Sophia Loren

Sofia Villani Scicolone, Dame of the Grand Cross, OMRI (Italian: [soˈfiːa vilˈlaːni ʃʃikoˈloːne]; born 20 September 1934), known professionally as Sophia Loren (Italian: [ˈlɔːren], English: /ləˈrɛn/), is an Italian film actress and singer. She is one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood. Encouraged to enroll in acting lessons after entering a beauty pageant, Loren began her film career at age 16 in 1950. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, until her five-picture contract with Paramount in 1956 launched her international career. Notable film appearances around this time include The Pride and the Passion, Houseboat, and It Started in Naples.

Her talents as an actress were not recognized until her performance as Cesira in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women; Loren's performance earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1962 and made her the first actress to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance. She holds the record for having earned six David di Donatello Awards for Best Actress: Two Women; Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; Marriage Italian Style (for which she was nominated for a second Oscar); Sunflower; The Voyage; and A Special Day. After starting a family in the early 1970s, Loren chose to make only occasional film appearances. In later years, she has appeared in American films such as Grumpier Old Men (1995) and Nine (2009).

Aside from the Academy Award, she has won a Grammy Award, five special Golden Globes, a BAFTA Award, a Laurel Award, the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival, the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival and the Honorary Academy Award in 1991. In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievements, one of many such awards. In 1999, Loren was named by the American Film Institute as one of the 25 greatest female stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema, and she is currently the only living actress on the list.[1].

Sophia Loren

Sophia Loren - 1955
Born
Sofia Villani Scicolone

20 September 1934 (age 84)
ResidenceGeneva, Switzerland
NationalityItalian
Other namesSofia Scicolone
Sofia Lazzaro
OccupationActress and singer
Years active1950–present
Spouse(s)
Carlo Ponti Sr.
(m. 1957; ann. 1962)

(m. 1966; died 2007)
ChildrenCarlo Ponti Jr.
Edoardo Ponti
RelativesAlessandra Mussolini (niece)
Sasha Alexander (daughter-in-law)

Early life

Sofia Villani Scicolone was born on 20 September 1934 in the Clinica Regina Margherita in Rome, Italy,[2] the daughter of Romilda Villani (1910–1991) and Riccardo Scicolone, a construction engineer of noble descent (Loren wrote in her autobiography that she is entitled to call herself the Marquess of Licata Scicolone Murillo).

Loren's father Riccardo Scicolone refused to marry Villani[3], leaving the piano teacher and aspiring actress without financial support. Loren met with her father three times, at age five, age seventeen and in 1976 at his deathbed, citing that she forgave him but had never forgotten the abandonment of her mother.[4][5] Loren's parents had another child together, her sister Maria, in 1938. Loren has two younger paternal half-brothers, Giuliano and Giuseppe.[6] Romilda, Sofia, and Maria lived with Loren's grandmother in Pozzuoli, near Naples.[7]

During the Second World War, the harbour and munitions plant in Pozzuoli was a frequent bombing target of the Allies. During one raid, as Loren ran to the shelter, she was struck by shrapnel and wounded in the chin. After that, the family moved to Naples, where they were taken in by distant relatives. After the war, Loren and her family returned to Pozzuoli. Loren's grandmother Luisa opened a pub in their living room, selling homemade cherry liquor. Romilda Villani played the piano, Maria sang, and Loren waited on tables and washed dishes. The place was popular with the American GIs stationed nearby.

Pageantry

A young Sophia Loren, aged 15, at a beauty contest in Naples, Italy
Loren, age 15, as Sofia Lazzaro during the Miss Italia 1950 beauty pageant

At age 16, Loren as Sofia Lazzaro entered the Miss Italia 1950 beauty pageant and was assigned as Candidate #2, being one to the four sharing contestants representing the Lazio region. She was selected as one of the last three finalists and won the title of “Miss Elegance 1950” , while Liliana Cardinale won the title of “Miss Cinema” and Anna Maria Bugliari won the grand title of Miss Italia. In 2010, Loren returned as a judge in the 71st Miss Italia pageant.

