South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue

South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of South Yorkshire, England. The service covers the areas of Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield[1]

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South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue
South Yorkshire Fire logo
Operational area
Country England
CountySouth Yorkshire
Facilities and equipment
Stations21
Website
Official website

Stations

South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Reclaim UK 1. 129
South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue officer fighting a fire at a reclamation yard in July 2013

Currently the service operates 21 fire stations across the county, 17 of which are staffed on a wholetime basis, with the remaining four staffed by on-call retained firefighters. [2]

The stations can be found in:[2]

Barnsley
Barnsley
Cudworth
Penistone
Tankersley
Doncaster District
Doncaster
Adwick-le-Street
Askern, Doncaster
Edlington
Rossington
Thorne
Rotherham District
Rotherham
Dearne
Maltby
Aston Park
Sheffield
Central
Birley Moor
Elm Lane
Lowedges
Parkway
Rivelin Valley
Stocksbridge

Two new fire stations are now open at Parkway and Birley Moor in Sheffield replacing the stations at Mansfield Road, Darnall Road and Mosborough.

Appliances

  • 18 Water Rescue Ladders (WRL)
  • 4 Heavy Rescue Pumps (HRP)
  • 2 Turntable Ladders (TL)
  • 1 Water Rescue Unit
  • 1 Water Carrier
  • 2 Incident Command Units (ICU)
  • 1 B.A Support Unit
  • 1 Incident Response Unit (IRU)
  • 2 High-Volume Pumps
  • 1 Line Rescue Unit
  • 2 Small Fire Units
  • 2 Co-Responder Vehicle (CRV)
  • 1 Welfare Unit

See also

References

  1. ^ Districts of the service/area covered (accessed 4 February 2007) Archived 29 January 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b Status of FRS fire stations (accessed 4 February 2007) Archived 13 February 2007 at the Wayback Machine

External links

1995 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 1995 were appointments by most of the sixteen Commonwealth realms of Queen Elizabeth II to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by citizens of those countries, and honorary ones to citizens of other countries. They were announced on 31 December 1994 to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 1995 in the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Cook Islands, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Belize.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

2000 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 2000 for the United Kingdom and New Zealand were announced on 31 December 1999, to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 2000. The Honours list is a list of people who have been awarded one of the various orders, decorations, and medals of the United Kingdom. Honours are split into classes ("orders") and are graded to distinguish different degrees of achievement or service, most medals are not graded. The awards are presented to the recipient in one of several investiture ceremonies at Buckingham Palace throughout the year by the Sovereign or her designated representative. The Prince of Wales and The Princess Royal were deputised for The Queen.

The orders, medals and decorations are awarded by various honours committees which meet to discuss candidates identified by public or private bodies, by government departments or who are nominated by members of the public. Depending on their roles, those people selected by committee are submitted either to the Prime Minister, Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, or Secretary of State for Defence for their approval before being sent to the Sovereign for final approval. As the "fount of honour" the monarch remains the final arbiter for awards. In the case of certain orders such as the Order of the Garter and the Royal Victorian Order they remain at the personal discretion of the Queen.The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

2008 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 2008 for the Commonwealth realms were announced on 29 December 2007, to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 2008.

The recipients of honours are displayed here as they were styled before their new honour, and arranged firstly by the country whose ministers advised the Queen on the appointments, then by honour, with classes (Knight, Knight Grand Cross, etc.) and then divisions (Military, Civil, etc.) as appropriate.

2013 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 2013 were appointments by some of the 16 Commonwealth realms to various orders and honours to recognise and reward good works by citizens of those countries. The New Year Honours are awarded as part of the New Year celebrations at the start of January.

