South African Football Association

The South African Football Association or SAFA is the national administrative governing body that controls the sport of football in the Republic of South Africa (RSA) and is a member of the Confederation of African Football (CAF). SAFA was established in 1991. The South African Football Association is the second Football Association in South Africa to be named the South African Football Association and it is also the second football association in South Africa to affiliate to FIFA. The present day South African Football Association, unlike its predecessor allows for a mixed-race national team.

SAFA was admitted to FIFA in 1992 and its senior team has since represented South Africa at the Africa Cup of Nations and the FIFA World Cup.[1] During SAFA's time as the FIFA-affiliated football organisation, South Africa has also hosted several editions of the COSAFA Cup, the 1996 Africa Cup of Nations and the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

The South African Football Association is responsible for the administration of the South African national football teams (both men's and women's), and the third tier and below of the South African Football league system. The Premier Soccer League administrates the top two divisions and several cup competitions.

South African Football Association
CAF
SAFA logo
Founded
  • 1892 (original)
  • 1991 (by Richie Maguire)
HeadquartersJohannesburg
FIFA affiliation1992
CAF affiliation1992
COSAFA affiliation1997
PresidentDanny Jordaan
Websitesafa.net

History

South African Football Association (1892)

The original South African Football Association was established in 1892 and became affiliated to FIFA in 1910.[2] The SAFA of 1892 was the first association on the African continent to become affiliated to FIFA. SAFA withdrew from FIFA in 1924 and later regained full membership in 1952.[2]

In 1932, the South African African Football Association (SAAFA) was formed and a year later the South African Bantu Football Association (SABFA) and the South African Coloured Football Association (SACFA) followed suit. In September 1951, the three merged to form the anti-apartheid South African Soccer Federation (SASF).[3]

SAFA were expected to play in the newly formed Confederation of African Football's 1957 Africa Cup of Nations, however they did not. The minutes of the meetings between SAFA and their counterparts from Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan were lost to fire and so the official reason for their non-appearance is unknown.[2] Fred Fell, SAFA's representative at FIFA said that SAFA withdrew because of the conflict at the Suez Canal. There were also rumours that they were expelled from the initial competition due to their favourable stance on apartheid.[2]

In November 1954, the SASF attempted to join FIFA. In May 1955, FIFA concluded that SAFA does not have "the standing of a real national association" because it did not control all clubs, there were more clubs and players with SASF than SAFA. SASF's application was rejected because there were no white players. In 1956, FIFA chose to accept SAFA's stance that segregation was a "tradition and custom" in South Africa.

The South African Football Association were renamed to the Football Association of South Africa (FASA) in 1957. The newly renamed association also removed a clause from its constitution excluding non-whites. In his book African Soccerscapes, Professor Peter Alegi says this was to "create the perception of substantive change while maintaining the status quo".[2]

In 1959, the SASF successfully managed to have a FIFA sanctioned game between Brazilian club Portuguesa Santista and white South Africa cancelled, as the Brazilian club had agreed to withdraw its black players from the game. The SASF had complained to the Brazilian consul in Cape Town, the Brazilian government prevented the club from taking part.

At FIFA's 1960 Congress in Rome, there were calls from the Soviet bloc and Asia for the South African Soccer Federation (SASF) to become a member of FIFA in place of FASA. The calls were rejected as FIFA's own statutes stated that "a National Association must be open to all who practice football in that country whether amateur, 'non-amateur', or professional and without any racial, religious, political discrimination".[2]

In September 1961, FASA were suspended from FIFA because of their pro-apartheid stance and refusal to field non-white players. Also, in 1961 the white-South Africa sympathiser Stanley Rous was elected as FIFA President. Rous and United States citizen Joseph Maguire would later visit white South African officials for two weeks. Rous reported to FIFA that there was no wilful discrimination within FASA and on the basis of his report, FASA were allowed back into FIFA in September 1963.[2]

At the Tokyo Congress, the Confederation of African Football members were lobbying for the expulsion of the FASA unless its "obnoxious apartheid policy [was] totally eliminated". They had retained the support of Soviet and Asian National Associations and held meetings with South African Soccer Federation in Durban and the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee in London. CAF had already expelled South Africa from its own membership. The request for expulsion from FIFA was downgraded to suspension and it was passed by a majority of associations at the 1964 FIFA Congress.[2]

Following the suspension, South Africa were also not allowed to take part in the 1964 and 1968 Olympics and were expelled from the Olympic movement in 1970. During this time Rous had been lobbying to have South Africa re-instated into FIFA and the Olympics. In 1973, Brazilian FIFA President candidate Joao Havelange withdrew Brazil from the 1973 South African Games to curry favour with the anti-apartheid national associations and went to beat Rous in the FIFA Presidential Election. At the FIFA Congress on 16 July 1976 in Montreal, FASA were formally suspended from FIFA. Members of FIFA had voted to exclude South Africa 78 votes to 9.[4]

South African Football Association (1991)

The new South African Football Association was founded on 23 March 1991, the culmination of a long unity process that was to rid the sport in South Africa of all its past racial division.

