist for the 2014 FIFA World Coach of the Year.[8][9]

Spain has achieved to qualify for the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 by winning all the matches and ahead in 11 points to the second classified. In 2017 the national team participated for the first time in the Algarve Cup winning the tournament.[10] However, its performance in the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 was very disappointing: only one match won (against Portugal, the worst ranked team in Euro), two defeats against England (0–2) and Scotland (0–1) in group stage, Miraculously Spain advanted to the quarter-finals, where losing against Austria in a quarter-final finishing 0–0 after extra time, then 3–5 in penalty shoot-out. Eventually, the national football team was eliminated after more than 345 minutes without scoring a single goal.

At the 2019 Women's World Cup, Spain were in Group B with China PR, South Africa, and Germany. They finished second in the group to progress to the knockout stage of a World Cup for the first time in their history.[11]

Competitive record

World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D * L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
China 1991 Did not qualify 1991 UEFA Women's Championship
Sweden 1995 UEFA Women's Euro 1995
United States 1999 6 0 2 4 5 10
United States 2003 6 2 0 4 8 11
China 2007 8 4 2 2 19 14
Germany 2011 8 6 1 1 37 4
Canada 2015 Group Stage 20th 3 0 1 2 2 4 10 9 1 0 42 2
France 2019 Round of 16 4 1 1 2 4 4 8 8 0 0 25 2
Total 2/8 0 Titles 7 1 2 4 6 8 45 28 6 11 134 43

European Championship

UEFA Women's Championship record UEFA Euro Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1984 Did not enter Declined Participation
Norway 1987 Did not qualify 6 1 1 4 7 9
West Germany 1989 8 2 2 4 4 8
Denmark 1991 6 0 2 4 3 13
Italy 1993 4 1 1 2 2 6
EnglandGermanyNorwaySweden1995 6 3 3 0 29 0
NorwaySweden 1997 Semi-Finals 4th 4 1 1 2 3 4 6 1 2 3 8 15
Germany 2001 Did not qualify 6 1 1 4 6 17
England 2005 8 2 1 5 10 10
Finland 2009 8 5 2 1 24 7
Sweden 2013 Quarter-Finals 7th 4 1 1 2 5 7 10 6 2 2 43 14
Netherlands 2017 Quarter-Finals 8th 4 1 1 2 2 3 8 8 0 0 40 2
England 2021 TBD 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 3/12 12 3 3 6 10 14 76 30 17 29 193 101

Olympic Games

Year Round Position MP W D L GF GA
United StatesAtlanta 1996 Did not qualify
AustraliaSydney 2000
Greece 2004
ChinaBeijing 2008
United KingdomLondon 2012
BrazilRio de Janeiro (state) 2016
JapanTokyo 2020
FranceParis 2024 To be determined
United StatesLos Angeles 2028
Total 0/6

Team

Current squad

The following players were called to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

Caps and goals as of 25 June 2019.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
Goalkeeper
1 GK Dolores Gallardo 10 June 1993 (age 26) 30 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
13 GK Sandra Paños 4 November 1992 (age 26) 33 0 Spain Barcelona
23 GK María Asunción Quiñones 29 October 1996 (age 22) 3 0 Spain Real Sociedad
Defender
2 DF Celia Jiménez 20 June 1995 (age 24) 24 0 United States Reign FC
3 DF Leila Ouahabi 22 March 1993 (age 26) 29 1 Spain Barcelona
4 DF Irene Paredes 4 July 1991 (age 28) 67 8 France Paris Saint-Germain
5 DF Ivana Andrés 13 July 1994 (age 25) 22 0 Spain Levante
8 DF Marta Torrejón (c) 27 February 1990 (age 29) 88 9 Spain Barcelona
16 DF María Pilar León 13 June 1995 (age 24) 28 0 Spain Barcelona
20 DF Andrea Pereira 19 September 1993 (age 25) 26 0 Spain Barcelona
Midfielder
6 MF Victoria Losada 5 March 1991 (age 28) 64 13 Spain Barcelona
7 MF Marta Corredera 8 August 1991 (age 27) 72 5 Spain Levante
11 MF Alexia Putellas 4 February 1994 (age 25) 70 13 Spain Barcelona
12 MF Patricia Guijarro 17 May 1998 (age 21) 21 3 Spain Barcelona
14 MF Virginia Torrecilla 4 September 1994 (age 24) 59 6 France Montpellier
15 MF Silvia Meseguer 12 March 1989 (age 30) 67 5 Spain Atlético Madrid
18 MF Aitana Bonmatí 18 January 1998 (age 21) 15 1 Spain Barcelona
19 MF Amanda Sampedro 26 June 1993 (age 26) 48 11 Spain Atlético Madrid
21 MF Andrea Falcón 28 February 1997 (age 22) 10 1 Spain Barcelona
Forward
9 FW Mariona Caldentey 19 March 1996 (age 23) 25 2 Spain Barcelona
10 FW Jennifer Hermoso 9 May 1990 (age 29) 72 31 Spain Barcelona
17 FW Lucía García 14 July 1998 (age 21) 18 1 Spain Athletic Bilbao
22 FW Nahikari García 10 March 1997 (age 22) 13 1 Spain Real Sociedad

