South Carolina primary

The South Carolina primary has become one of several key early-state presidential primaries in the process of the Democratic and Republican Parties choosing their respective general election nominees for President of the United States.

Historically, this primary election has been much more important in the Republican Party's nomination process, considered a firewall that could permanently eliminate any/all serious rivals to the winner.[1] It is meant to force the various factions of the party to decide quickly on and unite behind a single candidate and avoid wasting precious time and resources on a drawn-out battle between their own candidates, that would divert the party's focus from working to defeat the Democrats' likely nominee.

Since its 1980 inception, the winner of the Republican South Carolina primary has always become the eventual Republican National Convention nominee for that fall's general election,[2] with one exception, the 2012 primary, in which eventual Republican nominee Mitt Romney finished second, behind winner Newt Gingrich (who would go on to suspend his campaign before that summer's convention began).

South Carolina has cemented its place as the "First in the South"[3][4] primary for both parties. For the Democrats, the 2008 primary took on added significance because it was the first nominating contest in that cycle in which a large percentage (55 percent, according to an exit poll[5]) of primary voters were African Americans.[6]

The 2012 South Carolina primary was held on January 21 for Republicans,[7] and on January 28 for Democrats. The 2016 primary was held on February 20 for Republicans, and on February 27 for Democrats.[8]

Republican results

Democratic results

See also

References

  1. ^ Scherer, Michael (2008-01-09). "Huckabee Looks to South Carolina". TIME. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  2. ^ Rudin, Ken (2008-01-16). "South Carolina's Role as GOP Kingmaker". NPR. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  3. ^ "5 Things to Watch in South Carolina's Republican Primary". ABC Newa. February 20, 2016. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  4. ^ "South Carolina's Key Role in the Presidential Race". U.S. News & World Report. February 17, 2016. Retrieved February 21, 2016.
  5. ^ "Election Center 2008: Primary Exit Polls - Elections & Politics news from". CNN.com. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  6. ^ "January 7, 2008". The Nation. 2008-01-07. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  7. ^ "GOP Primary Case Before High Court". The Post and Courier. 2011-11-15. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  8. ^ "2016 Primary Results and Calendar". New York Times. 2016-02-04. Retrieved 2016-02-09.
  9. ^ , "[1]". The Atlantic.
  10. ^ "Jackson's Triumph in South Carolina Illustrates Dramatic Change Since Vote in '84". New York Times. 1988-03-14. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  11. ^ "THE 1992 CAMPAIGN: South Carolina; Bush and Clinton Score Big Victories". New York Times. 1992-03-08. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  12. ^ "2000 Democratic Presidential Caucus Results - South Carolina". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  13. ^ "Primary Results by State - Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2012-01-05.
  14. ^ "South Carolina Primary Election Results - Election Guide 2008 - Results - The New York Times". Politics.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2012-01-05.

External links

2004 United States presidential election in South Carolina

The 2004 United States presidential election in South Carolina took place on November 2, 2004, as part of the 2004 United States presidential election which took place throughout all 50 states and D.C. Voters chose eight representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

South Carolina was won by incumbent President George W. Bush by a 17.1% margin of victory. Prior to the election, all 12 news organizations considered this a state Bush would win, or otherwise considered it as a safe red state. No Democrat had won this state since 1976. On election day, Bush won a majority of the counties and congressional districts in the state. The results were very similar to the state's results in 2000, although Democratic Senator John Edwards of the bordering state of North Carolina was chosen as the vice presidential nominee. Bush won both of the two largest counties of South Carolina, although the Democratic nominee usually carries the largest county in the state.

2008 South Carolina Democratic primary

The 2008 South Carolina Democratic presidential primary took place on January 26, 2008. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois won the primary's popular vote by a 28.9% margin.

For both parties in 2008, South Carolina's was the first primary in a Southern state and the first primary in a state in which African Americans make up a sizable percentage of the electorate. For Democrats, it was also the last primary before 22 states hosted their primaries or caucuses on February 5, 2008 (Super Tuesday).

South Carolina's 45 delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention were awarded proportionally based on the results of the primary. The state also sent nine superdelegates.

2016 South Carolina Democratic primary

The 2016 South Carolina Democratic primary took place on February 27 in the U.S. state of South Carolina, marking the Democratic Party's fourth nominating contest in their series of presidential primaries ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

Clinton won the South Carolina Democratic primary by a landslide margin of more than 47%, receiving a larger percentage of the African American vote than Obama, the first black President, did in 2008.With the Republican Party having already held its South Carolina primary a week earlier on February 20, the Democratic primary in South Carolina was the only presidential primary on that day.

2020 Alabama Democratic primary

The 2020 Alabama Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Alabama primary is a state-run open primary which will allocate 52 pledged delegates on a proportional to the results of the primary, statewide and within each congressional district. The state is also given an additional 9 unpledged delegates (superdelegates), whose vote at the convention is not bound to the result of the primary.