In film

1951–1953 as Sofia Scicolone, and as Sofia Lazzaro

At age 17, as Sofia Lazzaro, she enrolled in acting class and was selected as an uncredited extra in Mervyn LeRoy's 1951 film Quo Vadis (1951), filmed when she was 17 years old.[8][9]

That same year, she appeared in Italian film Era lui... sì! sì!, where she played an odalisque, and was credited as Sofia Lazzaro. She appeared in several bit parts and minor roles in the early part of the decade, including the La Favorita (1952).[10]

1953–1970 as Sophia Loren

Carlo Ponti changed her name and public image to appeal to a wider audience as Sophia Loren, being a twist on the name of the Swedish actress Märta Torén and suggested by Goffredo Lombardo. Her first starring role was in Aida (1953), for which she received critical acclaim.[11] After playing the lead role in Two Nights with Cleopatra (1953), her breakthrough role was in The Gold of Naples (1954), directed by Vittorio De Sica.[11] Too Bad She's Bad, also released in 1954, and (La Bella Mugnaia) (1955) became the first of many films in which Loren co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni. Over the next three years, she acted in many films, including Scandal in Sorrento, Lucky to Be a Woman, Boy on a Dolphin, Legend of the Lost and The Pride and the Passion.

International fame

'La baia di Napoli"
Loren in It Started in Naples (1959), in which she sang "Tu Vuò Fà L'Americano"
2017-10-17 1046 Chinese theatre prints
Sophia Loren's Chinese theatre prints and signature

Loren became an international film star following her five-picture contract with Paramount Pictures in 1958. Among her films at this time were Desire Under the Elms with Anthony Perkins, based upon the Eugene O'Neill play; Houseboat, a romantic comedy co-starring Cary Grant; and George Cukor's Heller in Pink Tights, in which she appeared as a blonde for the first time.

In 1960, she starred in Vittorio De Sica's Two Women, a stark, gritty story of a mother who is trying to protect her 12-year-old daughter in war-torn Italy. The two end up gang-raped inside a church as they travel back to their home city following cessation of bombings there. Originally cast as the daughter, Loren fought against type and was eventually cast as the mother (actress Eleonora Brown would portray the daughter). Loren's performance earned her many awards, including the Cannes Film Festival's best performance prize, and an Academy Award for Best Actress, the first major Academy Award for a non-English-language performance or to an Italian actress. She won 22 international awards for Two Women. The film was extremely well received by critics and a huge commercial success. Though proud of this accomplishment, Loren did not show up to this award, citing fear of fainting at the award ceremony. Nevertheless, Cary Grant telephoned her in Rome the next day to inform her of the Oscar award.

During the 1960s, Loren was one of the most popular actresses in the world, and continued to make films in the United States and Europe, starring with prominent leading men. In 1964, her career reached its pinnacle when she received $1 million to appear in The Fall of the Roman Empire. In 1965, she received a second Academy Award nomination for her performance in Marriage Italian-Style.[12]

Sophia Loren 1961
Drawing of Loren by Nicholas Volpe after she won an Oscar for Two Women (1961)

Among Loren's best-known films of this period are Samuel Bronston's epic production of El Cid (1961) with Charlton Heston, The Millionairess (1960) with Peter Sellers, It Started in Naples (1960) with Clark Gable, Vittorio De Sica's triptych Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963) with Marcello Mastroianni, Peter Ustinov's Lady L (1965) with Paul Newman, the 1966 classic Arabesque with Gregory Peck, and Charlie Chaplin's final film, A Countess from Hong Kong (1967) with Marlon Brando.

Loren received four Golden Globe Awards between 1964 and 1977 as "World Film Favorite – Female".

1970–1988

Loren worked less after becoming a mother. During the next decade, most of her roles were in Italian features. During the 1970s, she was paired with Richard Burton in the last De Sica-directed film, The Voyage (1974), and a remake of the film Brief Encounter (1974). The film had its premiere on US television on 12 November 1974 as part of the Hallmark Hall of Fame series on NBC. In 1976, she starred in The Cassandra Crossing. It fared extremely well internationally, and was a respectable box office success in US market. She co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni in Ettore Scola's A Special Day (1977). This movie was nominated for 11 international awards such as two Oscars (best actor in leading role, best foreign picture). It won a Golden Globe Award and a César Award for best foreign movie. Loren's performance was awarded with a David di Donatello Award, the seventh in her career. The movie was extremely well received by American reviewers and became a box office hit.

Following this success, Loren starred in an American thriller Brass Target. This movie received mixed reviews, although it was moderately successful in the United States and internationally. In 1978, she won her fourth Golden Globe for "world film favorite". Other movies of this decade were Academy award nominee Sunflower (1970), which was a critical success, and Arthur Hiller's Man of La Mancha (1972), which was a critical and commercial failure despite being nominated for several awards, including two Golden Globes. O'Toole and James Coco were nominated for two NBR awards, in addition the NBR listed Man of La Mancha in its best ten pictures of 1972 list.[11]

In 1980, after the international success of the biography Sophia Loren: Living and Loving, Her Own Story by A. Hotchner, Loren portrayed herself and her mother in a made-for-television biopic adaptation of her autobiography, Sophia Loren: Her Own Story. Ritza Brown and Chiara Ferrari each portrayed the younger Loren. In 1981, she became the first female celebrity to launch her own perfume, 'Sophia', and a brand of eyewear soon followed.[11]