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Catalina Coll 23 April 2001 (age 18) 0 0 Spain Barcelona v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019 PRE
GK Sara Serrat 10 September 1995 (age 23) 1 0 Spain Sporting Huelva v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
GK Ana Vallés 15 August 1997 (age 21) 0 0 Spain Rayo Vallecano v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019 PRE

DF Laia Aleixandri 25 August 2000 (age 18) 1 1 Spain Atlético Madrid v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
DF Eunate Arraiza 3 June 1991 (age 28) 5 0 Spain Athletic Bilbao v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
DF Ona Batlle 10 June 1999 (age 20) 2 0 Spain Levante v.  Canada; 24 May 2019
DF Marta Carro Cruz Roja.svg 6 January 1991 (age 28) 7 1 Spain Valencia v.  Poland; 1 March 2019
DF Rocío Gálvez 15 May 1997 (age 22) 3 0 Spain Levante v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
DF Carmen Menayo 14 April 1998 (age 21) 0 0 Spain Atlético Madrid Training camp; October 2018
DF Núria Mendoza 15 December 1995 (age 23) 0 0 Spain Real Sociedad Training camp; October 2018
DF Paula Nicart 8 September 1994 (age 24) 3 0 Spain Valencia Training camp; October 2018
DF Lucía Rodríguez 24 May 1999 (age 20) 0 0 Spain Real Sociedad v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019 PRE

MF Damaris Egurrola 26 August 1999 (age 19) 1 0 Spain Athletic Bilbao v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
MF Nerea Eizagirre 4 January 2000 (age 19) 0 0 Spain Real Sociedad v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019 PRE
MF Gemma Gili 21 May 1994 (age 25) 2 0 Spain Levante Training camp; October 2018
MF Irene Guerrero 12 December 1996 (age 22) 2 1 Spain Real Betis v.  Canada; 24 May 2019
MF Sandra Hernández 25 May 1997 (age 22) 6 1 Spain Valencia v.  Canada; 24 May 2019
MF Rosa Márquez 22 December 2000 (age 18) 0 0 Spain Real Betis v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019 PRE
MF Ángela Sosa 16 January 1993 (age 26) 3 0 Spain Atlético Madrid v.  England; 9 April 2019
MF Claudia Zornoza 20 October 1990 (age 28) 1 0 Spain Levante Training camp; October 2018

FW Olga García 1 June 1992 (age 27) 31 5 Spain Atlético Madrid v.  Canada; 24 May 2019
FW Sheila García 15 March 1997 (age 22) 1 0 Spain Rayo Vallecano v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
FW Lucía Gómez 11 October 1996 (age 22) 0 0 Spain Levante Training camp; October 2018
FW Esther González 8 December 1992 (age 26) 5 0 Spain Levante v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
FW Bárbara Latorre 14 March 1993 (age 26) 18 1 Spain Real Sociedad v.  England; 9 April 2019 PRE
FW Eva María Navarro 27 January 2001 (age 18) 1 0 Spain Levante v.  Cameroon; 17 May 2019
FW Alba Redondo 27 August 1996 (age 22) 6 2 Spain Levante v.  Canada; 24 May 2019

