Soviet Union national football team

The Soviet Union national football team (Russian: сбо́рная Сове́тского Сою́за по футбо́лу, sbornaya Sovyetskogo Soyuza po futbolu) was the national football team of the Soviet Union.

After the breakup of the Union the team was transformed into the CIS national football team (a formality name for a team of the non-existing country of Soviet Union). FIFA considers the CIS national football team (and ultimately, the Russia national football team) as the Soviet successor team[2] allocating its former records to them (except for the Olympic records which are not combined due to the IOC policy); nevertheless, a large percentage of the team's former players came from outside the Russian SFSR, mainly from the Ukrainian SSR, and following the breakup of the Soviet Union, some such as Andrei Kanchelskis from the former Ukrainian SSR, continued to play in the new Russia national football team.

The Soviet Union failed to qualify for the World Cup only twice, in 1974 and 1978, and attended seven finals tournaments in total. Their best finish was fourth in 1966, when they lost to West Germany in the semifinals, 2–1. The Soviet Union qualified for five European Championships, winning the inaugural competition in 1960 when they beat Yugoslavia in the final, 2–1. They finished second three times (1964, 1972, 1988), and fourth once (1968), when, having drawn with Italy in the semi-final, they were sent to the third place playoff match by the loss of a coin toss. The Soviet Union national team also participated in number of Olympic tournaments earning the gold medal in the 1956 and 1988. The Soviet team continued to field its national team players in Olympic tournaments despite the prohibition of FIFA in 1958 to field any national team players in Olympics. However, in 1960 and in 1964 the Soviets were fielding its second national team.

Soviet Union
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Red Army
AssociationFootball Federation of the Soviet Union
Most capsOleg Blokhin (112)
Top scorerOleg Blokhin (42)
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeURS
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current
Highest1 (July 1960)
Elo ranking
Current
Highest1 (1963–65, 1966, 1983-84, 1985–86, 1987, 1988)
First international
 Soviet Union 3–0 Turkey 
(Moscow, Soviet Union; 16 November 1924)

Last international

 Cyprus 0–3 Soviet Union 
(Larnaca, Cyprus; 13 November 1991)
Biggest win
 Soviet Union 11–1 India 
(Moscow, Soviet Union; 16 September 1955)[1]
 Finland 0–10 Soviet Union 
(Helsinki, Finland; 15 August 1957)
Biggest defeat
 England 5–0 Soviet Union 
(London, England; 22 October 1958)
World Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1958)
Best resultFourth place, 1966
European Championship
Appearances6 (first in 1960)
Best resultChampions, 1960

History

First games

Soviet union football team 1927
Soviet Union team of 1927

The first international match played by a Soviet team came in September 1922, when the Finnish Workers' Sports Federation football team toured Russia. The Soviet XI scored a 4–1 victory over the Finns in Petrograd. This was also the first international contact for Soviet sports after the 1917 October Revolution. In May 1923, the Soviet team visited Finland and beat the Finnish squad 5–0.[3][4] The first match against national team was played in August 1923, nine months after the establishment of the Soviet Union, when a Russian SFSR team beat Sweden 2–1 in Stockholm.[5]

The first formally recognised match played by the Soviet Union took place a year later, a 3–0 win over Turkey. This and a return match in Ankara were the only officially recognised international matches played by the Soviet Union prior to the 1952 Summer Olympics, though several unofficial friendlies against Turkey took place in the 1930s. The 1952 Olympics was the first competitive tournament entered by the Soviet Union. In the preliminary round, Bulgaria were defeated 2–1, earning a first round tie against Yugoslavia. Before the match, both Tito and Stalin sent telegrams to their national teams, which showed just how important it was for the two head of states.[6] Yugoslavia led 5–1, but a Soviet comeback in the last 15 minutes resulted in a 5–5 draw. The match was replayed, Yugoslavia winning 3–1.[7] The defeat to the archrivals hit Soviet football hard, and after just three games played in the season, CDKA Moscow, who had made up most of the USSR squad, was forced to withdraw from the league and later disbanded. Furthermore, Boris Arkadiev, who coached both USSR and CDKA, was stripped of his Merited Master of Sports of the USSR title.[8]

Sweden trials and the triumph

The Soviet Union entered the World Cup for the first time at the 1958 tournament, following a qualification playoff against Poland.[9] Drawn in a group with Brazil, England and Austria, they collected three points in total, one from England and two from Austria. Soviet Union and England went to a playoff game, in which Anatoli Ilyin scored in the 67th minute to knock England out. The Soviet Union were then eliminated by the hosts of the tournament, Sweden, in the quarter-finals.

