South Korea women's national football team

The South Korea women's national football team (Korean대한민국 여자 축구 국가대표팀; Hanja大韓民國女子蹴球國家代表팀) represents South Korea in international women's football competitions. The team is referred to as the Korea Republic by FIFA. Its first game was a match against Japan in 1990, which it lost 13–1. Since then, it has qualified for three FIFA World Cups, in 2003, 2015, and 2019.

Korea Republic
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Taegeuk Nangja (Taegeuk Ladies)
AssociationKorea Football Association
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationEAFF (East Asia)
Head coachYoon Deok-yeo
CaptainCho So-hyun
Most capsCho So-hyun (124)[1]
Top scorerJi So-yun (54)[1]
FIFA codeKOR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 20 Decrease 6 (12 July 2019)[2]
Highest14 (December 2017, September 2018 – present)
Lowest26 (August 2004)
First international
 Japan 13–1 South Korea 
(Seoul, South Korea; 6 September 1990)
Biggest win
 South Korea 19–0 Northern Mariana Islands 
(Tainan County, Taiwan; 26 August 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Japan 13–1 South Korea 
(Seoul, South Korea; 6 September 1990)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2003)
Best resultRound of 16 (2015)
Asian Cup
Appearances12 (first in 1991)
Best resultThird place (2003)

History

1949–2002: Beginnings

Less than a year after the government of the Republic of Korea was established in 1948, the first official women's football matches were held in Seoul on 28 and 29 June 1949, as a part of the National Girls' and Women's Sport Games. While women's basketball and volleyball won public recognition through the Games, football was seen as being unsuitable for women and as being unattractive to the public; as a result, the girls' teams were disbanded soon after the event.[3]

When women's football was officially adopted at the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing, the South Korean sports authorities decided to form a women's team with athletes from other sports and send the team to the Games.[3] The result was defeat in all matches against Japan, North Korea, China and Chinese Taipei.[4] Nevertheless, colleges and corporations started to launch women's football teams through the 1990s and the first annual national women's football event, the Queen's Cup, was held in 1993. With these changes, South Korea was able to finish in fourth place at the 1995 AFC Women's Championship in Malaysia.[5]

When the 1999 Women's World Cup sparked interest worldwide, the South Korean ministry in charge of sports sponsored the foundation of new teams and tournaments for girls’ high school teams, university teams and company teams. To promote women’s football, the Korea Women's Football Federation (KWFF) was established in March 2001, as an independent organization in association with the Korea Football Association (KFA).[3]

2003–2013: First World Cup and a period of decline

South Korea finished in third place at the 2003 AFC Women's Championship and qualified for the World Cup for the first time. The Taegeuk Ladies were drawn in Group B with Norway, France and Brazil. Their first match played at the World Cup was a 3–0 loss to Brazil on 21 September 2003. They went on to lose 1–0 to France and 7–1 to Norway. Kim Jin-hee scored the first ever South Korean World Cup goal on 27 September 2003 against Norway.

Despite winning the inaugural EAFF E-1 Football Championship on home soil in 2005, South Korea failed to qualify for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The Taegeuk Ladies won bronze at the 2010 Asian Games and at the 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championship, but once again failed to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

2014–present: Second World Cup

South Korea finished in fourth place at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup and qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they made it out of the group stage for the first time. They were drawn in Group E with Brazil, Spain and Costa Rica. South Korea lost 2–0 to Brazil on 9 June 2015, but a 2–2 draw with Costa Rica on 13 June and a 2–1 victory against Spain on 17 June were enough to progress for the first time ever at a World Cup. They went on to lose 3–0 to France in the round of 16 on 21 June 2015.

2019 World Cup: Third World Cup

Coming off a somewhat successful showing at the previous one, South Korea qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup and were put in Group A with France, Norway and Nigeria. However, they could not repeat their prior success in 2015 and lost all three games and exited the tournament in the group stage, only scoring one goal in their entire run and even an own goal.

Competition records

World Cup

World Cup record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA GD
China 1991 Did not qualify
Sweden 1995
United States 1999
United States 2003 Group stage 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10
China 2007 Did not qualify
Germany 2011
Canada 2015 Round of 16 4 1 1 2 4 8 −4
France 2019 Group stage 3 0 0 3 1 8 −7
Total 3/8 10 1 1 8 6 27 −21
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
United States 2003 Group stage 21 September  Brazil L 0–3 RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C.
24 September  France L 0–1
27 September  Norway L 1–7 Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
Canada 2015
Group stage 9 June  Brazil L 0–2 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
13 June  Costa Rica D 2–2
17 June  Spain W 2–1 Lansdowne Stadium, Ottawa
Round of 16 21 June  France L 0–3 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
France 2019 Group stage 7 June  France L 0–4 Parc des Princes, Paris
12 June  Nigeria L 0–2 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
17 June  Norway L 1–2 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims

Asian Cup

AFC Women's Asian Cup record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA GD
Hong Kong 1975 Did not participate
Taiwan 1977
India 1979
Hong Kong 1981
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1983
Hong Kong 1986
Hong Kong 1989
Japan 1991 Group stage 3 0 0 3 0 22 −22
Malaysia 1993 3 1 0 2 4 9 −5
Malaysia 1995 Fourth place 5 2 1 2 11 5 +6
China 1997 Group stage 2 1 0 1 11 1 +10
Philippines 1999 4 3 0 1 30 5 +25
Chinese Taipei 2001 Fourth place 6 4 0 2 16 10 +6
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 2003 Third place 6 4 1 1 22 5 +17
Australia 2006 Group stage 4 2 0 2 14 6 +8
Vietnam 2008 3 2 0 1 5 3 +2
China 2010 3 1 1 1 6 3 +3
Vietnam 2014 Fourth place 5 2 1 2 18 4 +14
Jordan 2018 5th place 4 2 2 0 9 0 +9
Total 12/19 48 24 6 18 146 73 +73

Olympics

Olympic Games record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA GD
United States 1996 Did not quality
Australia 2000
Greece 2004
China 2008
United Kingdom 2012
Brazil 2016
Japan 2020 To be determined
Total 0/7

Asian Games

Asian Games record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GS GA GD
China 1990 5th place 5 1 0 4 2 30 −28
Japan 1994 Fourth place 3 0 0 3 0 9 −9
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1998 Group stage 3 1 1 1 8 4 +4
South Korea 2002 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 6 8 −2
Qatar 2006 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 7 10 −3
China 2010 Third place 5 3 1 1 14 4 +10
South Korea 2014 Third place 6 5 0 1 33 2 +31
Indonesia 2018 Third place 6 5 0 1 32 3 +29
Total 8/8 38 19 2 16 102 71 +31

EAFF Women's Football Championship

EAFF Women's Football Championship record
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GF GA GD
South Korea 2005 Champions 3 2 1 0 3 0 +3
China 2008 Fourth place 6 3 0 3 15 9 +6
Japan 2010 Third place 7 5 0 2 47 4 +43
South Korea 2013 Third place 3 1 0 2 4 5 –1
China 2015 Runners-up 6 5 0 1 29 3 +26
Japan 2017 Fourth place 6 3 0 3 43 7 +36
South Korea 2019
Total 6/6 31 19 1 11 141 28 +113
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Peace Queen Cup

Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
South Korea 2006 Group Stage 3 0 0 3 2 6 −4
South Korea 2008 Fourth place 3 2 0 1 5 4 +1
South Korea 2010 Champions 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1
Total 3/3 9 3 2 4 9 11 –2

Kits

Kit used in 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup match vs Brazil.

The women's team usually use exactly the same kit as its men counterpart, along with the combinations available. However, there were many combinations that the men's team never used.

Coaching staff

Position Name
Manager South Korea Yoon Deok-Yeo
Assistant Manager South Korea Jeong Seong-cheon
Coach South Korea Kim Eun-jung
Goalkeeping Coach South Korea Jeong Yuseok

Recent schedule and results

2019

Players

Current squad

Squad for the 2019 Four Nations Tournament and 2019 Cup of Nations.[6][7]

Caps and goals correct as of: 11 January 2019.

Head coach: Yoon Deok-yeo

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Kang Ga-ae 10 December 1990 (age 28) 9 0 South Korea Gumi Sportstoto
2 DF Kim Hye-ri 25 June 1990 (age 29) 78 1 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
3 DF Hong Hye-ji 25 August 1996 (age 22) 16 1 South Korea Changnyeong
4 DF Jeong Yeong-a 9 December 1990 (age 28) 12 0 South Korea Gyeongju KHNP
5 DF Park Se-ra 24 February 1990 (age 29) 0 0 South Korea Gyeongju KHNP
6 DF Jang Sel-gi 31 May 1994 (age 25) 47 11 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
7 MF Kang Yu-mi 5 October 1991 (age 27) 24 8 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO
8 MF Ji So-yun 21 February 1991 (age 28) 119 54 England Chelsea
9 MF Han Chae-rin 2 September 1996 (age 22) 15 3 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
10 FW Lee Geum-min 7 April 1994 (age 25) 43 14 South Korea Gyeongju KHNP
11 MF Lee Min-a 8 November 1991 (age 27) 51 14 Japan INAC Kobe Leonessa
12 FW Jung Seol-bin 6 January 1990 (age 29) 72 20 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
13 MF Jeon Ga-eul 14 September 1988 (age 30) 96 38 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO
14 MF Cho So-hyun 24 June 1988 (age 31) 124 20 England West Ham United
16 MF Lee So-dam 12 October 1994 (age 24) 45 4 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
17 FW Son Hwa-yeon 15 March 1997 (age 22) 13 6 South Korea Changnyeong
18 GK Kim Jung-mi 16 October 1984 (age 34) 113 0 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
19 MF Lee Young-ju 22 April 1992 (age 27) 24 2 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
20 FW Yeo Min-ji 27 April 1993 (age 26) 28 10 South Korea Gumi Sportstoto
21 GK Jung Bo-ram 22 July 1991 (age 27) 3 0 South Korea Hwacheon KSPO
22 DF Lee Eun-mi 18 August 1988 (age 30) 84 14 South Korea Suwon UDC
23 MF Jang Chang 21 June 1996 (age 23) 10 0 South Korea Seoul
24 DF Shin Dam-yeong 20 October 1993 (age 25) 31 1 South Korea Suwon UDC
25 DF Ha Eun-hye 27 November 1995 (age 23) 3 0 South Korea Gumi Sportstoto
26 DF Lim Seon-joo 27 November 1990 (age 28) 72 5 South Korea Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels

Records

Most capped players

# Name South Korea career Caps
1 Cho So-hyun 2007–present 124
3 Kim Jung-mi 2003–present 113
2 Ji So-yun 2006–present 119
4 Kwon Hah-nul 2006–present 103
5 Jeon Ga-eul 2007–present 96
6 Yoo Young-a 2007–present 87
7 Lee Eun-mi 2007–present 84
8 Kim Do-yeon 2007–present 80
9 Kim Hye-ri 2010–present 78
10 Lee Myung-hwa 1990–2004 81
*Active players in bold, statistics as of 1 September 2018.[1]

Top goalscorers

# Player South Korea career Goals Caps
1 Ji So-yun 2006–present 54 119
2 Jeon Ga-eul 2007–present 38 95
3 Yoo Young-a 2007–present 32 87
4 Cha Sung-mi 1994–2003 30 55
5 Park Hee-young 2005–2013 23 55
6 Jung Seol-bin 2006–present 20 72
Cho So-hyun 2007–present 124
8 Park Eun-sun 2003–present 17 34
9 Kwon Hah-nul 2006–present 15 103
10 Lee Geum-min 2013–present 14 43
Lee Eun-mi 2007–present 84

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "각종기록" (in Korean). Korea Football Association (KFA). Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Fan Hong; J.A. Mangan (23 November 2004). Soccer, Women, Sexual Liberation: Kicking off a New Era. Routledge. pp. 71–81. ISBN 978-1-135-77058-7.
  4. ^ "Asian Games 1990 (Women's Tournament)". RSSSF. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  5. ^ Manzenreiter, Wolfram; Horne, John (14 August 2008). "Playing the Post‐Fordist Game in/to the Far East: The Footballisation of China, Japan and South Korea". Soccer & Society. 8 (4): 561–577. doi:10.1080/14660970701440899. ISSN 1466-0970.
  6. ^ "여자대표팀, 중국과 호주에서 열리는 4개국 대회 참가" [Women's national team participated in four countries in China and Australia] (in Korean). Korea Football Association. 26 December 2018.
  7. ^ "Korean stars named in Cup of Nations squad". Asian Football Confederation. 20 February 2019.

External links

Preceded by
Inaugural Champion
EAFF Women's Football Championship
2005 (First title)
Succeeded by
2008 Japan 
An Ik-soo

An Ik-Soo (Hangul: 안익수, Korean pronunciation: [a.nik̚.s͈u] or [an] [ik̚.s͈u]; born May 6, 1965) is retired football player and manager.

He played in K-League side Ilhwa Chunma and Pohang Steelers in South Korea.

Ahn was manager of South Korea women's national football team.In December 2009, He is appointed as an assistant manager of FC Seoul.

Han Jin-sook

Han Jin-sook (born 15 December 1979) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for Daekyo Kangaroos in South Korea.

Hwang In-sun (footballer)

Hwang In-sun (born 2 February 1976) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

Jin Suk-hee

Jin Suk-hee (born 9 July 1978) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

Jun Min-kyung

Jun Min-kyung (Korean: 전민경, Korean pronunciation: [tɕʌn.min.ɡjʌŋ]; born 16 January 1985) is a South Korean women's football goalkeeper, who plays for Daekyo Kangaroos WFC in South Korean WK-League and the South Korea women's national football team.

Kim Jin-hee (footballer)

Kim Jin-hee (born 26 March 1981) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She was a member of the South Korea women's national football team, and was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. At the club level, she plays for Ulsan College in South Korea.

Kim Ju-hee

Kim Ju-hee (born 10 March 1985) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for Wirye Information Industry High School in South Korea.