In 1982, while in Italy, she made headlines after serving an 18-day prison sentence on tax evasion charges – a fact that failed to hamper her popularity or career. In fact, Bill Moore, then employed at Pickle Packers International advertising department, sent her a pink pickle-shaped trophy for being "the prettiest lady in the prettiest pickle". In 2013, the supreme court of Italy cleared her of the charges.[13]

She acted infrequently during the 1980s and in 1981 turned down the role of Alexis Carrington in the television series Dynasty. Although she was set to star in 13 episodes of CBS's Falcon Crest in 1984 as Angela Channing's half-sister Francesca Gioberti, negotiations fell through at the last moment and the role went to Gina Lollobrigida instead. Loren preferred devoting more time to raising her sons.[14][15]

Loren has recorded more than two dozen songs throughout her career, including a best-selling album of comedic songs with Peter Sellers; reportedly, she had to fend off his romantic advances. Partly owing to Sellers's infatuation with Loren, he split with his first wife, Anne Howe. Loren has made it clear to numerous biographers that Sellers's affections were reciprocated only platonically. This collaboration was covered in The Life and Death of Peter Sellers where actress Sonia Aquino portrayed Loren. The song "Where Do You Go To (My Lovely)?" by Peter Sarstedt was said to have been inspired by Loren.[16][17]

Later career

Sophia Loren Cannes 2014 2
Loren in 2014

In 1991, Loren received the Academy Honorary Award for her contributions to world cinema and was declared "one of the world cinema's treasures". In 1995, she received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.[18]

She presented Federico Fellini with his honorary Oscar in April 1993. In 2009, Loren stated on Larry King Live that Fellini had planned to direct her in a film shortly before his death in 1993.[19] Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Loren was selective about choosing her films and ventured into various areas of business, including cookbooks, eyewear, jewelry, and perfume. She received a Golden Globe nomination for her performance in Robert Altman's film Ready to Wear (1994), co-starring Julia Roberts.

In 1994, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California Walk of Stars was dedicated to her.[20]

In Grumpier Old Men (1995), Loren played a femme fatale opposite Walter Matthau, Jack Lemmon, and Ann-Margret. The film was a box-office success and became Loren's biggest US hit in years.[11] At the 20th Moscow International Film Festival in 1997, she was awarded an Honorable Prize for contribution to cinema.[21] In 1999, the American Film Institute named Loren among the greatest female stars of Golden Age of Hollywood cinema. In 2001, Loren received a Special Grand Prix of the Americas Award at the Montreal World Film Festival for her body of work.[22] She filmed two projects in Canada during this time: the independent film Between Strangers (2002), directed by her son Edoardo and co-starring Mira Sorvino, and the television miniseries Lives of the Saints (2004).

In 2009, after five years off the set and 14 years since she starred in a prominent US theatrical film, Loren starred in Rob Marshall's film version of Nine, based on the Broadway musical that tells the story of a director whose midlife crisis causes him to struggle to complete his latest film; he is forced to balance the influences of numerous formative women in his life, including his deceased mother. Loren was Marshall's first and only choice for the role. The film also stars Daniel Day-Lewis, Penélope Cruz, Kate Hudson, Marion Cotillard, and Nicole Kidman. As a part of the cast, she received her first nomination for a Screen Actors Guild Award.

In 2010, Loren played her own mother in a two-part Italian television miniseries about her early life, directed by Vittorio Sindoni with Margareth Madè as Loren, entitled La Mia Casa È Piena di Specchi (My House Is Full of Mirrors), based on the memoir by her sister Maria. In July 2013, Loren made her film comeback in an Italian adaptation of Jean Cocteau's 1930 play The Human Voice (La Voce Umana), which charts the breakdown of a woman who is left by her lover – with her youngest son, Edoardo Ponti, as director. Filming took under a month during July in various locations in Italy, including Rome and Naples. It was Loren's first significant feature film since Nine.[23]

Loren received a star on 16 November 2017, at Almeria Walk of Fame due to his intervention in Bianco, rosso e....[24][25][26] She received the Almería Tierra de Cine award.[27]

Lawsuits

In September 1999, Loren filed a lawsuit against 79 adult websites for posting altered nude photos of her on the internet.[28][29]

Personal life

Sophia Loren L.A.
Loren in 1986

Loren is a Roman Catholic.[30] Her primary residence has been in Geneva, Switzerland, since late 2006.[31] She also owns homes in Naples and Rome.