The inaugural European Championships in 1960 marked the pinnacle of Soviet footballing achievement. Easily progressing to the quarter-finals, the team were scheduled to face Spain, but due to the tensions of the Cold War, Spain refused to travel to the Soviet Union, resulting in a walkover. In the semi-final, the Soviet team defeated Czechoslovakia 3–0 and reached the final, where they faced Yugoslavia.

In the final, Yugoslavia scored first, but the Soviet Union, led by legendary goalkeeper Lev Yashin, equalized in the 49th minute. After 90 minutes the score was 1–1, and Viktor Ponedelnik scored with seven minutes left in extra time to give the Soviets the inaugural European Championship.

The end of Kachalin's dream-team

Yashin v argentina
Lev Yashin trying to stop the shot by Argentine striker José Sanfilippo, during the match played at Buenos Aires in 1961. Soviet Union won 2–1

In the 1962 World Cup, the Soviet team was in Group 1 with Yugoslavia, Colombia and Uruguay. The match between Soviet Union and Colombia ended 4–4; Colombia scored a series of goals (68’, 72’, 86’). Star goalkeeper Lev Yashin was in poor form both against Colombia and Chile. His form was considered as one of the main reasons why Soviet Union team did not gain more success in the tournament.

In 1964, the Soviet Union attempted to defend their European Championship title, defeating Italy in the last 16 (2–0, 1–1) and to reach the quarter-finals. After two matches against Sweden, the Soviet side won on aggregate (1–1, 3–1). The Soviet Union team went to Spain where the finals were held. In the semi-finals, the Soviet Union defeated Denmark 3–0 in Barcelona but their dreams of winning the title again were dashed in the final when Spain, the host, scored a late goal, winning a 2-1.

The late 1960s: Semi-finals at World Cup and European Championships

The 1966 FIFA World Cup was the tournament which the Soviet Union team reached their best result by finishing in fourth place. Soviet Union was in Group 4 with North Korea, Italy and Chile. In all three matches, the Soviet Union team managed to defeat their rivals. The Soviet team then defeated Hungary in the quarter-finals thanks to the effective performance of their star, Lev Yashin but their success was ended by two defeats on 25 and 28 July, against West Germany in the semi-finals and Portugal in the third place play off match, respectively. The 1966 squad was the second best scoring Soviet team in the World Cup history, with 10 goals.

For the Euro 1968, the qualification competition was played in two stages; a group stage (taking place from 1966 until 1968) and the quarter-finals (played in 1968). Again, only four teams could reach the finals which were held in Italy. The semi-final match between Soviet Union and Italy ended 0–0. It was decided to toss a coin to see who reached the final, rather than play a replay. Italy won, and went on to become European champions. On 8 June 1968, the Soviets were defeated by England in the third place match.

Kachalin's second attempt

The 1970 World Cup started with the match between Mexico and the Soviet Union. The Soviet team became the first team to make a substitution in World Cup history in this match. Other opponents in their group were Belgium and El Salvador. The Soviet team easily qualified to the quarter-final where they lost against Uruguay in extra time. This was the last time the Soviet Union reached the quarter-finals. They were able to obtain 5th place in the rankings which FIFA released in 1986.

The final tournament of the 1972 European Championships took place between 14 and 18 June 1972. Again, only four teams were in the finals. Soviets defeated Hungary 1–0, a second half goal. The final was between West Germany and Soviet Union. The match ended with a victory of the German side thanks to the effective football of Gerd Müller. This tournament was one of the two tournaments in which the Soviet Union finished as runner-up.

Failures to qualify in the 1970s

Maradona v ussr 1979
The Soviet Union u-20 team playing the Argentine side at the 1979 FIFA World Youth Championship.

After being runners up at Euro 1972, the rest of the 1970s were bleak for the Soviets, who were disqualified from the 1974 World Cup as a result of refusal to play Chile in the aftermath of the 1973 Chilean coup d'état, and failed to qualify for the 1978 World Cup or the 1976 and 1980 European Championships.