The New Year Honours were announced on 28 December 2012 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, on 31 December 2012 in New Zealand, and 28 December 2012 in the Cook Islands, Barbados, Grenada, Solomon Islands, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Belize, and Antigua and Barbuda,The recipients of honours are displayed as they were styled before their new honour and arranged by the country (in order of precedence) whose ministers advised The Queen on the appointments, then by honour with grades i.e. Knight/Dame Grand Cross, Knight/Dame Commander etc. and then divisions i.e. Civil, Diplomatic and Military as appropriate.

2016 Portugal wildfires

The 2016 Portugal wildfires are a series of wildfires that burned across mainland Portugal and the Madeira archipelago in the north Atlantic Ocean during August 2016 that prompted the evacuation of more than one thousand people and destroyed at least 37 homes near Funchal on Madeira island. Flights were also disrupted at Cristiano Ronaldo International Airport due to high levels of smoke.At least seven major fires were burning out of control in the north of Portugal on August 9, according to officials, the fire of Arouca and S.Pedro do Sul was the biggest.

The authorities say around 3,000 firefighters are trying to extinguish hundreds of forest fires across the country.

An emergency was declared in Portugal's northern Norte Region as firefighters battled numerous wildfires.

2018 New Year Honours

The 2018 New Year Honours are appointments by some of the 16 Commonwealth realms to various orders and honours to recognise and reward good works by citizens of those countries. The New Year Honours are awarded as part of the New Year celebrations at the start of January and were officially announced in The London Gazette on 30 December 2017. Australia, an independent Realm, has a separate honours system and its first honours of the year, the 2018 Australia Day Honours, coincide with Australia Day on 26 January. New Zealand, also an independent Realm, has its own system of honours.

The 2018 honours list includes knighthoods for music legends Ringo Starr — which was reported by the press a week before the list was made public — and Barry Gibb. Veteran actor Hugh Laurie, who was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2007, was advanced to a Commander of the Order (CBE). Former ballerina Darcey Bussell was created a Dame Commander of the Order (DBE) and Lady Antonia Fraser, author and historian, received the Order of the Companions of Honour.The highest chivalric honour was awarded to Richard Scott, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry, who was appointed a Knight Companion of the Order of the Thistle, filling the vacancy since the death of Lady Marion Fraser on 25 December 2016. The ancient order is reserved for Scots and is limited to 16 ordinary members.The recipients of honours are displayed as they were styled before their new honour and arranged by the country (in order of precedence) whose ministers advised The Queen on the appointments, then by honour with grades i.e. Knight/Dame Grand Cross, Knight/Dame Commander etc. and then divisions i.e. Civil, Diplomatic and Military as appropriate.

2018 United Kingdom wildfires

Starting on 24 June 2018 and continuing through summer, a record-breaking series of wildfires burned across the United Kingdom. The two largest fires, which were declared major incidents, burned over 7 square miles (4,480 acres; 18 km2) each and broke out on Saddleworth Moor in Greater Manchester and Winter Hill in Lancashire. Other large fires broke out in Glenshane Pass in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland (640 acres) and in the Vale of Rheidol in Ceredigion, Wales. The Saddleworth Moor fire has been described as the largest English wildfire in living memory. Most of the wildfires occurred during the first official heatwave in the United Kingdom since June 2017, with temperatures reaching above 30 °C (86 °F) for several days, making the hottest June in the country since 1995, and the driest June for over ten years in large parts of the United Kingdom, exacerbating the crisis. A wildfire started on the Staffordshire Moorlands on 9 August and, despite rain, had spread to cover 219 acres by 11 August. Some hot spots were still burning as at 22 August. In total, there were 79 fires over the course of the year, a new record. However, the record was beaten in 2019 with 96 fires as of April 23rd.

Burbage Brook

Burbage Brook is an upper tributary stream of the River Derwent in the Peak District of England.