Loren is an ardent fan of the football club S.S.C. Napoli. In May 2007, when the team was third in Serie B, she told the Gazzetta dello Sport that she would do a striptease if the team won.[32]

Loren posed for the 2007 Pirelli Calendar.[33]

Affair with Cary Grant

Loren and Cary Grant co-starred in Houseboat (1958). Grant's wife Betsy Drake wrote the original script, and Grant originally intended that she would star with him. After he began an affair with Loren while filming The Pride and the Passion (1957), Grant arranged for Loren to take Drake's place with a rewritten script for which Drake did not receive credit. The affair ended in bitterness before The Pride and the Passion's filming ended, causing problems on the Houseboat set. Grant hoped to resume the relationship, but Loren agreed to marry Carlo Ponti, instead.[34]

Marriage and family

Loren first met Carlo Ponti Sr. in 1950, when she was 16 and he was 37. Though Ponti had been long separated from his first wife, Giuliana, he was not legally divorced when Loren married him by proxy (two male lawyers stood in for them) in Mexico on 17 September 1957.[35] The couple had their marriage annulled in 1962 to escape bigamy charges, but continued to live together. In 1965, the couple became French citizens after their application was approved by then French President Georges Pompidou.[35][36] Ponti then obtained a divorce from Giuliana in France, allowing him to marry Loren on 9 April 1966.[37]

They had two children, Carlo Ponti Jr., born on 29 December 1968, and Edoardo Ponti, born on 6 January 1973.[38] Loren's daughters-in-law are Sasha Alexander and Andrea Meszaros.[6][39] Loren has four grandchildren. Loren remained married to Carlo Ponti until his death on 10 January 2007 of pulmonary complications.[40]

In 1962, Loren's sister Maria married the youngest son of Benito Mussolini, Romano, with whom she had two daughters, Alessandra, a national conservative Italian politician, and Elisabetta.[41]

Filmography

Year Title Role Notes
1950 I Am the Capataz Secretary of the Dictator
Barbablu's Six Wives Girl kidnapped
Tototarzan A tarzanide
Il voto A commoner at the Piedigrotta festival
Hearts at Sea Extra Uncredited
1951 Brief Rapture A girl in the boardinghouse
Owner of the Vapor Ballerinetta
Milan Billionaire Extra Uncredited
Magician for Force The bride
Quo Vadis Lygia's slave Uncredited
Era lui... sì! sì! (It Was Him!... Yes! Yes!) Odalisque As Sofia Lazzaro
Anna Night club assistant Uncredited
1952 And Arrived the Accordatore Amica di Giulietta
I Dream of Zorro Conchita As Sofia Scicolone
La Favorita Leonora
1953 The Country of the Campanelli Bonbon
Pilgrim of Love Giulietta / Beppina Delli Colli
We Find Ourselves in the Gallery Marisa
Two Nights with Cleopatra Cleopatra/Nisca
Girls Marked Danger Elvira
Good Folk's Sunday Ines
Aida Aida
Woman of the Red Sea Barbara Lama
1954 Neapolitan Carousel Sisina
A Slice of Life gazzara Segment: "La macchina fotografica"
Un giorno in pretura Anna
The Anatomy of Love The girl
Poverty and Nobility Gemma
The Gold of Naples Sofia Segment: "Pizze a Credito"
Attila Honoria
Too Bad She's Bad Lina Stroppiani
1955 The Sign of Venus Agnese Tirabassi
The Miller's Beautiful Wife Carmela
The River Girl Nives Mongolini