A delegation of the SAFA received a standing ovation at the congress of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in Dakar, Senegal a month later, where South Africa were accorded observer status. South Africa's membership of the world governing body FIFA was confirmed at their congress in Zurich in June 1992.

Membership of CAF followed automatically and South Africa was back on the world stage, and were awarded the right to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

Within a month the country hosted their first international match as World Cup quarterfinalists Cameroon came to play in three matches to celebrate the unity process. In September 1992, South Africa played its first junior international against Botswana at under-16 level in Lenasia and to date the country has entered a team in each of FIFA's and CAF's competitions, from under-17 to national team level, and also for the women's team.

In the short space of six years, SAFA has achieved remarkable success with qualification for the World Cup finals in France in 1998, the title of African champions at the 1996 African Nations Cup finals, which the country hosted, and the runners-up berth in Burkina Faso two years later.

At under-20 level, South Africa were runners-up at the 1997 African Youth Championship in Morocco and qualified to play at the 1997 FIFA World Youth Championship in Malaysia.

At club level, Orlando Pirates won the prestigious African Champions Cup in 1995, the first club from the southern African region to take the title in more than 30 years of competition. Pirates were playing in the event for the first time and won the title away from home in the Ivory Coast to further amplify the magnificence of the victory.

Behind the scenes, SAFA has worked long and hard to provide the structures to take football to all levels of the South African community. There are now national age-group competitions from under-12 level up, qualified coaches working around the country and nine provincial affiliates, who are further divided into 52 regions.

National Executive

  • President: Danny Jordaan
  • Vice-President: Lucas Nhlapo
  • Vice-President: Elvis Shishana
  • Vice-President: Irvin Khoza[5]
  • Secretary General: Dennis Mumble

National teams

Regions

SAFA's 9 Provinces and 52 Regions

  • SAFA Eastern Cape (Regions: Alfred Nzo, Amathole, Cacadu, Chris Hani, Nelson Mandela Bay, OR Tambo, Ukhahlamba)
  • SAFA Free State (Regions: Fezile Dabi, Lejweleputswa, Motheo, Thabo Mofutsanyana, Xhariep)
  • SAFA Gauteng (Regions: Ekurhuleni, Johannesburg, Metsweding, Sedibeng, Tshwane, West Rand)
  • SAFA KwaZulu-Natal (Regions: Amajuba, Ethekwini, iLembe, Sisonke, Ugu, Umgungundlovu, Umkhanyakude, Umzinyathi, Uthukela, Uthungulu, Zululand)
  • SAFA Mpumalanga (Regions: Ehlanzeni, Gert Sibande, Nkangala)
  • SAFA Northern Cape (Regions: Frances Baard, Kgalagadi, Namakwa, Pixley-Ka-Seme, Siyanda)
  • SAFA Limpopo (Regions: Capricorn, Mopani, Sekhukhune, Vhembe, Waterberg)
  • SAFA North-West (Regions: Bojanala, Bophirima, Central, Southern)
  • SAFA Western Cape (Regions: Boland, Cape Town, Central Karoo, Eden, Overberg, West Coast)

References

  1. ^ Auf der Heyde, Peter (25 November 2009). "South Africa in international football". Independent Online. South Africa. Retrieved 30 May 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Alegi, Peter (2010). African soccerscapes : how a continent changed the world's game (1. publ. ed.). London: Hurst. ISBN 9781849040389.
  3. ^ "Timeline". sahistory.org.za. Retrieved 30 October 2013.
  4. ^ Koonyaditse, Oshebeng Alpheus (2010). The politics of South African football. Grant Park, South Africa: African Perspectives. p. 30. ISBN 978-0981439822.
  5. ^ "SAFA.net - South African Football Association". www.safa.net. Retrieved 5 June 2018.

External links

1996–97 Premier Soccer League

The 1996–97 Premier Soccer League, known as the 1996–97 Castle Premiership for sponsorship purposes, was the first season of the newly established top-flight professional football league in South Africa. The league was an 18-team competition established in 1996 by Irvin Khoza, Kaizer Motaung, Raymond Hack and Jomo Sono in conjunction with the South African Football Association and it would run parallel to the European football calendar.

Clemens Westerhof

Clemens Westerhof (born 3 May 1940 in Beek, Montferland, Gelderland) is a Dutch football manager, who has worked in various football positions on the African continent since 1989.