Kim Jung-mi (footballer)

Kim Jung-mi (Korean: 김정미; Korean pronunciation: [kim.dʑʌŋ.mi] or [kim] [tɕʌŋ.mi]; born 16 October 1984) is a South Korean footballer for the Incheon Red Angels and the South Korea women's national football team.

Kim Kyul-sil

Kim Kyul-sil (born 13 April 1982) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for Yeoju Institute of Technology in South Korea.

Kim Yoo-jin (footballer, born 1981)

Kim Yoo-jin (born 26 September 1981) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

Kim Yu-jin (footballer, born 1979)

Kim Yeo-jin (born 17 July 1979) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

Kim Yu-mi (footballer)

Kim Yu-mi (born 15 August 1979) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

Lee Ji-eun (footballer)

Lee Ji-eun (이지은; born 16 December 1979) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a forward. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

Lee Myung-hwa

Lee Myung-hwa (Korean: 이명화, Korean pronunciation: [i.mjʌŋ.ɦwa]; born July 29, 1973) is a former South Korean football player who was a member of South Korea women's national football team.

She was a foil fencer by February 1990. In 1990, she joined women's football; soon she was one of the first members of South Korea women's national football team.

Shin Sun-nam (footballer)

Shin Sun-nam (born 30 May 1981) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a midfielder. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for INI Steel in South Korea.

South Korea women's national under-17 football team

Korea Republic women's national under-17 football team represents Republic of Korea in international youth football competitions.

South Korea women's national under-20 football team

Korea Republic women's national under-20 football team represents Republic of Korea in international youth football competitions.

Sung Hyun-ah (footballer)

Sung Hyun-ah (성현아; born 5 May 1982) is a South Korean women's international footballer who plays as a forward. She is a member of the South Korea women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup. On club level she plays for Daekyo Kangaroos in South Korea.

Yoon Deok-yeo

Yoon Deok-yeo (Korean: 윤덕여; born 25 March 1961) is a South Korean soccer coach and former soccer player. He currently coaches the South Korean national women's soccer team.

17 January 2019 Four Nations TournamentSouth Korea 3–0 RomaniaMeizhou, China
15:00 CST Stadium: Wuhua County Olympic Sports Centre
Referee: Gu Chunhan (China)
20 January 2019 Four Nations TournamentSouth Korea 0–1 China PRMeizhou, China
19:35 CST
Stadium: Wuhua County Olympic Sports Centre
Referee: Qin Liang (China)
28 February 2019 Cup of NationsArgentina 0–5 South KoreaSydney, Australia
16:35 AEDT Source
Stadium: Leichhardt Oval
3 March 2019 Cup of NationsAustralia 4–1 South KoreaBrisbane, Australia
18:00 AEST
Source
Stadium: Suncorp Stadium
6 March 2019 Cup of NationsSouth Korea 2–0 New ZealandMelbourne, Australia
15:05 AEDT
Source Stadium: AAMI Park
6 April 2019 FriendlySouth Korea 2–3 IcelandYongin, South Korea
15:05 AEDT Report
Stadium: Yongin Stadium
Attendance: 15,839
Referee: Kajiyama Fusako (Japan)
9 April 2019 FriendlySouth Korea 1–1 IcelandChuncheon, South Korea
15:05 AEDT Report Stadium: Chuncheon Songam Stadium
Referee: Kajiyama Fusako (Japan)
1 June 2019 FriendlySweden 1–0 South KoreaGothenburg, Sweden
Report Stadium: Gamla Ullevi
7 June 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup – GSFrance 4–0 South KoreaParis, France
21:00 CEST
Report Stadium: Parc des Princes
Attendance: 45,261
Referee: Claudia Umpiérrez (Uruguay)
12 June 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup – GSNigeria 2–0 South KoreaGrenoble, France
15:00 CEST
Report Stadium: Stade des Alpes
Attendance: 11,252
Referee: Anastasia Pustovoitova (Russia)
17 June 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup – GSSouth Korea 1–2 NorwayReims, France
21:00 CEST
Report
Stadium: Stade Auguste-Delaune
Attendance: 13,034
Referee: Marie-Soleil Beaudoin (Canada)
General
Venues
Statistics
Players
World Finals
Asian Finals
Other tournaments
Rivalries
Culture
Other KFA teams
South Korea at the FIFA Women's World Cup
National teams
League system
Cup competitions
Reserves & academy
Other
Defunct competitions
National women's football teams of Asia (AFC)
Southeast Asia (AFF)
Central Asia (CAFA)
East Asia (EAFF)
South Asia (SAFF)
West Asia (WAFF)
Former
National football teams of East Asia (EAFF)
Men's
Women's
South Korea squads – FIFA Women's World Cup
South Korea squads – AFC Women's Asian Cup

Languages

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