Beskov recovers the team

The 1982 World Cup was the Soviet Union's first major tournament appearance for a decade. The Soviet Union was in Group 6 with Brazil, Scotland and New Zealand. Goals by Socrates and Eder marked the defeat of the Soviet side against Brazil in the first group match (even though it was a very hard match for the Brazilians), and they were eventually eliminated in the second round by finishing the group in second place, when they defeated Belgium only 1–0 and drew against Poland with an 0–0 result. In 1984, the Soviets again failed to qualify for the European Championships, but succeeded in qualifying for the 1986 World Cup. Soviet Union were in Group C with Hungary, France and Canada. The Soviets used Irapuato, Guanajuato as their training ground in the World Cup.

Lobanovsky era and demise of Soviet Union

The Soviet team enjoyed a successful group stage by scoring nine goals and finishing the group in first place. Ultimately, however, they lost to Belgium 3-4 after extra time in the round of 16. Despite their poor performance in the cup, this team was the best scoring Soviet team in World Cup history, with 12 goals. After failing to qualify for three consecutive European Cups (1976, 1980, 1984), the Soviets managed to qualify for the 1988 competition, the last time the Soviet Union national football team took part in the European Football Championship. The finals were held in West Germany, with eight teams participating. Soviet Union finished Group B as leaders above the Netherlands and defeated Italy 2-0 in the semi-final. In the final against the Netherlands, another team from Group B, the Netherlands won the match with a clear score to be crowned European champions.

The final major championship contested by the Soviet team was the 1990 FIFA World Cup, where they were drawn in Group B with Argentina, Romania and Cameroon. The only success for the Soviets came when they defeated group leaders Cameroon 4-0. The Soviets lost their other matches and failed to qualify from the group. The Soviet Union qualified for Euro 1992, but the breakup of the Soviet Union meant that their place was instead taken by the CIS national football team. After the tournament, the former Soviet Republics competed as separate independent nations, with FIFA allocating the Soviet team's record to Russia.[10]

Kit evolution

1958-1989 Home
0
0
1966 WC
(vs North Korea)
0
1970
Home
(vs Belgium)
0
1975
(vs Ireland)
0
0
1982 WC
Away
0
0
1986
Away
0
0
1988
Home
1988
Away
1990
Home
1990
Away
1991
Home
1991
Away

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup record

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

FIFA World Cup record Qualification Record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Did not enter
Italy 1934
France 1938
Brazil 1950
Switzerland 1954
Sweden 1958 Quarter-final 7th 5 2 1 2 5 6 Squad 5 4 0 1 18 3
Chile 1962 Quarter-final 6th 4 2 1 1 9 7 Squad 4 4 0 0 11 3
England 1966 Fourth Place 4th 6 4 0 2 10 6 Squad 6 5 0 1 19 6
Mexico 1970 Quarter-final 5th 4 2 1 1 6 2 Squad 4 3 1 0 8 1
West Germany 1974 Disqualified (forfeited) 6 3 1 2 5 4
Argentina 1978 Did not qualify 4 2 0 2 5 3
Spain 1982 Second Group Stage 7th 5 2 2 1 7 4 Squad 8 6 2 0 20 2
Mexico 1986 Round of 16 10th 4 2 1 1 12 5 Squad 8 4 2 2 13 8
Italy 1990 Group Stage 17th 3 1 0 2 4 4 Squad 8 4 3 1 11 4
Total Fourth Place 7/14 31 15 6 10 53 34 53 35 9 9 110 34

UEFA European Championship record

     Champions       Runners-up       Third Place       Fourth Place  

UEFA European Championship record Qualification Record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 5 1 Squad 2 2 0 0 4 1
Spain 1964 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 2 Squad 4 2 2 0 7 3
Italy 1968 Fourth Place 4th 2 0 1 1 0 2 Squad 8 6 0 2 19 8
Belgium 1972 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 1 3 Squad 8 5 3 0 16 4
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 Did not qualify 8 4 1 3 12 10
Italy 1980 6 1 3 2 7 8
France 1984 6 4 1 1 11 2
West Germany 1988 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 7 4 Squad 8 5 3 0 14 3
Sweden 1992 Dissolved and replaced by CIS national football team 8 5 3 0 13 2
Total 1 Title 5/8 13 7 2 4 17 12 58 34 16 8 103 41