He is most noted for his success with the Nigerian national team. Under Westerhof, the Super Eagles won the 1994 African Cup of Nations and also qualified for the second round of the FIFA World Cup that year.

Westerhof began his career as an assistant coach with Feyenoord Rotterdam in the Dutch Eredivisie. He has also coached Vitesse Arnhem, the Zimbabwean national team, the Sporting Lions of Zimbabwe's Premier League, and the Bush Bucks and Mamelodi Sundowns of South Africa's Premier Soccer League. In addition, he has served as technical director of the Harare-based Agatha Sheneti Youth Academy and also of the Harare United club, which was linked to the Academy. In 2001, he was technical director of Dynamos FC, Zimbabwe's biggest club, but lasted in the position just a few months.

Danny Jordaan

Daniel Alexander "Danny" Jordaan (born 3 September 1951) is the president of the South African Football Association (SAFA). He is a former lecturer, politician and anti-apartheid activist. He led South Africa's successful 2010 FIFA World Cup bid, the first successful one for Africa, as well as the country's unsuccessful bid four years earlier for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, and was the Chief Executive Officer of the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa. He is also the former Mayor of the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality, having served from May 2015 until August 2016.

He has served FIFA in numerous capacities, including, as a General Co-ordinator for the Youth World Cup (now FIFA U-20 World Cup), 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup and the 2002 FIFA World Cup in Korea/Japan. He was also a match commissioner for the 2006 FIFA World Cup and a member of the 2006 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee. He served on the 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee and 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup Organising Committee.

Jordaan is also a member of the International Marketing Council.

FNB Stadium

First National Bank Stadium or simply FNB Stadium, also known as Soccer City and The Calabash, is a stadium located in Nasrec, bordering the Soweto area of Johannesburg, South Africa. The venue is managed by Stadium Management South Africa (SMSA) and is a home of Kaizer Chiefs F.C. in the South African Premier Soccer League as well as key fixtures for the South African national football team.

It is located next to the South African Football Association headquarters (SAFA House) where both the FIFA offices and the Local Organising Committee for the 2010 FIFA World Cup were housed. Designed as the main association football stadium for the World Cup, the FNB Stadium became the largest stadium in Africa with a capacity of 94,736. However, its maximum capacity during the 2010 FIFA World Cup was 84,490 due to reserved seating for the press and other VIPs. The stadium is also known by its nickname "The Calabash" due to its resemblance to the African pot or gourd.

It was the site of Nelson Mandela's first speech in Johannesburg after his release from prison in 1990, and served as the venue for a memorial service to him on 10 December 2013. It was also the site of Chris Hani's funeral. It was also the venue for the 2010 FIFA World Cup Final, which was played by the Netherlands and Spain. The World Cup closing ceremony on the day of the final saw the final public appearance of Mandela.

Irvin Khoza

Irvin Khoza (born 27 January 1948) is a South African football administrator. Nicknamed "Iron Duke / Squveve", he is the Chairman of Orlando Pirates Football Club, Chairman of the South African Premier Soccer League and by virtue of this, Vice-President of the South African Football Association. His relationship with Orlando Pirates started in 1980, when he became its secretary and owner in 1991. As the Chairman of the Premier Soccer League, he was instrumental in securing the current sponsors of the league, Absa Group Limited. He was also the Chairman of the 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee South Africa, after serving as the Chairman of South Africa's 2010 FIFA World Cup bid.

Khoza was part of the team who secured the right to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa and later became the chairman of the South African Organising Committee. At the announcement of South Africa's success, Khoza said that "This is the people of the world voting for Africa's renewal."

Irvin Khoza is married to Matina.

JVW F.C.

JVW FC is a South African women's football club based in Bedfordview, Gauteng. Since 2014, the club has been affiliated to the South African Football Association. The First Team competes at the highest level of women's football in South Africa, The Sasol League, whilst the rest of the club competes in the local league, under Eastern Local Football Association. The First Team had a memorable and record breaking 2016 season, where they beat Mamelodi Sundowns, Palace Super Falcons and Croesus Ladies for the first time since inception and went on to win the Gauteng Sasol League after defeating TUKS Ladies 6-0 in the Provincial Playoff final.

Premier Soccer League

The Premier Soccer League (PSL) is a national sports association responsible for administering the two professional football divisions in South Africa: the South African Premier Division and National First Division.

The PSL was created following an agreement between the National Soccer League and the remnants of the National Premier Soccer League (NPSL).

The association acts as a governing body and competition organiser. The PSL is affiliated to the South African Football Association (SAFA) but SAFA does not govern the PSL competitions. The National First Division (NFD) is the second-highest league of South African club soccer. Teams that are relegated from the PSL organised divisions compete in the SAFA Second Division.