Scandal in Sorrento Donna Sofia
1956 Lucky to Be a Woman Antonietta Fallari
1957 Boy on a Dolphin Phaedra
The Pride and the Passion Juana
Legend of the Lost Dita
1958 Desire Under the Elms Anna Cabot
The Key Stella
The Black Orchid Rose Bianco Volpi Cup for Best Actress
Houseboat Cinzia Zaccardi Nominated—Academy Award for Best Original Song
Nominated—Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay
Laurel Award for Best Comedy
1959 That Kind of Woman Kay
1960 Heller in Pink Tights Angela Rossini
It Started in Naples Lucia Curio Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
The Millionairess Epifania Parerga
A Breath of Scandal Princess Olympia
Two Women Cesira
1961 El Cid Ximena
Madame Sans-Gêne, a.k.a., "Madame" Catherine Hubscher, known as "Madame Sans-Gêne"
1962 Boccaccio '70 Zoe Segment: "La Riffa"
The Prisoners of Altona with Maximillian Schell, Robert Wagner, and Frederic March Filmed in Tirrenia, Italy
Five Miles to Midnight Lisa Macklin
1963 Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow Adelina Sbaratti/Anna Molteni/Mara David di Donatello for Best Actress
Nominated—Nastro d'Argento for Best Actress
1964 The Fall of the Roman Empire Lucilla
Marriage Italian-Style Filumena Marturano
1965 Operation Crossbow Nora
Lady L Lady Louise Lendale/Lady L
1966 Judith Judith
Arabesque Yasmin Azir
1967 A Countess from Hong Kong Natasha
More Than a Miracle Isabella Candeloro Nominated—Nastro d'Argento for Best Actress
1968 Ghosts – Italian Style Maria Lojacono
1970 Sunflower Giovanna
1971 Lady Liberty Maddalena Ciarrapico
The Priest's Wife Valeria Billi
1972 Man of La Mancha Aldonza/Dulcinea
1973 The Sin Hermana Germana
1974 The Voyage Adriana de Mauro
Verdict Teresa Leoni
Brief Encounter Anna Jesson Television film (Hallmark hall of fame)
1975 Sex Pot la pupa del gangster / Get Rita Pupa known by several titles: 'Sex Pot', 'La Pupa del Gangster' & 'Get Rita'
1976 The Cassandra Crossing Jennifer Rispoli Chamberlain
1977 A Special Day Antoinette
1978 Blood Feud Titina Paterno
Brass Target Mara/cameo role
Angela Angela Kincaid
1979 Firepower Adele Tasca
1980 Sophia Loren: Her Own Story Herself/Romilda Villani (her mother)
1983 2019, After the Fall of New York Cameo appearance
1984 Aurora Aurora Television film
1986 Courage Marianna Miraldo Television film
1988 The Fortunate Pilgrim Lucia Television miniseries
1989 Running Away Cesira Television miniseries (remake of Two Women)
1990 Saturday, Sunday and Monday Rosa Priore Premiered during the Chicago Film Festival
1994 Prêt-à-Porter Isabella de la Fontaine
1995 Grumpier Old Men Maria Sophia Coletta Ragetti
1997 Soleil Maman Levy
2001 Francesca e Nunziata Francesca Montorsi Television miniseries
2002 Between Strangers Olivia
2004 Too Much Romance... It's Time for Stuffed Peppers Maria
Lives of the Saints Teresa Innocente Television miniseries
2009 Nine Mamma
2010 My House Is Full of Mirrors Romilda Villani Television miniseries
2011 Cars 2 Mama Topolino Voice (in non-English speaking countries)
2013/14 La Voce Umana One-woman film role Short film; presented at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival
2016 Sophia Loren: Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival Herself Documentary; taped at the 2015 TCM Classic Film Festival