Cudworth, South Yorkshire

Cudworth is an urban village approximately 3.5 miles (5.6 km) north-east of Barnsley transport interchange in South Yorkshire, England. Historically within the West Riding of Yorkshire, Cudworth has a busy shopping area along the Barnsley to Pontefract Road which serves a local population of 10,977. The modern village equates roughly to the Cudworth ward of Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council and with a mix of housing types with a great many developments from the inter-war and post-war periods. These supplement a small residual number of more ancient dwellings and buildings reflecting the importance of the rural economy before the opening of the deep mine collieries in the near vicinity at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The village is still surrounded by open space, including green belt, regenerated public open spaces that were formerly part of neighbouring collieries and the remaining agricultural land which still dominates the south and south-east sides of the village.

Between 1840 and 1968 the village was served by Cudworth railway station.

Cudworth is a settlement with two distinct historic centres known as Upper or Over Cudworth and Low or Nether Cudworth. Nether Cudworth was the centre of the old manor of Cudworth but Upper Cudworth was better placed for the road network.

Fire services in the United Kingdom

The fire services in the United Kingdom operate under separate legislative and administrative arrangements in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland.

Emergency cover is provided by over fifty agencies. These are officially known as a fire and rescue service (FRS) which is the term used in modern legislation and by government departments. The older terms of fire brigade and fire service survive in informal usage and in the names of a few organisations. England and Wales (and formerly Scotland) have local fire services which are each overseen by a fire authority, which is made up of representatives of local governments. Fire authorities have the power to raise a Council Tax levy for funding, with the remainder coming from the government. Scotland and Northern Ireland have centralised fire services, and so their authorities are effectively committees of the devolved parliaments. The total budget for fire services in 2014-15 was £2.9 billion.Central government maintains national standards and a body of independent advisers through the Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser, which was created in 2007, while Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services provides direct oversight. The devolved government in Scotland has a similar agency, HMFSI Scotland.

Firefighters in the United Kingdom are allowed to join unions, the main one being the Fire Brigades Union, while chief fire officers (the heads of the various FRS) are members of the National Fire Chiefs Council,(formerly the Chief Fire Officers Association), which has some role in national co-ordination.

The fire services have undergone significant changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational procedures in the light of terrorism attacks and threats.

History of fire brigades in the United Kingdom

The history of fire brigades in the United Kingdom charts the development of Fire services in the United Kingdom from the creation of the United Kingdom to the present day.

Martin Blunden

Martin Blunden is a British firefighter. He is the Chief Fire Officer of the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service.

Matt Wrack

Matthew D. Wrack (born 23 May 1962) is a British trade unionist and former firefighter. He was elected General Secretary of the Fire Brigades Union (FBU) in May 2005.

Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council

Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council is the local authority of the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham in South Yorkshire, England. It is a metropolitan district council, one of four in South Yorkshire and one of 36 in the metropolitan counties of England. The council was created by the Local Government Act 1972.

In February 2015 the elected council had its powers suspended and transferred to commissioners appointed by HM Government after it was severely criticised by the Casey report into the Rotherham child sexual exploitation scandal. Power is being returned to the council in phases, with the council expected to fully regain its powers by March 2019.

Sheffield

Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield is 577,800 (mid-2017 est.) and it is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group. Sheffield is the third-largest English district by population. The metropolitan population of Sheffield is 1,569,000.The city is in the eastern foothills of the Pennines, and the valleys of the River Don and its four tributaries, the Loxley, the Porter Brook, the Rivelin and the Sheaf. Sixty-one per cent of Sheffield's entire area is green space, and a third of the city lies within the Peak District national park. There are more than 250 parks, woodlands and gardens in the city, which is estimated to contain around 4.5 million trees.Sheffield played a crucial role in the Industrial Revolution, with many significant inventions and technologies developed in the city. In the 19th century, the city saw a huge expansion of its traditional cutlery trade, when stainless steel and crucible steel were developed locally, fuelling an almost tenfold increase in the population. Sheffield received its municipal charter in 1843, becoming the City of Sheffield in 1893. International competition in iron and steel caused a decline in these industries in the 1970s and 1980s, coinciding with the collapse of coal mining in the area.