Olympic record

Olympic record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads
1896–1912 Preceded with Russia
1920–1948 Did not enter
Finland 1952 Round 1 14th 3 1 1 1 8 9 Squad
Australia 1956 Gold medalists 1st 5 4 1 0 9 2 Squad
Italy 1960 Did not qualify
Japan 1964
Mexico 1968
West Germany 1972 Bronze medalists 3rd 7 5 2 0 17 6 Squad
Canada 1976 Bronze medalists 3rd 5 4 0 1 10 4 Squad
Since 1976 succeeded with Olympic team
Total Gold medalists 4/20 20 14 4 2 44 21

Honours

This is a list of honours for the senior Soviet Union national football team

FIFA World Cup

  • Fourth-place (1): 1966

UEFA European Championship

Olympic football tournament

Players

Most capped Soviet players

# Name Career Caps Goals
1 Oleg Blokhin 1972–1988 112 42
2 Rinat Dasayev 1979–1990 91 0
3 Albert Shesternev 1961–1971 90 0
4 Anatoliy Demyanenko 1981–1990 80 6
5 Volodymyr Bezsonov 1977–1990 79 4
6 Lev Yashin 1954–1967 78 0
7 Sergei Aleinikov* 1984–1991 77 6
8 Murtaz Khurtsilava 1965–1973 69 6
9 Oleg Protasov* 1984–1991 68 29
10 Valeriy Voronin 1960–1968 66 5
11 Oleg Kuznetsov* 1986–1991 63 1
12 Volodymyr Kaplichny 1968–1974 62 0
13 Valentin Ivanov 1956–1965 59 26
14 Vagiz Khidiatulin 1978–1990 58 6
15 Gennadiy Litovchenko* 1984–1990 58 15
16 Viktor Kolotov 1970–1978 55 22
17 Igor Netto 1952–1965 54 4
18 Igor Chislenko 1959–1968 53 20
19 Evgeniy Lovchev 1969–1977 52 1
20 Anatoliy Banishevskiy 1965–1972 50 19

Top goalscorers

The following statistic is based on the statistic published in Sovetskiy Sport of December 1991.[11]

# Player Career Goals (Caps) Pct.
1 Oleg Blokhin 1972–1988 42 (112) 0.375
2 Oleg Protasov 1984–1991 29 (68) 0.426
3 Valentin Ivanov 1956–1965 26 (59) 0.441
4 Eduard Streltsov 1955–1968 25 (38) 0.658
5 Viktor Kolotov 1970–1978 22 (55) 0.4
6 Viktor Ponedelnik 1960–1966 20 (29) 0.69
Igor Chislenko 1959–1968 20 (53) 0.377
8 Anatoliy Banishevskiy 1965–1972 19 (50) 0.38
9 Anatoliy Ilyin 1952–1959 16 (31) 0.516
10 Anatoliy Byshovets 1966–1972 15 (39) 0.385
Gennadiy Litovchenko[12] 1984–1990 14 (57) 0.259
12 Fedor Cherenkov 1979–1990 12 (34) 0.353
13 Sergei Salnikov 1954–1958 11 (20) 0.55
Volodymyr Onyschenko 1972–1977 11 (44) 0.25
Slava Metreveli 1958–1970 11 (48) 0.229
16 Nikita Simonyan 1954–1958 10 (20) 0.5
Ramaz Shengelia 1979–1983 10 (26) 0.385
Yuriy Gavrilov 1978–1985 10 (46) 0.217

Soviet managers

Notes:

Home venues record

Since Soviet's first fixture (16 November 1924 vs. Turkey) they have played their home games at various stadiums.

Venue City Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Points per game
Central Lenin Stadium Moscow 1956–1992 78 50 18 10 151 50 2.15
Central Stadium Kiev 1969–1990 12 10 1 1 27 6 2.58
Lenin Dynamo Stadium Tbilisi 1967–1987 10 6 1 3 19 9 1.9
Dynamo Stadium Moscow 1954–1971 9 7 2 0 41 8 2.56
Lokomotiv Stadium Simferopol 1979–1989 4 4 0 0 11 1 3
Kirov Stadium Leningrad 1967–1984 3 3 0 0 8 1 3
Hrazdan Stadium Yerevan 1978 2 2 0 0 12 2 3
Central Lokomotiv Stadium Moscow 1979–1988 2 2 0 0 5 1 3
Central Stadium Volgograd 1977 1 1 0 0 4 1 3
Vorovsky Stadium Moscow 1924 1 1 0 0 3 0 3
Black Sea Shipping Stadium Odessa 1974 1 0 0 1 0 1 0
Totals 1924-1992 123 86 22 15 281 80 2.28
Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