Previous squads

World Cup
European Football Championship
Others

Coaching staff

Position Name
Head coach Jorge Vilda
Assistant coach Montserrat Tomé
Goalkeeping coach Carlos Sánchez
Fitness coach Kenio Gonzalo
Video assistant Rubén Jimenez
Doctor Joan Molera
Psychologist Javier López Vallejo

List of Spain women's national football team managers

Manager From To Record
G W D L GF GA GD Win %[a]
Teodoro Nieto February 1983 July 1988 19 4 5 10 14 22 −8 34.21%
Ignacio Quereda August 1988 July 2015 141 54 36 51 302 202 +100 51.06%
Jorge Vilda August 2015 current 54 33 10 11 117 33 +84 69.44%
Total 214 91 51 72 434 258 +176 54.69%
  1. ^ A draw counts as a ½ win
  1. ^ A draw counts as a ½ win

Results and fixtures

For all past match results of the national team, see single-season articles and the team's results page

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the last year.

  Win   Draw   Loss

Date Venue Opponent Result Competition
31 August 2018 Spain Santander Finland  5–1 2019 World Cup qualifying
4 September 2018 Spain Logroño Serbia  3–0
8 November 2018 Spain Leganés Poland  3–1 Friendly
13 November 2018 Germany Erfurt Germany  0–0
17 January 2019 Spain Cartagena Belgium  1–1
22 January 2019 Spain Alicante United States  0–1
27 February 2019 Portugal Parchal Netherlands  2–0 2019 Algarve Cup
1 March 2019 Portugal Lagos Poland  0–3
6 March 2019 Portugal Albufeira Switzerland   2–0
5 April 2019 Spain Don Benito Brazil  2–1 Friendly
9 April 2019 United Kingdom Swindon England  2–1
17 May 2019 Spain Guadalajara Cameroon  4–0
24 May 2019 Spain Logroño Canada  0–0
2 June 2019 France Le Touquet Japan  1–1
8 June 2019 France Le Havre South Africa  3–1 2019 World Cup
12 June 2019 France Valenciennes Germany  0–1
17 June 2019 France Le Havre China PR  0–0
24 June 2019 France Reims United States  1–2

Overall official record

Honours

Titles

Med 1.png Champions: 2017
Med 1.png Champions: 2018

Other awards

Player statistics

Most caps

  • Still active national team players in bold.
Marta Torrejón
Marta Torrejón is the most capped player in the history of the Spanish national team.
# Player Career Caps Goals
1 Marta Torrejón 2007–0000 88 9
2 Marta Corredera 2013–0000 72 5
Jennifer Hermoso 2011–0000 72 31
4 Arantza del Puerto 1990–2005 71 ??
5 Alexia Putellas 2013–0000 70 13
6 Silvia Meseguer 2008–0000 67 5
Irene Paredes 2011–0000 67 8
8 Victoria Losada 2010–0000 64 13
9 Mar Prieto 1989–2000 62 27
10 Sonia Bermúdez 2005–2017 61 34

Most goals

  • Still active national team players in bold.
Vero Boquete Euro 2013b
Verónica Boquete is Spain's all-time scorer with 38 goals.
# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Verónica Boquete 2005–2017 38 56 0.679
2 Sonia Bermúdez 2005–2017 34 61 0.557
3 Adriana Martín 2005–2015 33 37 0.892
4 Jennifer Hermoso 2011–0000 30 71 0.423
5 Mar Prieto 1989–2000 27 62 0.435
6 María Paz Vilas 2008–2018 15 25 0.600