Box office rating

According to box office polls, Loren was voted among the most popular stars with British and American audiences.

  • 1960 – most popular actress (3rd most popular star in UK)
  • 1961 – 2nd most popular actress (2nd most popular star in UK)
  • 1962 – 3rd most popular actress (7th most popular star in UK)
  • 1964 – most popular actress in UK[43], 24th most popular star in America
  • 1965 – 4th most popular star in UK
  • 1966 – 14th most popular star in America

Selected discography

Singles

Albums

Compilations

  • 1992 – Le canzoni di Sophia Loren (CGD, 2xCD)
  • 2006 – Secrets Of Rome (it:Traditional Line, CD)
  • 2009 – Τι Είναι Αυτό Που Το Λένε Αγάπη - Το Παιδί Και Το Δελφίνι (it:Δίφωνο, CD)

Russian National Orchestra

References

  1. ^ "AFI Recognizes the 50 Greatest American Screen Legends" (Press release). American Film Institute. 16 June 1999. Archived from the original on 13 January 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2016.
  2. ^ EnciclopediaTreccani. "Sophia Loren profile". Treccani.it. Retrieved 15 March 2010.
  3. ^ "YouTube". www.youtube.com.
  4. ^ "Interviews of a Lifetime" (1991) – Barbara Walters with Sofia Loren.
  5. ^ Carr, Jay (22 August 1993). "Sophia Loren Now Appearing in 'El Cid', she remains a very human icon". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 15 November 2012. Retrieved 15 March 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Sophia Loren Archives – Chronicles". Lorenarchives.com. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  7. ^ "Sophia Loren Has a Secret: How She's Managed To Survive". Parade. 18 January 1987.
  8. ^ Celia M. Reilly. "Quo Vadis". Turner Classic Movies.
  9. ^ Small, Pauline (2009). Sophia Loren: Moulding the Star. Intellect Books. p. 24. ISBN 978-1-84150-234-2. Retrieved 5 May 2017.
  10. ^ La Favorita – 1952 – https://pics.filmaffinity.com/la_favorita-233461134-large.jpg
  11. ^ a b c d e "Sophia Loren biography at". Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved 15 March 2010.
  12. ^ Leslie, Roger (2017). Oscar's Favorite Actors: The Winningest Stars (and More Who Should Be). Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. p. 277. ISBN 9781476669564.
  13. ^ Davies, Lizzy (24 October 2013). "Sophia Loren wins tax case after 40 years". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 November 2013.
  14. ^ Hall, Jane (22 October 1984). "Sophia's Choice – Kids & Family Life, Sophia Loren". People. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  15. ^ "Sophia Loren – Actors and Actresses – Films as Actress:, Publications". Filmreference.com. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  16. ^ Keating, Fiona (1 February 2017). "Peter Sarstedt, singer of Where Do You Go To My Lovely? dies aged 75". IBTimes. Retrieved 12 January 2018.
  17. ^ Spencer, Dave (2008). A Smudge on My Lens. Troubador Publishing Ltd. p. 97. ISBN 978-1-906510-78-7.
  18. ^ "Sophia Loren reflects on her Hollywood". Golden Globes. Archived from the original on 13 March 2013. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  19. ^ "CNN.com – Transcripts". CNN. 15 December 2009. Retrieved 15 March 2010.
  20. ^ Palm Springs Walk of Stars by date dedicatedArchived 13 October 2012 at the Wayback Machine, palmspringswalkofstars.com; accessed January 31, 2015.
  21. ^ "20th Moscow International Film Festival (1997)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 22 March 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  22. ^ Awards 2001Archived 16 September 2009 at the Wayback Machine. Festival des Films du Monde.
  23. ^ "Sophia Loren to return to big screen in son's film". Reuters. 9 July 2013.
  24. ^ Europa Press (18 November 2017). "Sophia Loren ya luce su estrella en el Paseo de La Fama de Almería". El Mundo (in Spanish). Almeria. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  25. ^ "Sophia Loren descubre su estrella en el Paseo de la Fama de Almería". Radiotelevisión Española (in Spanish). 18 November 2017. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  26. ^ Martínez, Evaristo (16 November 2017). "El Paseo de las Estrellas ya espera a Sophia Loren". La Voz de Almería (in Spanish). Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  27. ^ "Sophia Loren recibe el premio 'Almería Tierra de Cine' y tendrá su estrella en el paseo de la Fama". La Voz de Almería (in Spanish). 29 October 2017. Retrieved 2 December 2017.
  28. ^ The Fake Detective. "Law Suits Involving Fakes And Celebrity Photographs". Archived from the original on 27 May 2010. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  29. ^ Profile Archived 3 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine, markroesler.com; accessed 31 January 2015.
  30. ^ Loren Calls For Late Pope's Beatification, contactmusic.com; accessed 31 January 2015.
  31. ^ "Sophia Loren – Loren Leaves Italy For Switzerland". Contactmusic.com. 12 October 2006. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  32. ^ Staff writers (15 May 2007). "Napoli fan Sofia Loren to strip if team go up". Thomson Reuters. Retrieved 23 April 2008.
  33. ^ Gorgan, Elena (17 November 2006). "Sophia Loren Sizzles in the New Pirelli Calendar". Softpedia. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 12 March 2010.
  34. ^ Jaynes, Barbara Grant & Trachtenberg, Robert (2004). Cary Grant: A Class Apart. Burbank, California: Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and Turner Entertainment.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  35. ^ a b "Carlo Ponti, Husband to Sophia Loren, Dead at 94". Associated Press. Fox News. 10 January 2007. Archived from the original on 4 September 2013. Retrieved 25 February 2018.
  36. ^ Profile, commdiginews.com; accessed 31 January 2015.
  37. ^ Exshaw, John (12 January 2007). "Carlo Ponti obituary". The Independent. London, UK. Archived from the original on 19 February 2007.
  38. ^ "Sophia Loren". Biography.
  39. ^ "Carlo Ponti, Jr., Weds in St. Stephen's Basilica". Life. 18 September 2004. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  40. ^ "Sophia Loren's Husband Carlo Ponti Passes Away". Hello. 10 January 2007. Retrieved 10 December 2010.
  41. ^ Hooper, John (8 February 2006). "Obituary: Romano Mussolini". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  42. ^ "4th Moscow International Film Festival (1965)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 8 December 2012.
  43. ^ 007 again tops the poll: London, Jan. 1 South China Sunday Post – Herald (1950–1972) [Hong Kong] 02 Jan 1966: 8.
  44. ^ "lorenarchives.com". www.lorenarchives.com.

External links

AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars

Part of the AFI 100 Years... series, AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars is a list of the top 25 male and 25 female greatest screen legends of American film history. The list was unveiled by the American Film Institute on June 15, 1999, in a CBS special hosted by Shirley Temple, with 50 current actors making the presentations.