Note:

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Soviet Union 11:1 India". eu-football.info. Retrieved 2016-03-23.
  2. ^ "Member Association - Russia". FIFA.com.
  3. ^ Hentilä, Seppo (1982). Suomen työläisurheilun historia I. Työväen Urheiluliitto 1919–1944. Hämeenlinna: Karisto. pp. 146–148. ISBN 951-23216-0-2.
  4. ^ Hentilä, Seppo (2014). Bewegung, Kultur und Alltag im Arbeitersport (in German). Helsinki: The Finnish Society for Labour History. p. 48. ISBN 978-952-59762-6-7.
  5. ^ "Soviet Union - International Results 1911-1935". RSSSF. Retrieved 13 January 2007.
  6. ^ "USSR – Yugoslavia, the Story of Two Different Football Conceptions". http://russianfootballnews.com. Retrieved November 27, 2017. External link in |work= (help)
  7. ^ "Yugoslavia National Team List of Results 1950-1959". RSSSF. Retrieved 13 January 2007.
  8. ^ "USSR – Yugoslavia, the Story of Two Different Football Conceptions". russianfootballnews.com. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  9. ^ "1958 - Qualifying competition". Planet World Cup. Retrieved 13 January 2007.
  10. ^ "History. About FUR. General information. FUR". en.rfs.ru. Archived from the original on 9 September 2016.
  11. ^ Top goalscorers (in Russian)
  12. ^ www.rusteam.permian.ru, Кашинцев Александр. "Литовченко Геннадий Владимирович. Сборная России по футболу". www.rusteam.permian.ru.

External links

Preceded by
Inaugural champions
European champions
1960 (first title)
Succeeded by
1964 Spain
1960 European Nations' Cup Final

The 1960 European Nations' Cup Final was a football match at the Parc des Princes, Paris on 10 July 1960, to determine the winner of the 1960 European Nations' Cup. It was the first UEFA European Football Championship final, UEFA's top football competition for national teams. The match was contested by the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

1964 European Nations' Cup Final

The 1964 European Nations' Cup Final was a football match played on 21 June 1964 to determine the winner of the 1964 European Nations' Cup. The match was contested by the 1960 winners, the Soviet Union, and the hosts, Spain, at the Santiago Bernabéu in Madrid. Spain won the match 2–1, with goals coming from Jesús María Pereda and Marcelino. Galimzyan Khusainov scored for the Soviet Union.

Aleksandr Ponomarev

Oleksandr Ponomariov (Russian: Александр Семёнович Пономарёв; Ukrainian: Олександр Семенович Пономарьов 23 April 1918 – 7 June 1973) was a Soviet Ukrainian football player and manager.

Anatoliy Byshovets

Anatoliy Fedorovich Byshovets (Russian: Анатолий Фёдорович Бышовец; born 23 April 1946) is a Soviet-Russian football manager and former Soviet international striker. He played his entire professional career with club side Dynamo Kyiv. He won Olympic gold as a coach with the Soviet team at the 1988 Summer Olympics. He was also a manager of the USSR, Russia, and South Korea national teams. At the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, he managed the South Korean U-23 team. He is one of the most successful modern Russian coaches.

Boris Arkadyev

Boris Andreyevich Arkadyev (Russian: Бори́с Андре́евич Арка́дьев; 21 September 1899 – 17 October 1986) was a Russian footballer and a coach. He became the first coach of the Soviet Union national football team. Merited Master of Sports of the USSR (1942), Merited Coach of the USSR (1957).

Among teams of masters that he coached are included Metallurg Moscow (1937–1939), Dinamo Moscow (1940–1944), CDSA Moscow (1944–1952), Lokomotiv Moscow (1953–1957 and 1963–1965), CSK MO Moscow (1958–1959), Neftyanık Baku (1961–1962), Paxtakor Tashkent (1967), Neftyanik Fergana (1968) and FC Shinnik Yaroslavl (1969).