Hat-tricks

Adriana Martin
Adriana Martin has scored 4 hat-tricks with Spain in her career
Player Competition Against Home/Away Result Date
Mar Prieto7 1995 EURO Q Slovenia Slovenia Home 17–0 20 March 1994
Itziar Bakero
Laura del Río5 2005 EURO Q Belgium Belgium Home 7–0 29 February 2004
Adriana Martín5 2007 WC Q Poland Poland Home 7–0 30 March 2006
Adriana Martín4 2011 WC Q Malta Malta Away 0–13 19 September 2009
Sonia Bermúdez
Ana "Willy" Romero
Adriana Martín Turkey Turkey Away 0–5 21 November 2009
Adriana Martín4 Malta Malta Home 9–0 24 June 2010
Verónica Boquete 2013 EURO Q Turkey Turkey Away 1–10 17 September 2011
María Paz Vilas7 Kazakhstan Kazakhstan Home 14–0 5 April 2012
Natalia Pablos5 2015 WC Q North Macedonia Macedonia Home 12–0 13 February 2014
Sonia Bermúdez North Macedonia Macedonia Away 0–10 10 April 2014
Jennifer Hermoso
Sonia Bermúdez 5 2017 EURO Q Montenegro Montenegro Home 13–0 15 September 2016
Verónica Boquete4
Ainhoa Tirapu
Ainhoa Tirapu holds the Spanish record for most international career clean sheets

4 Player scored 4 goals
5 Player scored 5 goals
7 Player scored 7 goals

Clean sheets

  • Still active national team players in bold.
# Player Career Clean Sheets Caps Average
1 Ainhoa Tirapu 2007–2015 20 46 0.435
2 Dolores Gallardo 2012–0000 16 30 0.533
3 Sandra Paños 2011–0000 15 33 0.455
4 Roser Serra 1991–1998 10? 33 0.303?
5 Ana Ruiz 1984–1988 4 17 0.235
Elixabete Capa 1997–2005 4 ?? ??

Rankings

FIFA Women's World Rankings

Season March June Aug/Sep December
2003 19th (1767) 19th (1767) 20th (1767) 20th (1765)
2004 20th (1771) 21st (1756) 21st (1756) 20th (1756)
2005 20th (1754) 20th (1756) 20th (1756) 20th (1778)
2006 20th (1778) 20th (1793) 20th (1778) 20th (1778)
2007 20th (1778) 20th (1802) 20th (1802) 20th (1805)
2008 21st (1805) 19th (1819) 19th (1819) 20th (1796)
2009 20th (1796) 20th (1796) 20th (1797) 20th (1813)
2010 20th (1813) 20th (1812) 19th (1816) 19th (1816)
2011 18th (1816) 18th (1816) 18th (1819) 17th (1841)
2012 17th (1842) 16th (1841) 17th (1831) 18th (1823)
2013 18th (1824) 18th (1823) 17th (1831) 15th (1849)
2014 15th (1844) 16th (1854) 16th (1865) 15th (1865)
2015 14th (1867) 19th (1815) 18th (1824) 14th (1854)
2016 15th (1852) 14th (1861) 14th (1861) 14th (1862)
2017 13th (1885) 13th (1885) 17th (1849) 13th (1869)
2018 12th (1886) 12th (1911) 12th (1916) 12th (1920)
2019 13th (1913) 13th (1899)

UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Ranking

Date Rank Points
9 March 2011 12th 32,679
25 October 2012 12th 32,999
17 September 2014 7th 35,941
8 June 2016 6th 37,363[13]
21 September 2016 6th 37,655[14]
28 November 2017 5th 39,340[15]
13 June 2018 6th 39,139[16]
4 September 2018 5th 39,181[17]
8 July 2019 6th 22,335
Ziaian Women's Football Rankings[18]
Season 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003
Rank 15th 16th 16th 16th 28th 23rd 26th 24th
Season 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Rank 24th 24th 24th 24th 24th 22nd 23rd 15th
Season 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Rank 19th 18th 15th 14th 11th 8th 8th 8th*

*10 July 2019

Youth teams

Under-20

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2002: did not qualify 2004: 1st round 2006: did not qualify
2008: did not qualify 2010: did not qualify 2012: did not qualify
2014: did not qualify 2016: 5th 2018: Runner-up

Under-19

UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship
2002: Final Round 2003: Final Round 2004: Mozilla.svg Champion
2005: Second Round 2006: Second Round 2007: Final Round
2008: Final Round 2009: Second Round 2010: Final Round
2011: Final Round 2012: Runner-up 2013: did not qualify
2014: Runner-up 2015: Runner-up 2016: Runner-up
2017: Mozilla.svg Champion 2018: Mozilla.svg Champion 2019: TBD