The American Film Institute defined an "American screen legend" as an actor or a team of actors during the Classical Hollywood cinema era with a significant screen presence in American feature-length (40 min or more) films whose screen debut occurred in or before 1950, or whose screen debut occurred after 1950, but whose death has marked a completed body of work.

The top stars of their respective gender are Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn. They starred together in the classic adventure 1951 film The African Queen, for which Bogart won his only Academy Award. Kirk Douglas, Sidney Poitier, and Sophia Loren are the only surviving members mentioned on the list.

A Breath of Scandal

A Breath of Scandal (also known as Olympia in Italy) is a 1960 film adapted from Ferenc Molnár's stage play Olympia. It stars Sophia Loren, Maurice Chevalier, John Gavin and Angela Lansbury and was directed by Michael Curtiz. The film is set at the turn of the 20th century and features lush technicolor photography of Vienna and the countryside of Austria. The costumes and lighting were designed by George Hoyningen-Huene and executed by Ella Bei of the Knize fashion house (Austria). Due in part to Curtiz's direction which Sophia Loren was at odds with, Italian director Vittorio De Sica was hired to reshoot certain scenes with Loren after hours without Curtiz's knowledge.

The film is based on the 1928 play Olympia rather than being a remake of the 1929 MGM film His Glorious Night.

A Special Day

A Special Day (Italian: Una giornata particolare) is a 1977 Italian drama film directed by Ettore Scola and starring Sophia Loren, Marcello Mastroianni and John Vernon. Set in Rome in 1938, its narrative follows a woman and her neighbor who stay home the day Adolf Hitler visits Benito Mussolini. It is an Italian-Canadian co-production.

Themes addressed in the film include gender roles, fascism, and the persecution of homosexuals under the Mussolini regime. It received several nominations and awards, including a César Award for Best Foreign Film, a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film, and two Academy Award nominations in 1978. It is featured on the list of the 100 Italian films to be saved.

Angela (1978 film)

Angela is a 1978 Canadian drama film directed by Boris Sagal. It stars Sophia Loren and Steve Railsback.

Carlo Ponti

Carlo Fortunato Pietro Ponti Sr. (11 December 1912 – 10 January 2007) was an Italian film producer with more than 140 productions to his credit. He was the husband of international film star Sophia Loren.

David di Donatello for Best Actress

The David di Donatello Award for Best Actress (Italian: David di Donatello per la migliore attrice protagonista) is a film award presented annually by the Accademia del Cinema Italiano (ACI, Academy of Italian Cinema) to recognize the outstanding performance in a leading role of an actress who has worked within the Italian film industry during the year preceding the ceremony. Nominees and winner are selected via a run-off voting by all the members of the Accademia.

The award was first given in 1956. Sophia Loren is the record holder in this category with six awards, followed by Margherita Buy and Monica Vitti with five awards each.

Firepower (film)

Firepower is a 1979 British thriller film directed by Michael Winner and starring Sophia Loren, James Coburn, O. J. Simpson and Eli Wallach. It was the final film in the career of actor Victor Mature. The film was poorly reviewed by critics who objected to its convoluted plot, though the lead performances and filming locations were generally praised.

Goodness Gracious Me (song)

"Goodness Gracious Me" is a comedy song recorded by Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren. Released by Parlophone, it was a top 5 UK single in 1960. It features Sellers acting the role of an Indian doctor, and Loren of his wealthy Italian patient – who fall in love

Jayne Mansfield-Sophia Loren photo

American actress Jayne Mansfield was known for her publicity stunts, including what are now called wardrobe malfunctions. The most well-known occurred during a dinner at the exclusive Beverly Hills Romanoff's restaurant. Hosted by Paramount Pictures, many A-list celebrities were present to officially welcome Italian actress Sophia Loren to Hollywood. Mansfield, who had not been invited, was the last person to arrive. She went directly to Loren's table. She was braless and wearing an extremely low-cut satin dress that showed off her ample 40D breasts. With photographers crowded around the table, she deliberately rose and leaned forward, further exposing her breasts and left nipple. A photograph of the two women, with Loren casting a side-eye look at Mansfield's exposed breasts, was distributed world-wide and became an international sensation.

Mansfield continued to stage planned incidents when she exposed her breasts to the public and press. She died in an auto accident at age 34. Loren went on to a long and successful Hollywood career.

Lady Liberty (film)

Lady Liberty (Italian: La mortadella) is a 1971 Italian-French comedy film directed by Mario Monicelli and starring Sophia Loren, William Devane, Gigi Proietti, Susan Sarandon, Danny DeVito and Edward Herrmann in his film debut.