He also was a coach of the Soviet Union Olympic football team in 1952. In 1952 he had his title Merited Master of Sports of the USSR stripped, but it was reinstated back in 1955.

Boris had a twin brother Vitaliy Arkadiev (1899-1987) who was Merited Coach of the USSR in fencing.

Eduard Malofeyev

Eduard Vassilievich Malofeyev (Russian: Эдуа́рд Васи́льевич Малофе́ев, IPA: [məlɐˈfʲeɪf], Belarusian: Эдуард Васілевіч Малафееў Eduard Malafyeyew; born 2 June 1942 in Kolomna) is a Soviet and Belarusian football coach and former international player of Russian origin.Despite being born and grown in Russian SFSR, Malofeyev rose to prominence in Belarus, having scored over 100 goals in Soviet Top League for Dinamo Minsk. He is widely regarded as one of the best Belarusian coaches in history as he led Dinamo Minsk to the team's only Soviet champions title, and coached Belarus national football team in one of their most successful major competition qualifying campaigns.

Gavriil Kachalin

Gavriil Dmitriyevich Kachalin (Russian: Гавриил Дмитриевич Качалин; 17 January 1911 – 23 May 1995) was a Soviet/Russian football player and coach.

He led the USSR national football team to their greatest achievements, Olympics gold medals in 1956 and European Football Championship title in 1960, and also coached them in three World Cups: 1958, 1962 and 1970.

With Kachalin, FC Dinamo Tbilisi won the first Soviet Top League title in their history in 1964 and later finished 3rd twice, in 1971 and in 1972. Kachalin became 3rd again in 1973 with FC Dynamo Moscow.

Georgy Glazkov

Georgy Glazkov (Russian: Георгий Фёдорович Глазков) (18 November 1911–18 November 1968) was a Russian football striker and coach.

He spent much of his playing career between 1935 and 1947 at Spartak Moscow although during the Great Patriotic War in 1941 played for Zenit Moscow and MVO Moscow in 1945.At the end of the football career he began a career as coach. In the years 1948-1951 he led Spartak Vilnius, and from June to the end of 1951 managed Spartak Moscow. From 1953 to June 1954 he trained Metalurh Zaporizhya. In 1955 he helped to train the second team of the USSR. From 1955-1959 he held a position of the National Football Coach of the Department of Sports Committee of the USSR. In 1959, he became a coach of the USSR national team and in 1964 he led the youth team of the USSR. In the years 1963-1968 he also worked as a senior coach at FSzM Moscow. He died on November 18 1968 in Moscow.

Glazkov was champion of the USSR in 1936 (junior), 1938, 1939, USSR Championship bronze medalist in 1936, 1940, winner of the USSR Cup in 1938, 1939, 1946, 1947 and USSR Cup finalist in 1945. He was also bronze medalist in the First Division of the USSR in 1949 and 1950 as a coach.

German Zonin

German Semyonovich Zonin (Russian: Герман Семёнович Зонин; born 9 September 1926 in Kazan) is a retired Soviet Russian football coach and player.

Mikhail Yakushin

Mikhail Iosifovich Yakushin (Russian: Михаил Иосифович Якушин; 15 November 1910 in Moscow – 3 February 1997 in Moscow) was a Russian football and field hockey player, later a manager of Dynamo Moscow and the USSR.

Yakushin played football for Moscow clubs STS (1928–1929), SKiG (1931–1933), and Dynamo (1933–1944). He scored one goal in his three international matches for the Soviet national team. In the 1930s he also played field hockey for Dynamo, favoring hockey to football.

As a manager, he coached Dynamo Moscow from 1944 to 1950 and from 1953 to 1960, winning six Soviet titles (1945, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1959). He was the head coach of the USSR national football team in 1959 and from 1967 to 1968.

Nikolai Petrovich Morozov

Nikolai Petrovich Morozov (Russian: Николай Петрович Морозов; 25 August 1916 – 13 October 1981) was a Russian football coach, who led the USSR national football team to a fourth-place finish in the 1966 FIFA World Cup.

Soviet Union Olympic football team

The Soviet Union Olympic football team was the national football team of the Soviet Union from 1959 to 1990. The team participated in most of the qualification football tournaments for Summer Olympics. Until 1992, when age restrictions were officially introduced, the Soviet Union fielded its reserves in qualification tournaments, while in the finals the first team participated. Starting from 1990 the Soviet Union national under-21 football team participated in the Olympic qualifying competitions.