Under-18

UEFA Women's Under-18 Championship
1998: did not qualify 1999: did not qualify 2000: Runner-up 2001: 4th (last edition)

Under-17

FIFA Under-17 Women's World Cup
FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup
2008: did not qualify 2010: Third Place 2012: did not qualify
2014: Runner-up 2016: Third Place 2018: Mozilla.svg Champion
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship
2008: did not qualify 2009: Runner-up 2010: Mozilla.svg Champion
2011: Mozilla.svg Champion 2012: did not qualify 2013: Third Place
2014: Runner-up 2015: Mozilla.svg Champion 2016: Runner-up
2017: Runner-up 2018: Mozilla.svg Champion 2019: Third Place

Under-16

There is also a women's national team that represents Spain in international football in under-16 categories and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation. This team usually participates each year in UEFA Women U-16 Development Tournament (although it is not an official tournament) with remarkable success[19]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Spain's women add to La Roja euphoria". FIFA. Retrieved 7 December 2012.
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  3. ^ The underground origin of the women's national team. Marca, 23 April 2013. David Menayo
  4. ^ Conchi Amancio's national team shook up the 1970s Spain. As Color, 17 July 2012
  5. ^ The official baptism of the women's national team. Marca, 14 May 2013. David Menayo.
  6. ^ "Why Spain is absent from the World Cup". Fox Soccer. Retrieved 5 August 2012.
  7. ^ Kassouf, Jeff (19 June 2015). "Spain players call firing Ignacio Quereda women's World Cup exit". Equalizer Soccer. Retrieved 8 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Quereda's reign as Spain coach ends after 27 years". Equalizer Soccer. 31 July 2015. Retrieved 4 September 2015.
  9. ^ "Vilda appointed coach of Spain's women's team". FIFA.com. 30 July 2015. Retrieved 4 September 2015.
  10. ^ Muñoz, Antonio D. (8 March 2017). "Champions of Algarve Cup". RFEF. Retrieved 8 June 2019.
  11. ^ "South Africa 0-4 Germany, China 0-0 Spain: Women's World Cup clockwatch – live!". theguardian.com. Guardian Media Group. 17 June 2019. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  12. ^ "La Selección española Absoluta femenina, distinguida en los Premios Nacionales del Deporte 2014" [The Spanish women's national team honored at the 2014 National Sports Awards]. RFEF (in Spanish). 10 July 2015. Retrieved 8 June 2019.
  13. ^ UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (June 2016)
  14. ^ UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (September 2016)
  15. ^ UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (November 2017)
  16. ^ UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (June 2018)
  17. ^ UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Overview (September 2018)
  18. ^ Ranking women's national football teams based on a formula invented and developed by Mark Ziaian
  19. ^ The U16s debut with a brilliant victory at the UEFA Development Tournament

External links

Ainhoa Tirapu

Ainhoa Tirapu de Goñi (born 4 September 1984) is a Spanish football goalkeeper who plays for Primera División club Athletic Bilbao and the Spain women's national football team.

Ana María Escribano

Ana María "Ani" Escribano López (born 2 December 1981) is a Spanish footballer who plays for Fontsanta Fatjó of the Preferente Femenina Catalana. A former Spain women's national football team international, she spent 19 years with first club FC Barcelona and one season with ÍBV in Iceland's Úrvalsdeild kvenna.

Ana Ruiz Mitxelena

Ana Ruiz Mitxelena was a Spanish football goalkeeper.As an international she played for Spain women's national football team (1984-1988) and Spain women's national futsal team.

Elisabeth Ibarra

Elisabeth "Eli" Ibarra Rabancho (born 29 June 1981) is a Spanish football left midfielder who plays for Primera División club Athletic Bilbao and the Spain women's national football team. She scored in Athletic's first two appearances in the UEFA Women's Cup.

Ignacio Quereda

Ignacio Quereda Laviña (born 24 July 1950) is a Spanish football coach who managed the Spain women's national football team between 1988 and 2015.