SAFA Awards

The South African Football Association (SAFA) Awards are awards given to football players and coaches of South African origin by the South African Football Association. The awards were formed in 2008.

Soccer in South Africa

Association football is the most popular sport in South Africa, followed by rugby union and cricket. The governing body is the South African Football Association (SAFA). The country's top league is the Primer Division, while the main cup competitions are the Nedbank Cup, Telkom Knockout, and the MTN 8 Cup.

South Africa national development football team

The South Africa national development football team, is a development football (soccer) team, which represents South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association, the governing body for football in South Africa. The team's main objective is to give international exposure to fringe home-based players, by allowing them to play 'B-level' internationals. Since the advent of the African Nations Championship, the team now attempts to qualify for and play at the event. Since 2008 SAFA have sent the team to the COSAFA Cup, instead of the senior team. The team has played at one African Nations Championship and two COSAFA Cups.

South Africa national football team

The South Africa men's national football team represents South Africa in association football and is controlled by the South African Football Association, the governing body for football in South Africa. South Africa's home ground is FNB Stadium, so named due to a naming rights deal, in Johannesburg. The team is currently under the charge of Stuart Baxter, who was appointed as coach on 5 April 2017. The team's greatest achievement was winning the Africa Cup of Nations at home in 1996.

Having played their first match in 1924, they returned to the world stage in 1992, after 16 years of being banned from FIFA, and 40 years of effective suspension due to the apartheid system. South Africa became the first African nation to host the FIFA World Cup when it was granted host status for the 2010 edition. The team's Siphiwe Tshabalala was also the first player to score in this World Cup during the opening game against Mexico, which was followed by an iconic Macarena-style goal celebration from five South African players. Despite defeating France 2–1 in their final game of the Group Stage, they failed to progress from the first round of the tournament, becoming the first host nation in the history of the FIFA World Cup to exit in the group stage. Despite this, the team ranked 20th out of 32 sides, ranking higher than 12 teams who qualified.

South Africa national futsal team

The South Africa national futsal team is controlled by the South African Football Association, the governing body for futsal in South Africa and represents the country in international futsal competitions.

South Africa national under-17 football team

The South Africa national under-17 football team, is a youth football (soccer) team, which represents South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association, the governing body for football in South Africa. The team's main objectives are to qualify and play at the Africa U-17 Cup of Nations and FIFA U-17 World Cup.

South Africa national under-20 football team

The South Africa national under-20 football team, is a youth football (soccer) team, which represents South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association, the governing body for football in South Africa. The team's main objectives are to qualify and play at the African Youth Championship and FIFA U-20 World Cup. The team has played at seven African Youth Championships and three FIFA U-20 World Cups.

South Africa national under-23 football team

The South Africa national under-23 football team is a youth football (soccer) team, which represents South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association, the governing body for football in South Africa. The team's main objectives are to qualify and play at the All-Africa Games and Olympic Games. The team has played at three All-Africa Games and one Olympic tournament.

Players who are selected, will be 23 or younger in the following Olympic year. With the next Olympics being held in London in 2012, players need to have been born on or after 1 January 1989. At the Olympic finals tournament, the team may be supplemented with 3 over-age players.

South Africa women's national football team

The South Africa national women's football team, nicknamed Banyana Banyana (The Girls), is the national team of South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association.

Their first official match was held on 30 May 1993 against Swaziland.They qualified for Olympic football for the first time in 2012, and for a FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, in Group B with Germany, Spain and China. However, they didn't win any match, and their only goal was against Spain when they went to a 1–0 lead only to lose 3–1.

South Africa women's national under-17 football team

The South Africa U-17 women's national football team, nicknamed Bantwana, is the national team of South Africa for under 17 and is controlled by the South African Football Association.

Varsity Football (South Africa)

Varsity Football is a South African university association football competition. It is one of seven sports in the Varsity Sports series. The annual tournament involves the top football playing universities in the country, which belong to the University Sports Company. The tournament is run by Varsity Sports South Africa, and is endorsed by the South African Football Association and University Sport South Africa.The current champions of the men's competition are UP-Tuks and TUT for the women's competition.

Victor Gomes

Victor Miguel de Freitas Gomes (born 15 December 1982, Johannesburg) is a South African football referee.

A PSL referee since 2008, Gomes was voted PSL Referee of the Season in 2012–13 and 2017-18 and has been an international referee since 2011.In 2018, he was hailed by the South African Football Association after he rejected and reported an attempted bribe of over R300 000. Gomes had been approached and offered the sum of money to fix a CAF Confederation Cup match between Nigerian side Plateau United and Algerian side USM Alger. He was again nominated for the PSL Referee of the Season award upon the conclusion of the domestic campaign.

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