Soviet Union national under-16 football team

The Soviet national junior football team was the under-16 (continental competitions) and under-17 (world competitions) football team of the Soviet Union. It ceased to exist on the breakup of the Union.

Following the realignment of UEFA's youth competitions in 1982, the USSR Under-16 team was formed. The competition has been held since 1982. From 1982 to 2001 it was an Under-16 event. The team had a good record, winning the competition once, reaching the final twice, but failing to qualify for the last six on 10 occasions.

The team has participated in FIFA U-16 World Championship only once – in 1987 – after being qualified from European Under-16 championship as a runner-up. USSR won it in a final game against Nigeria by penalties. The team gained the Fair Play award. Yuriy Nikiforov scored 5 goals on the tournament but FIFA awarded the Golden Boot to Moussa Traoré because Côte d'Ivoire had scored fewer goals than USSR.

After the dissolution of the USSR (on December 26, 1991), the senior team played out its remaining fixtures, which were the finals of Euro 92. Because the USSR U-16s had, by December 26, already failed to qualify for their version of the 1992 European Championship, the former Soviet states didn't play as a combined team at U-17 level ever again.

Of the former Soviet states, only Russia entered the 1992–1993 competition. However, the Russian U-16 team should not be considered as a continuation of this team; a large percentage of the team's players came from outside Russia (Russia still provided the most). A total of 15 former Soviet states play international football today; 11 in Europe under UEFA, 4 in Asia under the AFC.

Soviet Union national under-20 football team

The Soviet national lads (youth) football team was a special under-18 football team of the Soviet Union designated specifically for FIFA World Youth Championship (today FIFA U-20 World Cup). It ceased to exist on the breakup of the Union.

The team was created in 1977 for the newly created FIFA competition for junior teams (among lads, under-18).

With dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Soviet Union youth under-18 football team competed at the 1992 UEFA European Under-18 Championship as the CIS youth under-18 football team which qualified for the 1993 FIFA World Youth Championship. That berth was passed over (grandfathered) to the Russia national under-20 football team.

Soviet Union women's national football team

The USSR women's national football team represented the Soviet Union in international women's football. The team was controlled by the Football Federation of USSR. It was founded in 1990, so it was a short-lived national team due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union the following year. Oleg Lapshin served as the team's coach during its 20 months of existence.

UEFA Euro 1972 Final

The UEFA Euro 1972 Final was a football match played on 18 June 1972 to determine the winner of UEFA Euro 1972. The match was contested by West Germany and the Soviet Union, fighting for its second title in the tournament, at the Heysel Stadium in Brussels. The Germans won the match 3–0, with goals coming from Gerd Müller (twice) and Herbert Wimmer.

UEFA Euro 1988 Final

The UEFA Euro 1988 Final was a football match played on 25 June 1988 to determine the winner of UEFA Euro 1988. The match was contested by the Soviet Union, playing in what would turn out to be the nation's last European Championship, and the Netherlands at the Olympiastadion in Munich. The Dutch won the match 2–0, with goals coming from captain Ruud Gullit, a header in the first half and tournament top scorer Marco van Basten. At 2-0, Hans van Breukelen saved a penalty from Igor Belanov, a penalty that he had given away for bringing down Sergey Gotsmanov.Van Basten's goal, in which he volleyed right-footed over Rinat Dasayev from the tightest of angles on the right of the penalty area from Arnold Muhren's looping ball from the left, would later be described as one of the greatest goals in the history of the European Championships.

Valentin Nikolayev (footballer)

Valentin Aleksandrovich Nikolayev (Russian: Валентин Александрович Николаев; August 16, 1921 in Yerosovo, Vladimir Governorate – October 9, 2009 in Moscow) was a Soviet football player and coach.

Yury Morozov (footballer, born 1934)

Yury Andreyevich Morozov (Russian: Ю́рий Андре́евич Моро́зов; 13 May 1934 – 15 February 2005) was one of the best football coaches from the Soviet Union.

He made his name as a midfielder in the 1950s and 1960s with his hometown clubs FC Zenit, Admiralteyets and FC Dinamo Leningrad, earning himself a call-up to the USSR 'B' team.