Irene Paredes

Irene Paredes Hernández (born 4 July 1991) is a Spanish footballer who plays as a defender for Paris Saint-Germain and the Spain women's national football team.

Itziar Gurrutxaga

Itziar Gurrutxaga Bengoetxea is a Spanish former footballer who played as a central midfielder for Athletic Bilbao.

She earned 37 caps scored 3 goals for the Spain women's national football team from 1998 to 2008.

Jennifer Hermoso

Jennifer Hermoso Fuentes (born 9 May 1990), commonly known as Jenni, is a Spanish footballer who plays for FC Barcelona of Spain's Primera División and for the Spain women's national football team.

Jorge Vilda

Jorge Vilda Rodríguez (born 7 July 1981) is a Spanish football coach who is the current manager of the Spain women's national football team.

He was nominated for the FIFA World Coach of the Year for Women's Football in 2014.

Leire Landa

Leire Landa Iroz (born 19 December 1986) is a former Spanish footballer who most recently played as a defender for Primera División club FC Barcelona and the Spain women's national football team. She previously played for Real Sociedad, Atlético Madrid, and Athletic Bilbao.

María José Pons

María José Pons Gómez (born 8 August 1984), commonly known as Mariajo, is a football goalkeeper who plays for Primeraa División club RCD Espanyol and the Spain women's national football team. She previously played for CD Sabadell, FC Barcelona, Levante UD, with whom she won one League and one Cup., and Valencia. She was a key player in the league success, conceding nine goals in 25 matches. She had previously won the 2003 Cup with CE Sabadell. During her four seasons with Espanyol (2009–2013) she added two further Cup winner's medals to her collection.

She is a member of the Spanish national team, where she is a reserve goalkeeper as of the 2013 European Championship qualifying. When regular custodian Ainhoa Tirapu was injured, Mariajo stood in for qualifying games against Switzerland and Turkey.

In June 2013, national team coach Ignacio Quereda confirmed Mariajo as a member of his 23-player squad for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 finals in Sweden.

Melisa Nicolau

Melisa Nicolau Martín (born 20 June 1984), commonly known as Melisa or Mely, is a Spanish former footballer, who played as a defender for Primera División clubs Rayo Vallecano and FC Barcelona, as well as the Spain women's national football team.

She has been a member of the Spanish national team, playing the qualification stages for the 2007 World Cup, the 2009 European Championship and the 2011 World Cup.In June 2013, national team coach Ignacio Quereda confirmed Melisa as a member of his 23-player squad for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013 finals in Sweden. She decided to end her nine-year national team career and retire from football after the tournament.

Míriam Diéguez

Míriam Diéguez de Oña (born 4 May 1986), commonly known as Míriam, is a Spanish football midfielder who plays for Málaga in the Primera División. She previously played for Espanyol, Rayo Vallecano and FC Barcelona, winning the league with all three. She was Espanyol's captain during her last years with the team.At international level Míriam won the 2004 U-19 European Championship and also represented Spain at the subsequent U-20 World Cup.She appeared for the senior Spain women's national football team in a 2–2 home draw with Finland on 15 February 2005. In June 2013, national team coach Ignacio Quereda included Míriam in his Spain squad for UEFA Women's Euro 2013 in Sweden.

Priscila Borja

Priscila Borja Moreno (born 28 April 1985) is a Spanish footballer, who plays for Primera División club Atlético Madrid. A fast winger or forward, she has represented the Spain women's national football team since 2011.

Spain at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Spain women's national football team has represented Spain at the FIFA Women's World Cup on two occasions, in 2015 and 2019.

Spain women's national under-17 football team

The Spain women's national under-17 football team represents Spain in international football in under-17 categories and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation. The youth team has reached the World Cup Finals on two occasions, first in 2014 and then again in 2018. It has also won bronze medals on the 2010 and 2016 editions.

On European Cup the team has reached a total of 8 finals. Becoming champions on 4 occasions and becoming runners-up on 4. Thus making them one of the most successful teams in the under-17 category.