Legend of the Lost

Legend of the Lost is a 1957 Technicolor Italian-American adventure film produced and directed by Henry Hathaway, shot in Technirama by Jack Cardiff, and starring John Wayne, Sophia Loren, and Rossano Brazzi. The location shooting for the film took place near Tripoli, Libya.

List of actors nominated for Academy Awards for non-English performances

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has given Academy Awards to actors and actresses for non-English performances in films, with the first award given in 1961. For an actor or actress to be eligible for any of the Academy Awards for Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, or Best Supporting Actress for a foreign language performance in a film produced outside the United States, the film must have been commercially released in Los Angeles County and have English subtitles with the theatrical release.

In 1962, Sophia Loren became the first actor to win an Oscar for a foreign-language performance.

As of 2019, 36 actors and actresses have been nominated for Academy Awards for non-English language performances. Eight of these actors and actresses have received Academy Awards for their performances. Six actors have won for a performance that was mostly or solely spoken in a language other than English: Sophia Loren for Two Women (Italian), Robert De Niro for The Godfather Part II (Italian), Marlee Matlin for Children of a Lesser God (American Sign Language), Roberto Benigni for Life Is Beautiful (Italian), Benicio del Toro for Traffic (Spanish), and Marion Cotillard for La Vie en Rose (French). Two actors have won for performances mostly spoken in English (Penélope Cruz for her English and Spanish-language performance in Vicky Cristina Barcelona and Christoph Waltz for Inglourious Basterds (English, German, French and Italian).

Six actors have had multiple Academy Award nominations for foreign-language performances: Marcello Mastroianni (three Best Actor nominations for Italian-language performances), Sophia Loren (one Academy Award for Best Actress for Two Women and another Best Actress nomination for Marriage Italian-Style, both for Italian-language performances), Liv Ullmann (two Best Actress nominations for Swedish-language performances), Isabelle Adjani (two Best Actress nominations for French-language performances), Javier Bardem (two Best Actor nominations for Spanish-language performances), and Marion Cotillard (one Academy Award for Best Actress for La Vie en Rose and another Best Actress nomination for Two Days, One Night, both for French-language performances).Sophia Loren and Marion Cotillard are the only actresses to win an Academy Award for Best Actress for foreign language performances, Italian and French, respectively. Cotillard is the only actor to receive two Oscar nominations for foreign films without having her films nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. She is also the only actor to be nominated for a Belgian film ("Two Days, One Night").

Roberto Benigni is the only actor to win an Academy Award for Best Actor for a foreign language performance.

List of submissions to the 37th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film

The following 18 films, all from different countries, were submitted for the 37th Academy Awards in the category Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The titles highlighted in blue and yellow were the five nominated films, which came from France, Israel, Italy, Japan and Sweden. Italy won the award for romantic comedy Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, starring Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni.Czechoslovakia, Israel and Turkey submitted films to the competition for the first time.

More Than a Miracle

More Than a Miracle is a 1967 film also titled Cinderella Italian Style and Happily Ever After. It stars Sophia Loren, Omar Sharif and Dolores del Río. The movie has a fairy tale narrative. Filmed in the countryside outside Naples, Francesco Rosi directed and Carlo Ponti produced. The theme music was a hit for Roger Williams, reaching #2 on Billboard's survey. Sergio Franchi recorded the title song (written by Kusik; Snyder; Piccioni) on his 1968 RCA Victor album, I'm a Fool To Want You.

The Black Orchid (film)

The Black Orchid is a 1959 American drama film starring Sophia Loren and Anthony Quinn.

The Priest's Wife

The Priest's Wife (Italian: La moglie del prete) is a 1971 Italian comedy film directed by Dino Risi. The song "Anyone", sung by Loren, was released as a single.

The Sign of Venus

The Sign of Venus (Italian: Il segno di Venere) is a 1955 Italian comedy film directed by Dino Risi and starring Sophia Loren. It was entered into the 1955 Cannes Film Festival.

Two Women

Two Women (Italian: La ciociara [la tʃoˈtʃaːra], roughly translated as "The Woman from Ciociaria") is a 1960 Italian film directed by Vittorio De Sica. It tells the story of a woman trying to protect her young daughter from the horrors of war. The film stars Sophia Loren, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Raf Vallone, Eleonora Brown, Carlo Ninchi, and Andrea Checchi. The film was adapted by De Sica and Cesare Zavattini from the novel of the same name written by Alberto Moravia. The story is fictional, but based on actual events of July 1943 in Rome and rural Lazio, and during what the Italians call the Marocchinate.

Awards for Sophia Loren
1946–1975
1975–2000
2001–present
Presidents of the César Awards ceremonies

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