He retired from playing at the age of 31 and worked at FC Zenit's youth academy and became a dean of football science at the Lesgaft Academy of Physical Education. He then joined Valery Lobanovsky's USSR coaching staff, assisting the famous coach at the 1976 Olympics, where they won bronze, and in their run to the 1988 UEFA European Championship final. He also worked with Lobanovsky at clubs in the Middle East at the helm of the Kuwaiti national side.

In 1977, having previously been part of the coachings staff at Spartak Moscow, he took on his first head coach's job with former club Zenit leading them to third place in the Soviet Supreme League in 1980, their highest-ever finish at the time. He had three spells as head coach at FC Zenit over a 15-year period and in 1984 the team he built became Soviet champions for the only time. He left the club for the final time in 2002 due to ill health but returned to coaching at FC Petrotrest St. Peterburg.

Manager Nation Years Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win % Qualifying cycle Final tour
Boris Arkadiev Soviet Union 1952 3 1 1 1 8 9 33.33 1952(o)
Vasily Sokolov Soviet Union 1954 2 1 1 0 8 1 50
Gavriil Kachalin Soviet Union 1955–1958 34 22 6 6 88 35 64.71 1956(o), 1958, 1960 1956(o), 1958
Georgiy Glazkov Soviet Union 1959 1 1 0 0 3 1 100
Mikhail Yakushin Soviet Union 1959 2 2 0 0 2 0 100 1960
Gavriil Kachalin Soviet Union 1960–1962 22 16 2 4 49 20 72.73 1962 1960, 1962
Nikita Simonyan Soviet Union 1963 1 0 0 1 0 1 0
Konstantin Beskov Soviet Union 1963–1964 9 4 4 1 14 7 44.44 1964 1964
Nikita Simonyan Soviet Union 1964 1 0 1 0 2 2 0
Nikolai Morozov Soviet Union 1964–1966 31 15 9 7 51 33 48.39 1966 1966
Mikhail Yakushin Soviet Union 1967–1968 28 16 7 5 51 31 57.14 1968, 1968(o) 1968
Gavriil Kachalin Soviet Union 1969–1970 18 9 7 2 29 11 50 1970 1970
Valentin Nikolayev Soviet Union 1970–1971 13 8 5 0 24 5 61.54 1972
Nikolay Gulyayev Soviet Union 1972 4 2 1 1 6 4 50 1972
Aleksandr Ponomarev Soviet Union 1972 15 8 4 3 27 17 53.33 1972(o), 1972
German Zonin Soviet Union 1972 3 1 0 2 1 2 33.33
Yevgeny Goryansky Soviet Union 1973 10 3 2 5 6 6 30 1974*
Konstantin Beskov Soviet Union 1974 3 1 0 2 1 4 33.33 1976
Valeriy Lobanovsky Soviet Union 1975–1976 19 11 4 4 33 18 57.89 1976 1976(o)
Valentin Nikolayev Soviet Union 1976 2 0 1 1 0 2 0
Nikita Simonyan Soviet Union 1977–1979 27 18 4 5 60 22 66.67 1978, 1980
Konstantin Beskov Soviet Union 1979–1982 28 17 8 3 54 19 60.71 1980, 1982 1982
Oleg Bazilevich Soviet Union 1979 1 1 0 0 3 1 100
Valeriy Lobanovsky Soviet Union 1982–1983 10 6 3 1 18 6 60 1984
Eduard Malofeyev Soviet Union 1984–1986 25 14 3 8 37 23 56 1986
Valeriy Lobanovsky Soviet Union 1986–1987 17 9 6 2 31 11 52.94 1988 1986
Nikita Simonyan Soviet Union 1988 1 1 0 0 4 0 100
Morozov and Mosyagin Soviet Union 1988 4 1 2 1 5 5 25
1st Coaching Staff Soviet Union 1988–1990 31 16 6 9 42 29 51.61 1990 1988, 1990
2nd Coaching Staff Soviet Union 1990–1992 28 12 11 5 39 24 42.86 1992 1992
National teams
League system
Domestic cups
Awards
Lists
Categories
National teams
League system
Domestic cups
Awards
Lists
Categories
Active
Defunct
Recognised as defunct by FIFA
Teams whose names and borders
both differ from the present
Soviet Union squads – FIFA World Cup
Soviet Union squads – UEFA European Championship
Finalists

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.