Spain women's national under-19 football team

The Spain women's national under-19 football team represents Spain in international football in under-19 categories and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

Spain women's national under-20 football team

The Spain women's national under-20 football team represents Spain in international football in under-20 categories and is controlled by the Royal Spanish Football Federation.

FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
Canada 2015 Group stage 9 June  Costa Rica D 1–1 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
13 June  Brazil L 0–1
17 June  South Korea L 1–2 Lansdowne Stadium, Ottawa
France 2019 Group stage 8 June  South Africa W 3–1 Stade Océane, Le Havre
12 June  Germany L 0–1 Stade du Hainaut, Valenciennes
17 June  China PR D 0–0 Stade Océane, Le Havre
Round of 16 24 June  United States L 1–2 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims
Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
1987 EC QS Regular stage 0–1, 1–2 Hungary Hungary 3 / 4
0–2, 3–0 Switzerland Switzerland
2–3, 1–1 Italy Italy
1989 EC QS Regular stage 1–1, 1–0 Bulgaria Bulgaria 4 / 5
0–1, 0–2 Czech Republic Czechoslovakia
1–0, 0–1 Belgium Belgium
1–3, 0–0 France France
1991 EC QS Regular stage 0–0, 1–2 Switzerland Switzerland 4 / 5
1–3, 0–5 Denmark Denmark
1–0, 0–1 Belgium Belgium
1–3, 0–0 France France
1993 EC QS Regular stage 0–4, 1–1 Sweden Sweden 2 / 3
0–1, 1–0 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland Bakero
1995 EC QS Regular stage 0–0, 4–0 Belgium Belgium 2 / 4 Pascual (2), Bakero + 1 o.g.
0–0, 0–0 England England
17–0, 8–0 Slovenia Slovenia
1997 EC QS Regular stage (Class A) 0–1, 0–2 Denmark Denmark 3 / 4
5–1, 2–2 Romania Romania
1–1, 0–8 Sweden Sweden
Repechage 2–1, 1–1 England England 1 / 2
Norway Sweden 1997 Euro Group stage 1–1 France France 2 / 4 Parejo
0–1 Sweden Sweden
1–0 Russia Russia Parejo
Semifinals 1–2 Italy Italy 4 / 8 Parejo
1999 WC QS Regular stage (Class A) 1–2, 1–2 Ukraine Ukraine 4 / 4
1–2, 1–3 Sweden Sweden
0–0, 1–1 Iceland Iceland
Promotion 3–0, 4–1 Scotland Scotland 1 / 2 Monforte (2), Auxi, Cabezón, Gimbert, Marco, Mateos
2001 EC QS Regular stage (Class A) 2–5, 0–7 Sweden Sweden 3 / 4 Mateos, Rodríguez
0–1, 1–2 France France Mateos
1–1, 2–1 Netherlands Netherlands "Chola", Fuentes, Gimbert
Repechage 1–6, 2–4 Denmark Denmark 2 / 2 Cabezón, Gimbert, Mateos
2003 WC QS Regular stage (Class A) 6–1, 0–3 Iceland Iceland 4 / 4 Auxi (2), Del Río (2), Ferreira, Gimbert
0–2, 2–1 Russia Russia Auxi, Del Río
0–3, 0–1 Italy Italy
Promotion Cancelled Hungary Hungary
2005 EC QS Regular stage (Class A) 1–0, 0–0 Netherlands Netherlands 3 / 5 Del Río
0–2, 0–2 Norway Norway
9–1, 0–2 Belgium Belgium Del Río (5), Vázquez (2), Castillo, Gurrutxaga
0–1, 0–2 Denmark Denmark
2007 WC QS Regular stage (Class A) 2–3, 7–0 Poland Poland 3 / 5 Del Río (2)
1–0, 0–0 Finland Finland Cabezón
3–2, 4–2 Belgium Belgium Adriana (2), Cabezón, Gimbert, Gurrutxaga, Del Río + 1 o.g.
2–2, 0–5 Denmark Denmark Adriana, Vilanova
2009 EC QS Regular stage 3–0, 6–1 Belarus Belarus 2 / 5 Vázquez (3), Romero (2), Azagra, Cuesta, Auxi, Pérez