The 21st century has seen extensive redevelopment in Sheffield, along with other British cities. Sheffield's gross value added (GVA) has increased by 60% since 1997, standing at £9.2 billion in 2007. The economy has experienced steady growth averaging around 5% annually, greater than that of the broader region of Yorkshire and the Humber.The city has a long sporting heritage, and is home to the world's oldest football club, Sheffield F.C. Games between the two professional clubs, Sheffield United and Sheffield Wednesday, are known as the Steel City derby. The city is also home to the World Snooker Championship and the Sheffield Steelers, the UK's first professional ice hockey team.

South Yorkshire

South Yorkshire is a metropolitan county in England. It is the southernmost county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region and had a population of 1.34 million in 2011. It has an area of 1,552 square kilometres (599 sq mi) and consists of four metropolitan boroughs, Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield. South Yorkshire was created on 1 April 1974 as a result of the Local Government Act 1972. Its largest settlement is Sheffield.

Lying on the east side of the Pennines, South Yorkshire is landlocked, and borders Derbyshire to the west and south-west, West Yorkshire to the north-west, North Yorkshire to the north, the East Riding of Yorkshire to the north-east, Lincolnshire to the east and Nottinghamshire to the south-east. The Sheffield Urban Area is the tenth most populous conurbation in the United Kingdom, and dominates the western half of South Yorkshire with over half of the county's population living within it. South Yorkshire lies within the Sheffield City Region with Barnsley also being within the Leeds City Region, reflecting its geographical position midway between Yorkshire's two largest cities.

South Yorkshire County Council was abolished in 1986 and its metropolitan boroughs are now effectively unitary authorities, although the metropolitan county continues to exist in law. As a ceremonial county, South Yorkshire has a Lord Lieutenant and a High Sheriff.

South Yorkshire was created from 32 local government districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire (the administrative county and four independent county boroughs), with small areas from Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

In the 2016 referendum on the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union, South Yorkshire voted 62% leave and 38% remain, making it one of the most heavily Leave areas in the country.

South Yorkshire Joint Secretariat

The South Yorkshire Joint Secretariat (SYJS) is a body established to provide support to the four joint authorities that were formed in South Yorkshire following the abolition of the South Yorkshire County Council in 1986. When the county council was abolished, joint-boards were established to manage policing, fire and rescue services, integrated transport and pensions on a county wide basis.

The four authorities supported by the joint secretariat are:

Sheffield City Region Combined Authority

South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Authority

South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive

South Yorkshire Pensions Authority

South Yorkshire Police and Crime CommissionerThe metropolitan county of South Yorkshire consists of four metropolitan districts; the City of Sheffield, the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham, the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster and the Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley which function as de facto unitary authorities.

Tom Cowan

Thomas "Tom" Cowan (born 28 August 1969) is a Scottish former footballer, who played as a defender.

During his career he played for Clyde, Rangers, Sheffield United, Stoke City, Huddersfield Town, Burnley, Cambridge United, Peterborough United, York City, Dundee, Carlisle United, Barrow, Workington, Hucknall Town, Stalybridge Celtic, Hyde United and Retford United.

West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service

The West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England. It is administered by a joint authority of 22 people who are appointed annually from the five metropolitan boroughs of West Yorkshire, known as the Fire and Rescue Authority.

West Yorkshire covers an area of approximately 800 square miles (2,100 km2) which includes remote moorland, rural villages, large towns and cities as well as Leeds Bradford International Airport. The fire and rescue service's headquarters are located at Oakroyd Hall, Bradford Road, Birkenshaw, Bradford. There is also a large training centre at Birkenshaw used by other authorities besides West Yorkshire.

In 2006, the service was listed as being the fourth largest in England (behind London, the West Midlands and Greater Manchester fire services) with 1,600 wholetime firefighters and 199 retained. It has 47 fire appliances based at 41 stations, sub divided into five districts; Bradford, Calderdale, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield.

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