2020 Arkansas Democratic primary

The 2020 Arkansas Democratic primary is will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Arkansas primary is an open primary, with the state awarding 36 delegates, of which 31 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 California Democratic primary

The 2020 California Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The California primary is a semi-closed primary, with the state awarding 495 delegates, of which 416 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Colorado Democratic primary

The 2020 Colorado Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Colorado primary is a semi-closed primary, with the state awarding 80 delegates, of which 67 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Maine Democratic primary

The 2020 Maine Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Maine primary is a closed primary, with the state awarding 32 delegates, of which 24 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Minnesota Democratic primary

The 2020 Minnesota Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Minnesota primary is a closed primary, with the state awarding 92 delegates, of which 75 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Oklahoma Democratic primary

The 2020 Oklahoma Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Oklahoma primary is a semi-closed primary, with the state awarding 42 delegates, of which 37 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 South Carolina Democratic primary

The 2020 South Carolina Democratic primary will take place on Saturday, February 29, 2020, as the fourth nominating contest in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the Nevada caucuses the week before. The South Carolina primary is an open primary, with the state awarding 63 delegates, of which 54 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Tennessee Democratic primary

The 2020 Tennessee Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Tennessee primary is an open primary, with the state awarding 73 delegates, of which 64 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Texas Democratic primary

The 2020 Texas Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Texas primary is a closed primary, with the state awarding 262 delegates, of which 228 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Utah Democratic primary

The 2020 Utah Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Utah primary is a closed primary, with the state awarding 35 delegates, of which 29 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Vermont Democratic primary

The 2020 Vermont Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Vermont primary is an open primary, with the state awarding 23 delegates, of which 16 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

2020 Virginia Democratic primary

The 2020 Virginia Democratic primary will take place on Tuesday, March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The Virginia primary is an open primary, with the state awarding 124 delegates, of which 99 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

Kelly Wright

Kelly Wright is a former American reporter for Fox News Channel. He last was co-anchor of America's News Headquarters on Saturday, and was based in the network’s Washington, D.C., bureau. He was a co-host of Fox and Friends Weekend from July 2006 to January 2008.

Most recently, Wright reported from Tampa, Florida, on the Terri Schiavo story. In 2004 Wright spent nearly three months reporting on the developments in Iraq. He was among the first reporters to cover the Abu Ghraib prison scandal and the subsequent court martial cases held in Baghdad. Wright also spent time embedded with U.S. and British troops, reporting on the military’s humanitarian efforts in Baghdad, Basrah, and Mosul. Wright also provided coverage on U.S. forces training Iraqi security forces. Additionally, he reported on the historic U.S. handover of sovereignty to Iraq. Beyond Iraq, Wright extensively covered the 2004 presidential election, including the Democratic presidential race, the New Hampshire primary, and the South Carolina primary. In October 2003, Wright reported live from the Congressional Black Caucus/FNC Democratic presidential candidate debate in Detroit.

Before joining Fox News Channel, Wright worked as an anchor/reporter at WAVY-TV/WVBT-TV in Norfolk, VA, co-anchoring the Fox affiliate's first primetime newscast (produced by WAVY) from 1998 until 2003. During his tenure there, he covered a wide range of stories, including a historical event in Benin, West Africa, where African presidents Mathieu Kérékou of Benin, Jerry Rawlings of Ghana, and representatives from the United States, England, France and the Dominican Republic apologized for their role in slavery.

Previously, Wright served as a weekend news anchor and reporter for WRAL-TV in Raleigh, N.C. Wright secured numerous rare interviews, including a 1996 exclusive interview with O. J. Simpson following the criminal court trial.

Wright has also served as a general assignment reporter for WWOR-TV in New York. He reported on numerous high-profile newsmakers and events for the station, including John Gotti, Amy Fisher, the Howard Beach and Bensonhurst murder trials, and the 1989 Central Park jogger rape case.

Wright began his journalism career in 1977 while serving in the United States Army.

Wright has received numerous awards for his reporting, including two local Emmy Awards for his developing, reporting and co-producing a documentary and news series on the transatlantic slave trade.

Wright attended Oral Roberts University (ORU). He graduated with the ORU Class of 2008, and delivered the commencement address. He is married and has two sons who still live at home.

In 2017, Wright joined a lawsuit against Fox News for racial discrimination.

Opinion polling for the 2020 Republican Party presidential primaries

This is a list of nationwide and statewide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the Republican primaries for the 2020 United States presidential election. The persons named in the polls are declared candidates or have received media speculation about their possible candidacy. The polls included are among Republicans or Republicans and Republican-leaning independents. If multiple versions of polls are provided, the version among likely voters is prioritized, then registered voters, then adults.

Todd Atwater

Todd Atwater (born March 9, 1966) is an American politician who served in the South Carolina House of Representatives from the 87th district from 2010 to 2018.In the 2018 South Carolina primary election, Atwater ran against Alan Wilson for the Republican nomination for Attorney General. Atwater finished second to Wilson, forcing a run-off election on June 26, 2018. In the run-off, Atwater lost to Wilson.

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