2–2, 4–1 Czech Republic Czech Republic Boquete (2), Adriana, Gimbert, Torrejón, Vilanova
0–1, 2–2 England England Bermúdez, Boquete
4–0, 3–0 Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Vázquez (2), Bermúdez, Boquete, García, Del Río, Vilas
Repechage 0–2, 0–2 Netherlands Netherlands 2 / 2
2011 WC QS Regular stage 13–0, 9–0 Malta Malta 3 / 5 Adriana (8), Bermúdez (3), Boquete (3), Romero (3), Ibarra (2), Casado, Meseguer + 1 o.g.
2–0, 1–0 Austria Austria Adriana (2), Bermúdez
5–0, 5–1 Turkey Turkey Adriana (5), Bermúdez (2), Boquete, Olabarrieta, Torrejón
0–1, 2–2 England England Adriana, Bermúdez
2013 EC QS Regular stage 10–1, 4–0 Turkey Turkey 2 / 6 Adriana (4), Boquete (3), Bermúdez (2), Borja, Corredera, Olabarrieta, Vilas + 1 o.g.
3–2, 3–4 Switzerland Switzerland Adriana (2), Boquete (2), García, Vilas
4–0, 13–0 Kazakhstan Kazakhstan Vilas (7), Bermúdez (3), Boquete (2), Borja (2), Adriana, Meseguer, Torrejón
4–0, 0–0 Romania Romania Boquete (2), Adriana, Bermúdez
2–2, 0–5 Germany Germany Boquete, Romero
Repechage 1–1, 3–2 Scotland Scotland 1 / 2 Adriana (2), Boquete, Meseguer
Sweden 2013 Euro Group stage 3–2 England England 2 / 4 Boquete, Hermoso, Putellas
0–1 France France
1–1 Russia Russia Boquete
Quarter-finals 1–3 Norway Norway 7 / 8 Hermoso
2015 WC QS Regular stage 6–0, 5–0 Estonia Estonia 1 / 6 Natalia (3), Bermúdez (2), Vicky (2), Hermoso (2), Torrejón, Paredes
2–0, 0–0 Italy Italy Bermúdez, Natalia
1–0, 2–0 Romania Romania Natalia (2), García
3–2, 1–0 Czech Republic Czech Republic Bermúdez (2), Corredera, Boquete
12–0, 10–0 North Macedonia Macedonia Natalia (6), Bermúdez (5), Hermoso (5), Boquete (2), Calderón (2), Losada, Torrejón
Canada 2015 World Cup Group stage 1–1 Costa Rica Costa Rica 4 / 4 Losada
0–1 Brazil Brazil
1–2 South Korea South Korea Boquete
2017 EC QS Regular stage 2–1, 5–0 Finland Finland 1 / 5 Paredes (2), Hermoso, Putellas, Sampedro, Torrecilla, Torrejón
3–0, 3–0 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland Boquete (2), Hermoso (2), Losada, + 1 o.g.
2–0, 4–1 Portugal Portugal Bermúdez, Boquete, Losada, Putellas, Sampedro, Torrecilla
7–0, 13–0 Montenegro Montenegro Boquete (5), Bermúdez (5), Losada (3), Putellas (2), Sampedro (2), Corredera, Hermoso, Torrecilla
Netherlands 2017 Euro Group stage 2–0 Portugal Portugal 2 / 4 Losada, Sampedro
0–2 England England
0–1 Scotland Scotland
Quarter-finals 0–0 Austria Austria 8 / 8
2019 WC QS Regular stage 6–0, 2–0 Israel Israel 1 / 5 Hermoso (2), Paredes (2), Latorre, Putellas, Sampedro, Vilas
2–1, 3–0 Serbia Serbia Hermoso (3), Guijarro, Sampedro
4–0, 1–0 Austria Austria Guijarro, Paredes, Putellas, Torrecilla
2–0, 5–1 Finland Finland Corredera (2), O. García, Hermoso, León, Nahikari, Paredes
National teams
Men's league system
Women's league system
Youth league system
Domestic cups
Women's domestic cups
Youth domestic cups
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Spain squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
Spain squads – UEFA Women's Championship
Spain at the FIFA Women's World Cup

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